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Esteemed Contributor
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Registered: ‎05-15-2016

Starting salary for teachers in NC is 32,000 and that was with a recent 4% raise that was difficult to get support for. 

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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Some of these anecdotes sound quite unrealistic. 

 

I teach in a well-to-do suburb of Los Angeles and there is NO shortage of teachers. In fact, it is quite the opposite.  A brand new teacher in my district starts with $40,000.

 

In the city of LA itself, as in many other CA cities, there is a shortage of teachers, even though their starting salary is a little higher at $45,000.  

~ house cat ~
los angeles, california
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These are May 2018 statistics.

 

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~ house cat ~
los angeles, california
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No, teachers are not scarce in our area, never were. Teaching was a second career for my husband and it took him years before he was hired as a full time high school math teacher. It's not like he didn't have experience, he was a mathematician for 15 years at NSA  before he got a teaching certificate. You actually have to know someone or have a connection to one of the administrators to get a full time job. If you graduated from the same college as the principal did, you were a shoe in. The one school my husband subbed at, all the teachers graduated from Penn State. Get this, my husband got hired because the superintendent was a brother, if you know what I mean.

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Registered: ‎05-25-2016

In our state, teachers have just five years after their first year of teaching to complete their masters degrees at a cost of $30,000 or more. Many teachers are still paying off college loans when they start their next degree.  

 

There is no tenure in my state. We depend on property taxes for public schools, so teachers realize they might not get their contract renewed at the end of the school year depending on state funding, which has dropped, and whether or not levies pass. 

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Registered: ‎03-11-2010

From what I read in the news, there is a shortage of teachers here in SW FL where they actually build new schools, a new high school in Bonita Springs has just opened. DH was a school teacher for 32 years back in central NY. We had some lean years on that salary, but made it through. DH taught summer school the last 25 years. His pension is really good and with our social security have a good life down here.

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Registered: ‎03-11-2010

There is a lot of competition for teaching jobs where I live. Often teachers take aide positions or coach sports to help them get in the door.

 

I don’t know any elem teachers who teach only 4 classes a day.  With regard to not getting up on snow days, closing school is the decision of the superintendent. Liability is a concern of late so schools close rather than chance a bus accident on snowy roads. Snow days must be made up to satisfy the contract of a certain number of student days in a school year. Otherwise state funding could be jeopardized.

 

My state still has union representation so teachers’ salaries are higher than those states that held marches a few months back.  

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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

In the crooked state of Illinois the teacher's pension fund has been robbed for the last 40 years by the state Legislature. They just passed a law where starting pay for a teacher is $40,000.00. But, they didn't bother to fund it, so that will just get added to our property tax bill. And there you have one reason teachers are not respected here. When your home is over assessed in order to get to the amount of money the county has to have, you look at your bill and see who is taking the most from you. Here the school systems combined take 63% of the tax bill. That, of course, will go up to make that $40,000.00 starting pay. Our teacher's have tenure, and the teacher's union do this little trick of waiting to even start trying to get a contract until school has started for the year. Then, out they go on strick, and now parents of young kids are over the barrel trying to find babysitters. They always claim "it's not the money", and "it's for the kids". Yep, it's for the money, and the only kids that really benefit are the kids living in the home with the teacher. I don't hate teachers, but the state needs to figure out another way to pay for them. And I do really dislike that union. They have gotten to the point they run the state. What the union demands, they get. A collective bargaining just rewards the lazy and insults the hard working. When everyone gets a raise no matter their job performance, that's just wrong. And once on tenure, there's no getting rid of a bad teacher. The school board can't afford the kind of lawyers the union can. It's a no win for the taxpayer. All the days off doesn't help either. Hot days, snow days, early release Wednesdays, threat of snow days, it makes the schools look weak. No other job gets those days off, not to mention all the Monday holidays. They stretch the school year out to 9 months, but they only go 8 months with all the days off.

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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

@Kachina624

 

yes.

 

Our district hired a few from there. My child had one of the teachers. They were fantastic!

 

Because of the shortages, there is an alernative path program to obtain a credential. (as long as you have a BA/BS)

 

We have shortages because of the low pay. Start off in low 30's.

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@Ruby Laine wrote:

In our state, teachers have just five years after their first year of teaching to complete their masters degrees at a cost of $30,000 or more. Many teachers are still paying off college loans when they start their next degree.  

 

There is no tenure in my state. We depend on property taxes for public schools, so teachers realize they might not get their contract renewed at the end of the school year depending on state funding, which has dropped, and whether or not levies pass. 


 

Here they don't require a masters. And the pay difference isn't worth it for the huge loans. It's only worth it if you plan to be a principal etc.