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@Drythe wrote:

@QueenDanceALot wrote:

@Drythe wrote:

 

 

I pray they will all go this way, but being a Southerner, I am afraid to believe.


I am originally from New York, and still called a "Yankee" by some where I have lived for the past 25 years, a "neutral" state during the Civil War, but still had a slave trade.

 

The city voted this week to remove a couple of Confederate Statues from an area known downtown as "Cheapside".  It's claim to fame is that it was where slaves were sold.

 

The hate groups let it be known that they will be demonstrating here and I was having a conversation last nite at dinner with a few friends about what we and others we know will do at that time.  My friends did bring up a very good point, that these groups are not looking for recognition so much as they are looking for a fight.  I think I am leaning toward agreement with those I know who say the best course of action is to ignore them, don't engage, don't give them what they're looking for.

 

I hope it's not violent when they show up.  I hope they have no eyes or ears directed their way.

 

 


@QueenDanceALot

 

@Drythe wrote:

 

I pray they will all go this way, but being a Southerner, I am afraid to believe.

 

 

Hello KLWT,

 

Since you quoted me, I want say, I think we must NOT ignore this behavior.  It should be witnessed, so that there will be clarity in the future about what happened.  I do agree that one should not engage.

 

I hope they will all be as well managed as Boston.

 

Best.


@Drythe

 

Oh, don't misunderstand me.  I absolutely don't think their behavior should be ignored.  I just think that confrontation is what they want and that should be avoided.  I think ignoring them while they are "demonstrating" by not engaging them will speak volumes.  We should all speak out against them and bear witness to their existence, though.

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Closeup of what's on the glass. Very sobering indeed  

 

new-england-holocaust-memorial.jpg

"If you really want to shock the world unleash your kindness"
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That's a magnificent photo @Greeneyedlady21 !

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@Greeneyedlady21

 

What is that?  Writing? Numbers?

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@Noel7 Yes it's actually said to be six million random numbers. Each glass tower represents a major death camp.

 

At the base of each tower is a grate, steam rises up from pits under the grates via smoldering coals.

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There are six million random numbers to represent the six million who died. Here's more about the architecture -- fascinating:

 

The Memorial is designed around six luminous glass towers, each reaching 54 feet high, and each lit internally from top to bottom. The number six has many meanings here: the millions of Jews killed in the Holocaust; the names of the six main death camps; a row of memorial candles; and the six years, 1939-1945, during which the infamous “Final Solution,” the most deadly phase of the Holocaust, took place. In addition, millions of numbers are etched in the glass, representing the infamous tattoos inflected on many of the victims’ arms.

 

From architect Stanley Saitowitz’s description of the Memorial:

The memorial to darkness is built with light. The construction began on Yom HaShoah, Holocaust Memorial Day. | The horror of the Holocaust is reenacted in the brutal cutting of all the trees on half the site. These stumps remain.

 

Six pits are dug and lined with black concrete. | At the bottom of each pit is a glowing fire.

 

Six glass towers are raised above. | Etched on the glass towers are MILLIONS of numbers that flicker with light. | On the walls of each tower, a memory of a survivor from the camp is etched. | Between the towers, a line of text locates the Holocaust in historical context.

 

At the two entries are didactic panels, one outlining the chronology of events that led to the Wannsee Conference and the horrific propositioning of establishing the factories of death this memorial marks, the other quoting Pastor Martin Niemoller, who placed responsibility for such even in the hands of every individual.

 

As visitors walk along this path, entering the towers, they are tattooed with the shadows of numbers, and trapped momentarily in a theater of horror.

 

On the black granite ramps is incised REMEMBER. | Each of the six burning chambers is named after one of the six death camps constructed in Poland, factories whose product was death: CHELMNO. TREBLINKA. MAJDANEK.  SOBIBOR. AUSCHWITZ-BIRKENAU. BELZEC.

 

At the scale of the city, the memorial has another role: path, colonnade and frame create urban space, defining edges and relationships with the buildings and city beyond. These six towers are emblems of faith, a covenant of trust that memorializes a collective evil.

 

They are towers of hope and aspiration.

 

source: http://www.nehm.org/the-memorial/design-of-the-memorial/


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
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@suzyQ3 Thank you for posting that. Walking through it, I really can't describe how it feels.

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@Greeneyedlady21 wrote:

@suzyQ3 Thank you for posting that. Walking through it, I really can't describe how it feels.


@Greeneyedlady21, I know.

 

I've always been like that about those times -- World War II and the Holocaust. I will never be able truly to wrap my head around such an event. Yet I'll always remember that it wasn't just one person.

 

As experiments have borne out, so-called normal humans can be capable of the most heinous acts for some of the most base reasons. Although appealing in that it let's us off the hook, I think that it's dangerous to ascribe such evil only to one person and ignore complicity.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
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@Greeneyedlady21 wrote:

@Noel7 Yes it's actually said to be six million random numbers. Each glass tower represents a major death camp.

 

At the base of each tower is a grate, steam rises up from pits under the grates via smoldering coals.


@Greeneyedlady21

 

Thank you so much for explaining and describing, it's an amazing structure.