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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,878
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Cats3000 wrote:

I have a piece of advice:  Make sure you have an attorney representing you in the purchase and closing on the house.  Do not rely on real estate agents or title clerks; they are not lawyers.  Do not rely on the seller's attorney; that individual does not represent you and won't have your legal interests to advance.  We would never make a real estate purchase or sale without an attorney representing us, and only us.

 

Many years ago, we purchased a house from a seller who had multiple financial problems.  Our attorney made sure that none of the seller's financial problems affected us.  Several months later we received an electric bill that was for service before we owned the house.  We turned the bill over to our attorney and she took care of it.

 

 


@Cats3000  ..  I am a Real Estate Attorney in New Jersey.  I cannot agree with you more.   I am tired of Real Estate agents misinforming my clients.  They do very little with the exception of hounding me about when we are scheduled to close.    Some don't even handle obtaining a CCO and Smoke Detector Certificate... which for the thousands of dollars they are getting should be the least they could do.   I am currently working with one particular Real Estate agent who has had me and my client (who lives out of State) deal with getting the CCO and Smoke Detector Certificate for two different properties.   Since there is  Realtor involved it should be his job,,  It is not a lawyer's job to do it but I feel so bad for my client that I had to step in.  I complained to the agents broker ... to no avail.  In fact he told me that CCOs and Smoke Detector Certificates in NJ have been waived in NJ.   Absolutely  NOT true!  Ironically people complain about the fees attorneys charge (which is a small fraction of what Realtors get while the attorneys do all the work) yet having no problem paying the Real Estate commissions!!!!

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,955
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Besides a real estate lawyer, get a good house inspector who will thoroughly go through the house and give a list of what needs fixing, etc.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 959
Registered: ‎03-06-2020

@gloriajean  I don't think it's a bad idea at all. DH and I will not live in a condo or townhouse ever again. The one we had was turned into a rental and a single family home is exactly what works for us. 

 

Regarding buying right now:

 

I now own my parents home (both are deceased; my mother died last month). We have gone back and forth on whether to rent or sale. In my state, Real Estate is considered a necessary business so Realtors are showing homes, title companies are open, new home construction is busy as are remodeling companies. Open Houses are still happening as well. Check as to what your state guidelines are. 

 

We are not selling as the taxes are low, the house is in mint condition and rent for a home such as theirs starts at $2000 a month. Home prices are not going down either; homes sell for or a tad more than asking price and usually have a contract the first week of it being on the market; low-balling just ticks off the seller. There is also a demand to rent due to their location and people not wanting to take on a mortgage with unemployment possibilities. For now, renting their house is the best choice. 

"Coming to ya from Florida"
Super Contributor
Posts: 492
Registered: ‎07-21-2017

gloriajean, just to set your expectations about thinking a house will provide you with friendly neighbors, I'm sure you know that's a gamble. Keep in mind that people don't always want to know their neighbors. Good luck to you.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,686
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I hope it it's a small home (under 1500 square feet) and you can hire lawn and snow removal services. That's what I foresee us having to do in our cute ranch home.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,927
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

I would consider having it surveyed. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,193
Registered: ‎05-30-2010

Buying a house for friendly neighbors, as one mentioned isn't a given. If that's a strong pull to buy a house I suggest you look for housing in neighborhoods with people in your age group. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 31,719
Registered: ‎01-08-2011

@Cats3000 wrote:

I have a piece of advice:  Make sure you have an attorney representing you in the purchase and closing on the house.  Do not rely on real estate agents or title clerks; they are not lawyers.  Do not rely on the seller's attorney; that individual does not represent you and won't have your legal interests to advance.  We would never make a real estate purchase or sale without an attorney representing us, and only us.

 

Many years ago, we purchased a house from a seller who had multiple financial problems.  Our attorney made sure that none of the seller's financial problems affected us.  Several months later we received an electric bill that was for service before we owned the house.  We turned the bill over to our attorney and she took care of it.

 

 


@Cats3000 Oh my Girl!!!  Have you EVER gotten that right!!!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,685
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@gloriajean 

 

 

Good for you.   We feel the same way.  We've been renting this house for 18 months since we moved from the east coast to Santa Fe.  We love our rental.   Great location and very Santa Fe style.   We have 2 years left on our lease but will start looking before then.   Our landlords said that if we want to buy just give them plenty of notice and we can go early.  Happy house hunting.   I hope you find just what you are looking for.

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,927
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

when this first started I had a neighbor with a bunch of kids come up and tell me if I ever needed a ride to the store to just come up and ask her  and I said no thank you  but my real answer in my head was how dumb do you think I am ( I have a car and drive)

 

I just agree with the suggestions to look for neighborhoods that have people in your age group.