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Esteemed Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@drizzella wrote:

@Jtdmum wrote:

in overabundance and making 76k+ tenured.  Full benefits, no summer work and don't have to get up when it snows.  Never teach more than 4 classes daily.  

 

I picked the wrong profession. 



That is similar to our area. My girlfriend taught from 10 am - 2 pm. She started at $75,000 with full benefits for her family. 

Many tenured teachers are making $100,000+. And their pensions are out of this world. 


PS - I wanted to add the $75,000 starting salary was almost 10 years ago.


Teachers in my local school district (and the surrounding districts too) are making similar salaries.  Seasoned teachers are making well over 100k and when they retire their pensions are 2/3 of their last salaries in addition to SS.

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Registered: ‎03-14-2010

@drizzella wrote:

@Jtdmum wrote:

in overabundance and making 76k+ tenured.  Full benefits, no summer work and don't have to get up when it snows.  Never teach more than 4 classes daily.  

 

I picked the wrong profession. 



That is similar to our area. My girlfriend taught from 10 am - 2 pm. She started at $75,000 with full benefits for her family. 

Many tenured teachers are making $100,000+. And their pensions are out of this world. 


PS - I wanted to add the $75,000 starting salary was almost 10 years ago.


How interesting. A quick Google check brought me to a website that listed starting salaries by state. NJ was the highest at $48,600 as of 2013. The average salary was highest in NY at $75k. No one is getting rich being a teacher. 

Www.teacherportal.com

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  Teachers in my area are paid quite well.Starting salary is in the mid 60’s.There is no shortage of teachers.In fact there are more teachers than jobs.

   Many of the teachers who retire here collect pensions of over $100,000!! That includes lifetime medical/ dental benefits. A lot of teachers retire once they max out their pensions & get jobs in other districts.This way they collect both a pension & a large salary.

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@house_cat   I teach in L.A-Eagle Rock and live in Glendale.  LAUSD has "pool teachers" right now  who have been displaced and temporarily placed at a school because they are contracted.  If positions open up we will have to hire them before the newbys coming up.. There is no teacher shortage in the district.  But my kids who are 28 and 32 did not want to be teachers nor did any of their friends. It is no longer a desireable profession.

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@kjae wrote:

@house_cat   I teach in L.A-Eagle Rock and live in Glendale.  LAUSD has "pool teachers" right now  who have been displaced and temporarily placed at a school because they are contracted.  If positions open up we will have to hire them before the newbys coming up.. There is no teacher shortage in the district.  But my kids who are 28 and 32 did not want to be teachers nor did any of their friends. It is no longer a desireable profession.


In your experience, are teachers starting out at 75k and retiring with 6 figure pensions, all health benefits paid?

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My area doesn't have a teacher shortage, but then I live in a vacation destination.

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@bathina   No.  I have been teaching for 44 years and I am still not making the 75,000.  I know they figure in the health benefits but if you are over 65 when you retire you  have to take the medicare-even tho LAUSD has "lifetime benefits".  The only thing I will get is prescription benefits and they MAY help with the supplemental-and again LAUSD is one of the better districts as far a benefits.

 

I know of some principals who retire at nearly 100,000 but they have a totally different formula than teachers and make more $ to begin with.  And here if I retire I have to wait for 6 months before I can work-then I can only earn a limited amount of $ if I go back to work as a part-time co-ordinator to help a school out.  I do not know how one of the posters said retirees are getting a full salary working for another district and getting their pension.  That is just not how it works in California.

Basically you get 60ish% of your salary at retirement.  I cannot pay my bills on that, thus I am still working after all of these years.

You cannot get another public school job and collect your pension.

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Registered: ‎03-30-2010

@Kachina624

 

The problem is that too many tax dollars for education go towards all the levels of administrators.  We think our tax dollars are going to the classroom, but that is not the case.  Elementary schools have various principals and staffers.  Besides that if schools have busses they cost a fortune to service not to mention gas. 

 

Get rid of a few administrators and cut down on busses and teachers could be paid more. 

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Registered: ‎03-28-2011

My daughter grew up in SW FL and earned a Master's degree.  When she graduated from the University of FL in 2011 FL wasn't hiring teachers.  She took a job on a cruise ship working with children for 2 years then came back to FL.   She then decided she wanted to move out of state so started looking for jobs.

 

She found her current position on craigslist in Clark County NV, Las Vegas.  They had a severe teacher shortage and hired her over the phone after receiving her credentials.  She has been teaching 4th/5th grade in a Title I school for 5 years, starting her 6th.  Her salary is around $40,000 ish.  Her insurance benefits change each year and have progressively gotten worse.  Clark Co. employees don't contribute to social securty, but, pay into their own retirement plan which she assumes will be defunct from misuse by the time she would need it.  

 

Last year she was  set on giving up teaching due to all the paperwork required by the State.  She must keep meticulous records and do reports on students that nobody every really looks at.  It all gets filed away just to have in the record.  Her class size has been 36+ most years and in a small portable.   The school didn't have enough books, computers, desks, etc. for all the students.  Last year an addition was added to the school and the portables are gone.  She hopes they get more of what is needed for the students to thrive.

 

She is required to be on a committee and most of the work is on her own time and not paid, just the actual meeting.  She also spends a lot of her own time on the above mentioned reports as there is not time to complete them during her teahing hours.

 

Those teachers making $100.000 must be in really high cost of living areas.  Teachers I know in various states don't make that much.

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Thank you for the clarification @kjae. I thought it sounded off-base, especially the starting salaries and the 6 figure pensions. If that were the case, people would line up to take the job! I have always felt that teachers are the unsung heroes in society, especially after seeing a dear friend buy school supplies, socks, coats and sanitary items for her students while she struggled to pay her own bills. Thank YOU for what you do.