Reply
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,785
Registered: ‎12-18-2010
On 3/11/2015 ROMARY 1 said:

Never, never place a 'hot' Pyrex (or other brand) dish on a 'cold' counter! Thousands of exploded chards of glass years ago. ALWAYS PLACE HOT ITEMS ON AN OVEN MIT, THICK TOWEL, THICK PLACE MAT, (and whatever else is thick). Never on a cold counter or cold surface, including cold trivets.

Romary I made that mistake a few weeks ago. It just exploded and bits of glass went all over my kitchen. Thank God I backed up to the sink or I would have gotten some glass on me. It happened so fast. I sure wasn't thinking when I did that.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,178
Registered: ‎09-02-2010

Silicone trivets are wonderful for this. I've also used wood cutting boards.

~~
*Off The Deep End~A very short trip for some!*
Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,436
Registered: ‎03-09-2010
On 3/11/2015 debc said:

Silicone trivets are wonderful for this. I've also used wood cutting boards.

I agree with Deb. I have several Le Creuset silicone trivets that are my favorites because they are a very thick, excellent quality, silicone.

You don't want to put anything that is ANY type of glass, ceramic, stoneware, etc, on a hard or cold surface. I have other trivets, but I keep my silicone ones handy and want to go to them every time.

I'm sure there are others, and maybe even less expensive (the LC ones are not 'expensive', per se, but possibly cost more than others. But a good quality silicone will last forever and a day. LC makes a nice rectangular one that I have used under anything from a baking dish to a 18x13" baking pan. I also have several of the larger round ones and a few of the tiny round ones (just because the tiny ones were so cute, ok. hehe).

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,178
Registered: ‎09-02-2010

I have some round ones that I got here a long time ago, they're springy, I got a large and a small, if you pot is even larger you can turn it inside out and put the small one inside. I also have several of the solid square ones.

~~
*Off The Deep End~A very short trip for some!*
Valued Contributor
Posts: 1,097
Registered: ‎04-22-2010
On 3/11/2015 ROMARY 1 said:

Never, never place a 'hot' Pyrex (or other brand) dish on a 'cold' counter! Thousands of exploded chards of glass years ago. ALWAYS PLACE HOT ITEMS ON AN OVEN MIT, THICK TOWEL, THICK PLACE MAT, (and whatever else is thick). Never on a cold counter or cold surface, including cold trivets.

Great advice!!

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,539
Registered: ‎11-23-2013

I thought cold (room temperature) trivets were safe. I like the idea of using the silicone potholders.

Get your flu shot...because I didn't.
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,178
Registered: ‎09-02-2010
On 3/11/2015 HonnyBrown said:

I thought cold (room temperature) trivets were safe. I like the idea of using the silicone potholders.

I think it would depend on what it's made of. Stoneware or wood probably ok, glass or ceramic, cast iron maybe not. Some things seem to keep the cold. I know I use my marble pastry board for that reason, it keeps my dough cool. I would never set something hot on it. My lazy susan either.

~~
*Off The Deep End~A very short trip for some!*
Highlighted
Super Contributor
Posts: 429
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

There really seems to be quite a misunderstanding among newer users of Pyrex who are lead to believe it is premium performing cookware.

Remember how Pyrex was advertised years ago.. was it not something like ""Oven to Icebox"" or even ""Icebox to Oven""?

Now the Pyrex pieces come with a warning.. This is an incredible usurpation of a name that years ago meant quality.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 31,832
Registered: ‎01-08-2011

Hairline cracks and chips that compromise the glaze can harbor salmonella, and all manner of bacteria which leaches into the food. You won't find anyone who hasn't had Serve Safe certification using anything like that.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,732
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Here's some info I have posted in the past about Pyrex and Anchor Hocking that points out the change to a cheaper and potentially dangerous forumla:

For anyone who wants an UNBIASED account of the development and changes in Pyrex and Anchor Hocking, it would behoove them to read the Consumer Reports article entitled "Glass Bakeware That Shatters" in its January 2011 issue and not depend solely on the manufacturer's own website.

The Consumer Reports in-depth five-page analysis was a year in the making and includes the history of the glassware, the results of their lab tests on the current Pyrex and Anchor Hocking products made in the U.S. and those made in Europe, a series of interviews with people severely injured from shattered glass bakeware, suggestions for consumers' safety when using the bakeware, and a plea for government action, primarily because the two companies have been reluctant to address the problems but instead have taken a "blame the victim" stance.

Yes, World Kitchen does claim that Pyrex has consistently been made of soda lime glass for 60 years. However, Sarah Horvath, a Corning spokewoman, states that Corning made Pyrex out of both soda lime and borosilicate before selling to World Kitchen in 1998. And a former executive scientist with Corning, P. Bruce Adams, says that borosilicate was still being used by Pyrex when he retired in 1987. So it is not at all clear when the switch took place.

The important point is that strengthened or not, the cheaper soda lime version tested much more poorly than did the more expensive borosilicate glass, which by the way, is still made in Europe by the company that bought the rights from Pyrex in 1994.

This information is not really new, but it is delineated clearly and thoroughly in this Consumer Reports article. It is worth reading before deciding to buy Pyrex or Anchor Hocking glass bakeware. And the sidebar on reducing the risks if one does decide to buy and use the product is invaluable.

A google search of "Pyrex dangers" will verify this information.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland