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Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,826
Registered: ‎08-08-2010
On 3/12/2015 suzyQ3 said:

Here's some info I have posted in the past about Pyrex and Anchor Hocking that points out the change to a cheaper and potentially dangerous forumla:

For anyone who wants an UNBIASED account of the development and changes in Pyrex and Anchor Hocking, it would behoove them to read the Consumer Reports article entitled "Glass Bakeware That Shatters" in its January 2011 issue and not depend solely on the manufacturer's own website.

The Consumer Reports in-depth five-page analysis was a year in the making and includes the history of the glassware, the results of their lab tests on the current Pyrex and Anchor Hocking products made in the U.S. and those made in Europe, a series of interviews with people severely injured from shattered glass bakeware, suggestions for consumers' safety when using the bakeware, and a plea for government action, primarily because the two companies have been reluctant to address the problems but instead have taken a "blame the victim" stance.

Yes, World Kitchen does claim that Pyrex has consistently been made of soda lime glass for 60 years. However, Sarah Horvath, a Corning spokewoman, states that Corning made Pyrex out of both soda lime and borosilicate before selling to World Kitchen in 1998. And a former executive scientist with Corning, P. Bruce Adams, says that borosilicate was still being used by Pyrex when he retired in 1987. So it is not at all clear when the switch took place.

The important point is that strengthened or not, the cheaper soda lime version tested much more poorly than did the more expensive borosilicate glass, which by the way, is still made in Europe by the company that bought the rights from Pyrex in 1994.

This information is not really new, but it is delineated clearly and thoroughly in this Consumer Reports article. It is worth reading before deciding to buy Pyrex or Anchor Hocking glass bakeware. And the sidebar on reducing the risks if one does decide to buy and use the product is invaluable.

A google search of "Pyrex dangers" will verify this information.

I was just about to post the same, thanks for bringing this up. The new glass isn't the same as the older glass. Different formula and resulting in a different (weaker for the new stuff) strength.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,278
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I sure wish Pyrex stuck with the Borosilicate glass. It was superior and I still have lots of Boro glass pieces, both Pyrex and other. The soda lime is just plain inferior and I guess it must be cheaper to manufacture, otherwise why would they go with something else?

Same applies to many of the Corning Ware products that were made of their proprietary material, Pyroceram. That stuff is awesome but they went to Chinese-made stoneware that is nowhere near as good.

If you want to get some of the older CW Pyroceram, ebay is a good choice. I purchased numerous pieces that were brand new and in brand new condition from ebay. I have the French White and French Black. That is one of the CW lines that went to Chinese stoneware. Once, years ago, when I broke one of mine, my husband purchased another whole set of French White for me. When I looked at it I could tell right away that it was not the same stuff. Then I saw 'stoneware made in China' on the bottom and that made sense why it chipped easily and didn't look as nice. I slowly replaced all those pieces with Pyroceram pieces and got rid of the old Chinese stoneware (I never told him, so he doesn't know. I was gracious about it).

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,627
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Toss the chipped Pyrex dish. I don't trust Pyrex anymore. I have an old 9x13 baking dish that was part of a wedding gift. I've been using it for 36 years, and it is in perfect condition. I put it in the dishwasher and it still sparkles like it is new.

I've bought a couple of pieces, in more recent years, and they aren't safe to use, IMO. I took one out of the cabinet and it broke apart in my hands. Thank goodness there wasn't hot food in it.

"I've been here since October 2006. Wow!"
Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,826
Registered: ‎08-08-2010
On 3/12/2015 chickenbutt said:

I sure wish Pyrex stuck with the Borosilicate glass. It was superior and I still have lots of Boro glass pieces, both Pyrex and other. The soda lime is just plain inferior and I guess it must be cheaper to manufacture, otherwise why would they go with something else?

Same applies to many of the Corning Ware products that were made of their proprietary material, Pyroceram. That stuff is awesome but they went to Chinese-made stoneware that is nowhere near as good.

If you want to get some of the older CW Pyroceram, ebay is a good choice. I purchased numerous pieces that were brand new and in brand new condition from ebay. I have the French White and French Black. That is one of the CW lines that went to Chinese stoneware. Once, years ago, when I broke one of mine, my husband purchased another whole set of French White for me. When I looked at it I could tell right away that it was not the same stuff. Then I saw 'stoneware made in China' on the bottom and that made sense why it chipped easily and didn't look as nice. I slowly replaced all those pieces with Pyroceram pieces and got rid of the old Chinese stoneware (I never told him, so he doesn't know. I was gracious about it).

Absolutely right about the Pyroceram and the Borosilicate used in the old days.

Another place to find great old Corning pieces is in thrift stores, just research how to read the labels on the bottom, and you will know the era from which the piece came. I have seen/purchased so many different styles and patterns over the years, for next to nothing.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,464
Registered: ‎09-22-2010

I had a 4 cup Pyrex measuring cup shatter in the microwave while melting chocolate. What a mess!

Super Contributor
Posts: 429
Registered: ‎03-10-2010
On 3/12/2015 suzyQ3 said:

Here's some info I have posted in the past about Pyrex and Anchor Hocking that points out the change to a cheaper and potentially dangerous forumla:

For anyone who wants an UNBIASED account of the development and changes in Pyrex and Anchor Hocking, it would behoove them to read the Consumer Reports article entitled "Glass Bakeware That Shatters" in its January 2011 issue and not depend solely on the manufacturer's own website.

The Consumer Reports in-depth five-page analysis was a year in the making and includes the history of the glassware, the results of their lab tests on the current Pyrex and Anchor Hocking products made in the U.S. and those made in Europe, a series of interviews with people severely injured from shattered glass bakeware, suggestions for consumers' safety when using the bakeware, and a plea for government action, primarily because the two companies have been reluctant to address the problems but instead have taken a "blame the victim" stance.

Yes, World Kitchen does claim that Pyrex has consistently been made of soda lime glass for 60 years. However, Sarah Horvath, a Corning spokewoman, states that Corning made Pyrex out of both soda lime and borosilicate before selling to World Kitchen in 1998. And a former executive scientist with Corning, P. Bruce Adams, says that borosilicate was still being used by Pyrex when he retired in 1987. So it is not at all clear when the switch took place.

The important point is that strengthened or not, the cheaper soda lime version tested much more poorly than did the more expensive borosilicate glass, which by the way, is still made in Europe by the company that bought the rights from Pyrex in 1994.

This information is not really new, but it is delineated clearly and thoroughly in this Consumer Reports article. It is worth reading before deciding to buy Pyrex or Anchor Hocking glass bakeware. And the sidebar on reducing the risks if one does decide to buy and use the product is invaluable.

A google search of "Pyrex dangers" will verify this information.

Actually I see what you are saying re Consumer Reports and I have no idea where they got their information because several years ago..probably 2008/9 I called World Kitchen and spoke to a production supervisor who told me that when they took over Pyrex from Corning in 1998 they changed to soda lime glass production.

The statement about Pyrex being made for 60 years of Soda lime is an absolute lie and obviously it was made by someone that wanted to blow off any possible controversy.

Can you imagine how many lawsuits there WOULD have been just from the HighSchool and College science classes let alone the research and clinical medical labs over the last 60+ years if Pyrex test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??x test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??

Any people wonder why I don't trust Consumer Reports..{#emotions_dlg.thumbdown}

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,686
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
On 3/12/2015 4uthebest said:
On 3/12/2015 suzyQ3 said:

Here's some info I have posted in the past about Pyrex and Anchor Hocking that points out the change to a cheaper and potentially dangerous forumla:

For anyone who wants an UNBIASED account of the development and changes in Pyrex and Anchor Hocking, it would behoove them to read the Consumer Reports article entitled "Glass Bakeware That Shatters" in its January 2011 issue and not depend solely on the manufacturer's own website.

The Consumer Reports in-depth five-page analysis was a year in the making and includes the history of the glassware, the results of their lab tests on the current Pyrex and Anchor Hocking products made in the U.S. and those made in Europe, a series of interviews with people severely injured from shattered glass bakeware, suggestions for consumers' safety when using the bakeware, and a plea for government action, primarily because the two companies have been reluctant to address the problems but instead have taken a "blame the victim" stance.

Yes, World Kitchen does claim that Pyrex has consistently been made of soda lime glass for 60 years. However, Sarah Horvath, a Corning spokewoman, states that Corning made Pyrex out of both soda lime and borosilicate before selling to World Kitchen in 1998. And a former executive scientist with Corning, P. Bruce Adams, says that borosilicate was still being used by Pyrex when he retired in 1987. So it is not at all clear when the switch took place.

The important point is that strengthened or not, the cheaper soda lime version tested much more poorly than did the more expensive borosilicate glass, which by the way, is still made in Europe by the company that bought the rights from Pyrex in 1994.

This information is not really new, but it is delineated clearly and thoroughly in this Consumer Reports article. It is worth reading before deciding to buy Pyrex or Anchor Hocking glass bakeware. And the sidebar on reducing the risks if one does decide to buy and use the product is invaluable.

A google search of "Pyrex dangers" will verify this information.

Actually I see what you are saying re Consumer Reports and I have no idea where they got their information because several years ago..probably 2008/9 I called World Kitchen and spoke to a production supervisor who told me that when they took over Pyrex from Corning in 1998 they changed to soda lime glass production.

The statement about Pyrex being made for 60 years of Soda lime is an absolute lie and obviously it was made by someone that wanted to blow off any possible controversy.

Can you imagine how many lawsuits there WOULD have been just from the HighSchool and College science classes let alone the research and clinical medical labs over the last 60+ years if Pyrex test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??x test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??

Any people wonder why I don't trust Consumer Reports..{#emotions_dlg.thumbdown}

I have more faith in the CR statement that it is unclear as to when they switched over solely to soda lime, which is corroborated by other credible sources, that I would in a spokesperson from the company, who just might being trying to defend the current use of this cheaper formula.

As for vessels used for research, I have no clue as to the formula of glass used.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
Valued Contributor
Posts: 679
Registered: ‎01-07-2014
On 3/12/2015 ECBG said:

Hairline cracks and chips that compromise the glaze can harbor salmonella, and all manner of bacteria which leaches into the food. You won't find anyone who hasn't had Serve Safe certification using anything like that.

Pyrex is solid glass. There is no glaze. You are thinking of stoneware.
Super Contributor
Posts: 429
Registered: ‎03-10-2010
On 3/13/2015 suzyQ3 said:
On 3/12/2015 4uthebest said:
On 3/12/2015 suzyQ3 said:

Here's some info I have posted in the past about Pyrex and Anchor Hocking that points out the change to a cheaper and potentially dangerous forumla:

For anyone who wants an UNBIASED account of the development and changes in Pyrex and Anchor Hocking, it would behoove them to read the Consumer Reports article entitled "Glass Bakeware That Shatters" in its January 2011 issue and not depend solely on the manufacturer's own website.

The Consumer Reports in-depth five-page analysis was a year in the making and includes the history of the glassware, the results of their lab tests on the current Pyrex and Anchor Hocking products made in the U.S. and those made in Europe, a series of interviews with people severely injured from shattered glass bakeware, suggestions for consumers' safety when using the bakeware, and a plea for government action, primarily because the two companies have been reluctant to address the problems but instead have taken a "blame the victim" stance.

Yes, World Kitchen does claim that Pyrex has consistently been made of soda lime glass for 60 years. However, Sarah Horvath, a Corning spokewoman, states that Corning made Pyrex out of both soda lime and borosilicate before selling to World Kitchen in 1998. And a former executive scientist with Corning, P. Bruce Adams, says that borosilicate was still being used by Pyrex when he retired in 1987. So it is not at all clear when the switch took place.

The important point is that strengthened or not, the cheaper soda lime version tested much more poorly than did the more expensive borosilicate glass, which by the way, is still made in Europe by the company that bought the rights from Pyrex in 1994.

This information is not really new, but it is delineated clearly and thoroughly in this Consumer Reports article. It is worth reading before deciding to buy Pyrex or Anchor Hocking glass bakeware. And the sidebar on reducing the risks if one does decide to buy and use the product is invaluable.

A google search of "Pyrex dangers" will verify this information.

Actually I see what you are saying re Consumer Reports and I have no idea where they got their information because several years ago..probably 2008/9 I called World Kitchen and spoke to a production supervisor who told me that when they took over Pyrex from Corning in 1998 they changed to soda lime glass production.

The statement about Pyrex being made for 60 years of Soda lime is an absolute lie and obviously it was made by someone that wanted to blow off any possible controversy.

Can you imagine how many lawsuits there WOULD have been just from the HighSchool and College science classes let alone the research and clinical medical labs over the last 60+ years if Pyrex test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??x test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??

Any people wonder why I don't trust Consumer Reports..{#emotions_dlg.thumbdown}

I have more faith in the CR statement that it is unclear as to when they switched over solely to soda lime, which is corroborated by other credible sources, that I would in a spokesperson from the company, who just might being trying to defend the current use of this cheaper formula.

As for vessels used for research, I have no clue as to the formula of glass used.

I don't.. I purposely spoke to a worker bee as opposed to a queen.

As far as Research, High School, Colleges, Clinical & Diagnostic labs, as I alluded to before the glass used is Borosilicate never SodaLime for test tubes, beakers, and flasks, as well as distillation apparati.

I have seen in over 50 years in these environments multiple times where the Pyrex glassware due to insult suffered cracks which we then trashed. If a test tube or flask/beaker broke there were a few pieces not like thousands of shards that you would see from dropping a Corelle item and many soda lime pieces.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,686
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
On 3/13/2015 4uthebest said:
On 3/13/2015 suzyQ3 said:
On 3/12/2015 4uthebest said:
On 3/12/2015 suzyQ3 said:

Here's some info I have posted in the past about Pyrex and Anchor Hocking that points out the change to a cheaper and potentially dangerous forumla:

For anyone who wants an UNBIASED account of the development and changes in Pyrex and Anchor Hocking, it would behoove them to read the Consumer Reports article entitled "Glass Bakeware That Shatters" in its January 2011 issue and not depend solely on the manufacturer's own website.

The Consumer Reports in-depth five-page analysis was a year in the making and includes the history of the glassware, the results of their lab tests on the current Pyrex and Anchor Hocking products made in the U.S. and those made in Europe, a series of interviews with people severely injured from shattered glass bakeware, suggestions for consumers' safety when using the bakeware, and a plea for government action, primarily because the two companies have been reluctant to address the problems but instead have taken a "blame the victim" stance.

Yes, World Kitchen does claim that Pyrex has consistently been made of soda lime glass for 60 years. However, Sarah Horvath, a Corning spokewoman, states that Corning made Pyrex out of both soda lime and borosilicate before selling to World Kitchen in 1998. And a former executive scientist with Corning, P. Bruce Adams, says that borosilicate was still being used by Pyrex when he retired in 1987. So it is not at all clear when the switch took place.

The important point is that strengthened or not, the cheaper soda lime version tested much more poorly than did the more expensive borosilicate glass, which by the way, is still made in Europe by the company that bought the rights from Pyrex in 1994.

This information is not really new, but it is delineated clearly and thoroughly in this Consumer Reports article. It is worth reading before deciding to buy Pyrex or Anchor Hocking glass bakeware. And the sidebar on reducing the risks if one does decide to buy and use the product is invaluable.

A google search of "Pyrex dangers" will verify this information.

Actually I see what you are saying re Consumer Reports and I have no idea where they got their information because several years ago..probably 2008/9 I called World Kitchen and spoke to a production supervisor who told me that when they took over Pyrex from Corning in 1998 they changed to soda lime glass production.

The statement about Pyrex being made for 60 years of Soda lime is an absolute lie and obviously it was made by someone that wanted to blow off any possible controversy.

Can you imagine how many lawsuits there WOULD have been just from the HighSchool and College science classes let alone the research and clinical medical labs over the last 60+ years if Pyrex test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??x test tubes, beakers, flasks, distillation vessels, etc were made of Soda Lime glass. ??

Any people wonder why I don't trust Consumer Reports..{#emotions_dlg.thumbdown}

I have more faith in the CR statement that it is unclear as to when they switched over solely to soda lime, which is corroborated by other credible sources, that I would in a spokesperson from the company, who just might being trying to defend the current use of this cheaper formula.

As for vessels used for research, I have no clue as to the formula of glass used.

I don't.. I purposely spoke to a worker bee as opposed to a queen.

As far as Research, High School, Colleges, Clinical & Diagnostic labs, as I alluded to before the glass used is Borosilicate never SodaLime for test tubes, beakers, and flasks, as well as distillation apparati.

I have seen in over 50 years in these environments multiple times where the Pyrex glassware due to insult suffered cracks which we then trashed. If a test tube or flask/beaker broke there were a few pieces not like thousands of shards that you would see from dropping a Corelle item and many soda lime pieces.

Maybe the lab products were made from the more expensive borosilicate. That really doesn't change the fact that it is undetermined as to when the formula for consumer products changed.

And really, it doesn't matter. It's now the soda lime formula. And I won't use either Pyrex or Anchor Hocking because of the potential dangers so well illustrated and detailed by Consumer Reports in a lengthy article three years ago.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland