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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,613
Registered: ‎05-06-2010

Should I get windows 11? I have windows 10, happy with it,what changes are there with w-11?tucka.

Contributor
Posts: 39
Registered: ‎08-10-2021

I'd like to know the same thing as to what changes they have made. I wan't thrilled when we were forced in to getting Windows 10 (I'm on a pc), so I guess we'll see IF they force it again on us.

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 89
Registered: ‎03-31-2020

I'm in no rush to update to it.  I'm on Windows 10 and everything I need is working fine.  There is a statement on the upgrade message that says some apps and features may not work properly after updating.

 

First thing I noticed when they first starting marketing it is how they've made the home screen and task bar look just like my macbook.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,190
Registered: ‎10-03-2014

I don't know much about it yet, but I'm waiting until all the bugs are ironed out.  Why ask for problems when Windows 10 is working fine?  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,465
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

Re: windows 11.

[ Edited ]

If you google Windows 11 FAQ there is an entire page on Microsoft's site showing all kinds of info there.

 

Also, there is a link showing up on my Windows Update screen in settings..."Learn About Windows 11" . That will take you to the FAQ page, too, plus there's more.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,119
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I'm building a new PC now and will upgrade it to Windows 11 and hope for the best. Most of the major bugs were worked out in the beta testing. There seem to be mostly minor issues remaining. My old PC wasn't upgradable, so it was time to build a new one. 

 

The majority of older computers can't upgrade to Windows 11 (at least not easily) so if you want to upgrade you may have to get a new computer.

 

For anyone interested the new computer is AMD Ryzen 5600G processor, Asus ROG Strix B550 F WIFI motherboard, 32 GBs of 3200 mhz RAM, two 1 terabyte m.2 drives, a 510-watt power supply, and a Corsair 4000D case.  The total cost was around $970.  I should get another five to seven years from that build. It's an absurdly easy build. It might have taken me a half-hour all total to assemble everything. I'm just waiting for Amazon to deliver my Windows 10 USB stick today and I'll finish everything. I've already activated the fTPM switch in the BIOS settings and everything else already meets Windows 11 standards so after getting Windows 10 installed it should let me upgrade immediately to Windows 11. 

 

I'm breaking some of my own rules on computer building with this build. I'm using newer components. (The CPU just hit the market in August.) I typically buy components that are in year two or three of release, but I'm going with newer, but still very well-reviewed stuff, in this build. It's a little pricier than my earlier builds, but I'm not really reusing much from the old PC. (I will move the hard drives over once the new build is up and running though.) I may also scavenge the two case fans from the old PC to get extra cooling in the new one. With any luck, sometime today or tomorrow the new computer will be up and fully functional. I know it POSTs now, and I've been in the BIOS adjusting settings, so everything so far is working well. I just need to get Windows installed and I should be in business. And I'm just waiting now for Amazon to deliver it.

 

This is the first computer I've built without an optical drive of some sort. My first build had a CD ROM drive, then the next two had DVD drives. While debating options for this build, I tried to remember the last time I'd used the DVD drive and I couldn't, so no DVD drive this time around. We'll have to see if I miss it. 

 

I've got two older spinning hard drives in my current computer (a 320 GB and a 1 TB one) along with a 128 GB SSD. They'll get added to the 2 TBs of m.2 storage in the new computer. So, in total it should have around 3.48 TBs of total storage. My first "real" computer had a 1.2 GB hard drive and the salesman at the time told me I'd never fill that in a lifetime of computing. Ha! Things have changed quite a bit in later years.

Fly!!! Eagles!!! Fly!!!
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,258
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@gardenman

This looks like a very sweet computer.

What Video card are you putting in? Is this a gaming PC? 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,119
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Nuttmeg wrote:

@gardenman

This looks like a very sweet computer.

What Video card are you putting in? Is this a gaming PC? 


The videocard market now is insane. The 5600G has integrated graphics on a par with a GTX1030-1050 on most games and with the pricing and supply of videocards now the integrated graphics make the most sense. If the supply increases and the price of videocards comes down, I can add one later. (Likely a 3060. The 3080 and 3090 would get CPU bound, but the 3060 is a good fit for the 5600G.)

 

The integrated graphics makes trouble shooting any display issues easier also. If you have a videocard and no integrated graphics, the only way to tell if the problem is with the GPU or motherboard is by swapping one or the other. With integrated graphics you can simply move your display out from the GPU to the motherboard video out and if the display is back, the GPU was the problem.

 

I debated between the 5600G and the 5700G, but I ultimately concluded the $80 difference wasn't worthwhile for me. This should run nearly all games at 1080p at around 60 frames per second without a GPU. I can add a GPU later if desired. I might have to upgrade the power supply if I do, but the 5600G is a pretty competent little beast that only needs 65 watts. The 5700G typically only gains five percent or so in performance. Eighty dollars for five percent improvement just didn't make sense to me.

 

It'll be my do-it-all computer. Writing, photo editing, video editing, and gaming. The 32GBs of RAM is wise as the CPU will use as much as 16 GBs for the video if it's available. That still leaves me another 16 GBs for the games. I wasn't planning on two terabytes of m.2 storage, but Amazon told me my first order was "undeliverable" then it got delivered. So with the second m.2 stick on hand, I plopped it in. It added another $95 to the cost, but I won't have to worry about storage for a long while.

 

About the only way you can get a good videocard at a fair price is by buying a prebuilt, but prebuilts always have compromises. They'll use lesser quality motherboards, slower memory, smaller power supplies, etc. to squeeze every penny from the consumer. Everything I use is top quality and four or five star rated. The memory is only 3200 MHz but that's the sweet spot for this CPU. Those who have tested it with faster memory have seen minimal improvement. It's pretty easy to go from a $900+ computer to a $3,000+ computer if you overbuy components. The motherboard supports up to 4400 MHz memory but if the CPU can't use it, why spend the extra? 

 

I'll be firing it up with Windows 10/11 tomorrow and that should be fun. Everything's gone smoothly so far. It POSTs, lets me into the BIOS, so it should perform well for the foreseeable future.

Fly!!! Eagles!!! Fly!!!
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,366
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

I was told I would have to buy a new computer because you cannot upgrade Windows 10 to Windows 11.  Wonder why they made it that way. 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,258
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@bonnielu wrote:

I was told I would have to buy a new computer because you cannot upgrade Windows 10 to Windows 11.  Wonder why they made it that way. 

@bonnielu 


Technology just changes. A new computer will come with Windows 11.