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Super Contributor
Posts: 429
Registered: ‎03-10-2010
On 3/15/2015 mominohio said:On 3/15/2015 4uthebest said:

On 3/14/2015 lovesrecess said:

If I need a Pyrex pan, I just go to the Goodwill store where they almost always have several...I try and get the oldest one I can find that isn't chipped.

Please help us out how do you tell old from new?

Pyrex Love and Corelle Corner are two good sites to start with finding the different logos and ages

Thank you.. brought back memories of Pyrex percolator and double boiler.. imagine that withstanding flame from stove. :-)

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,178
Registered: ‎09-02-2010

LOL, well I guess I like living on the edge here. The way I see it a chip is no different than when when the big make glasses out of beer/wine bottles. Once you sand that raw edge down you can use them. Most of my chips I've ever sanded are barely visible. Now a crack would be a totally different thing, I'd toss that.

*ETA* I actually use sandpaper and you can find fine enough that it's very smooth.

~~
*Off The Deep End~A very short trip for some!*
Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,686
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
On 3/16/2015 debc said:

LOL, well I guess I like living on the edge here. The way I see it a chip is no different than when when the big make glasses out of beer/wine bottles. Once you sand that raw edge down you can use them. Most of my chips I've ever sanded are barely visible. Now a crack would be a totally different thing, I'd toss that.

*ETA* I actually use sandpaper and you can find fine enough that it's very smooth.

I would not use a modern-day Pyrex dish that had ANY damage whatsoever, including a chip.

Here's a sidebar from the lengthy investigation that CR conducted in 2012:

To minimize the chances of glass bakeware shattering, read and save the safety instructions on the product's packaging. Here are some safety rules to follow:

  • Always place hot glassware on a dry, cloth potholder or towel.
  • Never put glassware directly on a burner or under a broiler.
  • Always allow the oven to fully preheat before placing the glassware in the oven.
  • Always cover the bottom of the dish with liquid before cooking meat or vegetables.
  • Don't add liquid to hot glassware.
  • If you're using the dish in a microwave, do not use browning elements, and avoid overheating oil or butter.
  • Do not take dishes directly from the freezer to the oven or vice versa.
  • Never place hot glassware on top of a stove, on a metal trivet, on a damp towel, in the sink, on a cold or wet surface, or directly on a countertop.
  • Inspect your dishes for chips, cracks, and scratches. Discard dishes with such damage.
  • To avoid risks associated with glass dishes, consider using metal bakeware for conventional and convection ovens.

~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland