Reply
Valued Contributor
Posts: 745
Registered: ‎07-26-2019

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.


@KarenQVC wrote:

@Xivambala I know I am.  That is why I am happy @Mindy D  and others post info.

 

I am busy reading polls about who is inclined to take the vaccine and who isn't.  I'll create a profile of who to avoid.  Of course, my profile won't be 100% but it will help.  Unvaccinated people will be considered potentially dangerous until further notice.


I'm not sure of your point. Similarly to the contact tracing that was done earlier in the viruses development, I think something of that sort would be helpful in these cases for everyone. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,024
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

@shoesnbags @You might have to take the J & J vaccine more than once a year. How fast the the virus mutates into strains we need extra protection from could dictate what approach might be necessary to maintain immunity. We are learning as we go along with this virus.
Some virologists and vaccinologists have also proposed making vaccines that would combine with the COVID vaccines to work against SARS, MERS and/or the common human coronaviruses (COVID, actually called SARS-CoV2, is not considered one of the original human coronavirus. The first four human coronaviruses, along with rhinoviruses, cause colds in humans.)




Human coronaviruses were first identified in the mid-1960s. The seven coronaviruses that can infect people are:

Common human coronaviruses

  1. 229E (alpha coronavirus)
  2. NL63 (alpha coronavirus)
  3. OC43 (beta coronavirus)
  4. HKU1 (beta coronavirus)

Other human coronaviruses

  1. MERS-CoV (the beta coronavirus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome, or MERS)
  2. SARS-CoV (the beta coronavirus that causes severe acute respiratory syndrome, or SARS)
  3. SARS-CoV-2 (the novel coronavirus that causes coronavirus disease 2019, or COVID-19)








 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,024
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

[ Edited ]

@happycat wrote:

@scatcat wrote:

What?!

64 million people have received at least 1 shot and 3 vaccinated people got Covid?

 

Shut it down.  It's not working 


More than three people have been reported to have gotten covid who have gotten the shot.

Not sure why the need to be snarky. 


@happycat @scatcat I just thought that this was interesting. No one here has said anything about shutting it down nor has anyone on this thread said the vaccines are not working. I wish more information was released about the cases. I'm interested to know which factors affected their lack of immunity. 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,536
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

@DeltaOne  Yes.  Unfortunately, I think there must be a lot of people who are not aware of this.  

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,536
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

From what I have read and heard from medical professionals since last year, keep your hands away from your face and keep washing your hands.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,817
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

Looks like the vaccine was doing its job....vaccinated people caught it but didn't get very sick.  None had to be hospitalized.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,964
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

@Foxxee 

i don't know anyone who has signed a form. Maybe it varies by state or county. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,432
Registered: ‎10-03-2014

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.


@happygal wrote:

@Foxxee 

i don't know anyone who has signed a form. Maybe it varies by state or county. 


@happygal 

 

I even have to sign a form when I get the flu vaccine giving permission to give it to me.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,302
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

Just this little anecdote, and I have no anecdote as my own and no source for this except Gallup poll.  A friend sent it to me and she did not give a source for the journalism piece. I sent her a message back but I think she was probably at church by that time.

What do frontline health care workers and first responders know about COVID-19 vaccines that politicians and their public health advisers don’t?

According to a Janua ry ana lysis by Gall up, 51 percent of health care workers and first responders polled in December were unconvinced of the merits of getting vaccinated, even if the vaccine “was free, available, FDA approved and 90% effective.”

Gallup found these results especially concerning since those at highest risk of exposure to COVID-19—the professionals required to meet America’s health, safety, and critical economic needs whom the National Academies of Engineering, Science and Medicine define as “Tier 1A workers”—were the likeliest to refuse vacc ination (34 percent).

The frontline workers proved to be as defiant as Gallup’s survey of their intentions anticipated. In California, over half of Tehama County’s hospital workers at St. Elizabeth Community Hospital, an estimated 50 percent of frontline workers in Riverside County, and 20 percent to 40 percent in L.A. County refused the vaccine, according to a report in the L os Ang eles Times.

In Georgia, according to an estimate in the A tlanta Journ al-Con stitution, only 30 percent of health care workers have been inoculated. In Ohio, Gov. Mike DeWin e reported that 60  percent of nursing-home workers refused the vaccine. In Texas, the Texa s Tribu ne reported in February that home-health and assisted-living agencies may not be able to service their clients because so many caregivers are refusing to be vaccinated. A  CDC sur vey of skilled-nursing facilities published in early February found that fewer than 40 percent of staff took at least one dose of a CO VID-19 vaccin e.

Outside the United States, frontline workers are likewise skeptical. On March 2, Reu ters reported that at most half of the nursing staff in Switzerland’s medical sector, only 30 percent of the staff at Germany’s BeneVit Group care-home operator, and about half of the health workers in French care homes were willing to be vaccinated.

PB S on the sam e day repo rted that since “India started administering the second vaccine dose two weeks ago, half of the frontline workers and nearly 40 percent of health care workers have not shown up.” In Canada, CTV provid ed an anecdotal report that many long-term-care workers in Montreal are “flat-out refusing” to be inoculated.

For health care workers around the world, their dilemma is who to believe. Their government employers and the pharmaceutical companies, who insist the vaccines’ benefits far outweigh the risks? Or their own eyes?

Many frontline workers see first-hand those who fall sick or die after receiving a COVID-19 vaccine, and in the absence of independent analyses judge for themselves whether the vaccine is implicated. They noted 23 nursing-home deaths in Norway and hundreds of hospitalizations in Israel following vaccination.

Frontline workers also suffer from vaccinations themselves. As Reuters reported in February in an article entitled “AstraZeneca Vaccine Faces Resistance in Europe After Health Workers Suffer Side-Effects,” the adverse effects hitting health care workers have unexpectedly left large numbers unable to work, forcing hospitals to scramble to maintain services.

In France, the safety agency advised hospitals to stagger the inoculation of team members, to avoid disabling team functions.

In Sweden, two of the country’s 21 health care regions paused vaccinating their staff after 25 percent of the vaccinated suffered fever or flu-like symptoms.

In Austria, inoculations with a batch of vaccines were suspended after one vaccinated nurse died and another required hospitalization.

The Wall Street Journal reports that, to avoid getting vaccinated, half of the health professionals scheduled in the German state of Saarland failed to show up for their appointment.

In response to the many concerns raised by frontline workers, the vaccine manufacturers, care-home operators, and the public-health authorities in all these countries offer bland reassurances, such as AstraZeneca’s statement that “the reactions reported are as we would expect” and the German Health Minister’s claim that “I would be vaccinated with it immediately.”

They also plan a plethora of public education campaigns. Partnership for Medicaid Home-Based Care, an industry advocacy group, launched a “Be Wise, Immunize” campaign to educate its workforce.

And all urge media and social media to be more vigilant in policing negative vaccination news. In offering pointers on how to debunk critics, the Columbia Journalism Review on March 5, told media companies that “The first rule of reporting on mis/disinformation [is] don’t talk about the mis/disinformation” and suggested they “consider the practice of ‘pre-bunking’—that is, actively debunking or anticipating public questions and concerns rather than only reacting once false narratives have been popularized.”

Although studies show that such assurances and public-education campaigns—also known as propaganda—can reduce vaccine hesitancy, Gallup finds their effect is marginal: “The limited COVID-19 vaccine acceptance rates among all occupation groups show little movement since November 2020.”

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) analysis agrees, and concludes that barriers to “staff member vaccination need to be overcome with continued development and implementation of focused communication and outreach strategies.”

Yet the CDC doesn’t explain why continued focused communication and outreach—i.e., more of the same—would overcome worker hesitancy, when workers don’t fully trust the data, or those who deliver the data. To overcome that trust barrier and win over the frontline workers—people who have every incentive to protect themselves—the media would need to lift the censorship, industry would need to subject its studies to independent scrutiny, and all would need to engage in reasoned debate rather than “trust-us” assurances.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,276
Registered: ‎09-18-2010

Re: 3 cases of COVID in fully vaccinated in Hawaii. I have questions.

Thank you for posting this, @NameAlreadyTaken. I find it interesting that I have not seen or heard ANYTHING about this Gallup poll. 

This is why people have distrust, in my opinion. We are cherry picked on what we are told. If the powers that be want us to hear it, the news is saturated with it. If not, its just the luck of the draw if we hear of it or not. 

Anyhow, ty for posting.