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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,583
Registered: ‎08-08-2013

I always keep AZO in the house.  I had a UTI just about two weeks ago.  I took the AZO, which stopped the symptoms immediately and called my doctor.  The girl who answered the phone said she would call in Bactrim/Septra for me and to bring in a specimen as soon as I could.  

 

The Rx was ready in an hour.  It was picked up in a few hours because the AZO took care of the symptoms, there was no rush to get it.  She called in 14 pills/2x a day for 7 days.  After I was finished with it, I brought in a specimen and the next day they called back and told me it was "negative"..... So, the Bactrim worked.

 

I have found that they call in Bactrim first and then, when the culture comes back, they might change the antibiotic, according to what strain the culture is.  Fortunately, this time, Bactrim worked.

 

But, I never heard of any doctor letting a patient wait. It's not like you're asking for a narcotic.  They can call in a Rx right away and then tell you to come in as soon as you can.  I hope you are feeling better and got the right Rx.

 

ETA:  Back in the day,, they used to call in Pyridium, which is the same as AZO today.  Just a FYI

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,331
Registered: ‎08-20-2012

@lolakimono wrote:

@Renata22

Get D-Mannose from your health food store and drink a lot of water.  

-----------------

      I agree!  I always used to use AZO, but  was told by doc that it can raise blood pressure.  

      D-Mannose has worked for me...always have some in med box!  Also stay away from coffee, tea, coke etc.  Heating pad also helps....all of these until you can get to a doc for prescription .

Honored Contributor
Posts: 31,038
Registered: ‎05-10-2010

You don't know if it's a UTI.  Go to one of the Urgent care center for an exam and urinalysis.

Super Contributor
Posts: 483
Registered: ‎04-08-2010

Go to your local Med Stop or urgent care center. Also, drink plenty of cranberry juice routinely to help prevention.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,357
Registered: ‎03-23-2010

Water, water and more water.  This is after you get a diagnosis of a UTI.  Get yourself to your PCP or an urgent care center.  Don't assume.

Super Contributor
Posts: 484
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

@sophiamarie wrote:

I always keep AZO in the house.  I had a UTI just about two weeks ago.  I took the AZO, which stopped the symptoms immediately and called my doctor.  The girl who answered the phone said she would call in Bactrim/Septra for me and to bring in a specimen as soon as I could.  

 

The Rx was ready in an hour.  It was picked up in a few hours because the AZO took care of the symptoms, there was no rush to get it.  She called in 14 pills/2x a day for 7 days.  After I was finished with it, I brought in a specimen and the next day they called back and told me it was "negative"..... So, the Bactrim worked.

 

I have found that they call in Bactrim first and then, when the culture comes back, they might change the antibiotic, according to what strain the culture is.  Fortunately, this time, Bactrim worked.

 

But, I never heard of any doctor letting a patient wait. It's not like you're asking for a narcotic.  They can call in a Rx right away and then tell you to come in as soon as you can.  I hope you are feeling better and got the right Rx.

 

ETA:  Back in the day,, they used to call in Pyridium, which is the same as AZO today.  Just a FYI


UGH.  This is HORRIBLE medicine.  The culture should be sent BEFORE the antibiotic is started because otherwise we have no idea whether you had a bacterial infection in the first place.  Secondly, Azo will make doing a urine dip in the office impossible because it makes the urine orange and therefore the dip is useless.  Now we have no idea if the urine is clear or not and must wait for the culture. Hold off on the Azo until after you see the doctor and give a sample.  Lastly, calling in an antibotic without an exam is poor medicine.  There are a million causes of dysuria, not just UTI.  While it may be "convenient" to the patient, this is how things get missed.  Or treated incorrectly. If you have an MD who simply calls antibiotics in over the phone without examining you, you have a crappy doctor and need a new one.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,686
Registered: ‎03-16-2010
Thank you so much everyone. I really appreciate all the advice. I used to get these all the time but it’s been so long since I had one, I thought I’d never have another one. This one is particularly nasty. Never had some of these symptoms before. I have been looking all over for home remedies. I drank more water & it’s way better today. If I can avoid antibiotics I always will. I’ve tried azo in the past & it just didn’t work for me. I picked up a few natural things today & will try. The doctor situation is complicated right now. My insurance changed & have to find a new doc. Our insurance is through a hospital & the urgent care associated with that hospital just closed down. I will go to another one if I have to, it’s just way more expensive. I hate that I lost my former doc. Really loved her.
Anyway, sorry to babble on. I just really do appreciate all of you who took the time to answer me. I’ll let you know how it goes.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,491
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

@Renata22  Your last post is the exact reason you need to get into a doctor (and not urgent care) sooner rather than later.

 

As you say, this is worse than you've ever had AND symptoms you've never had before means that something else may be going on rather than or in addition to a UTI.

 

 

===================================
QVC Shopper - 1993

# IAMTEAMWEN
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,491
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

I know the orange prescription stuff interferes with the urine dip test, I don't know if AZO does.

 

I know Uribel does not, although the blue is offputting. 

===================================
QVC Shopper - 1993

# IAMTEAMWEN
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,141
Registered: ‎12-08-2013

Not to scare anyone but a uti should be dealt with immediately. I have a relative that had a uti and ended up in the i.c.u. with sepsis.  This may be an extreme situation but it points out why an infection should never be ignored. 

Thankfully my relative is responding to antibiotics and will hopefully be out of the hospital soon.