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Super Contributor
Posts: 771
Registered: ‎04-06-2010

Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

Sounds weird but do you ever subconsciously create a challenging mess on your PC, just to see if you can fix it? I just did that!

It all starts with my HP mini, these were popular a few years back, like a tablet sized laptop... I never quite liked mine, took it on trips for email and thats was it, never surfed much on it. I spent enough on it but it always seemed slow, out of sorts. Well I complained to HP and they replaced it and I gave the replacement away to hubby. It worked funky too but still better than mine.

Looking at it now I am thinking what to do with this old thing, ebay, garagare sale, or try to FIX IT...thats a lofty goal!!!

I always get a SSL errors on it, no matter what I try to open, and it thinks it is in 2002, I removed the INternet Explorer after downloading Google Chrome, that was mistake number one. It still can access the web, but basically cant display anything correctly. So first question is how do I get rid of the SSL roadblock on everything and howdo I reinstall IE, when it wont let me on to Google because the SSl error? For some reason I still think I can get some use out of this, it was almost $400.00...granted they replaced it, but still! I would like to just see if I can fix it. Any ideas?

thanks!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,913
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

No I don't create them. I have had enough experience with fixing problems that I didn't create to satisfy my yearning to possibly learn more about computers. I will leave that up to the classrooms and their instructors.

Me? Many ask me "what caused the problem"? Most of the time I say "beats me", I am more interested in fixing the problem than diagnosing what of many things could have caused it. Now when I raced cars? Had to know the cause of engine failures. With computers if I looked for all the causes most of the time I would never get to the solutions.

Guess I know just enough about computers to have enough guesses of what might work to fix them, thus the cause is way back on my proprietary list of fixing.

But then again, I don't consider myself to be a computer Guru.

hckynut(john)
Super Contributor
Posts: 771
Registered: ‎04-06-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

Hocky, thanks! Awwww, fooey, you didnt take the bait. HELP...how do i get IE back on the HP? Can I download it on to an plug in and reload the HP with it??

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,442
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

On 7/21/2014 Spunkyspouts said:

Hocky, thanks! Awwww, fooey, you didnt take the bait. HELP...how do i get IE back on the HP? Can I download it on to an plug in and reload the HP with it??

You can't delete or uninstall IE. It's part of the operating system. The easiest way to solve your problem is to do a system restore to a time before you scr*ew up the computer.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,138
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

The SSL problem you're having is more likely related to a bad CMOS battery (that HP calls a RTC Real Time Clock) battery for some reason) than anything you've done. SSL stands for Secure Sockets Layer and SSL certificates are time stamped. Since your HP Mini thinks it's in 2002 and that's now twelve years ago, any certificate it sees it's red-flagging as being incorrect due to the conflicting dates. The version of SSL on the HP Mini is also likely way out of date and may be insecure which could also be generating the issue. CMOS batteries have a finite lifespan and twelve years is way outside that window. Once one dies, all of the settings (date, time, etc.) are lost each time the power is turned off.

How to fix the problems. If the clock is the issue then you have to replace the RTC battery (what the rest of the world calls the CMOS battery.) Doing this is a tick complicated in an HP Mini as you have to remove the keyboard to get to it, but there is an online service manual that walks you through the process. I'll post a link to it below. (You'll likely have to copy and paste the link as my links aren't linking these days.) Once that battery is replaced (assuming you can find a replacement) then you should be able to reset the clock to the correct time and date and that may solve your issues. If not, then updating the browser to a newer version should solve the SSL issue. Good luck, but I'd really have to love that HP Mini to go through all of that.

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01895806.pdf

Fly!!! Eagles!!! Fly!!!
Super Contributor
Posts: 3,036
Registered: ‎03-21-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

On 7/21/2014 gardenman said:

The SSL problem you're having is more likely related to a bad CMOS battery (that HP calls a RTC Real Time Clock) battery for some reason) than anything you've done. SSL stands for Secure Sockets Layer and SSL certificates are time stamped. Since your HP Mini thinks it's in 2002 and that's now twelve years ago, any certificate it sees it's red-flagging as being incorrect due to the conflicting dates. The version of SSL on the HP Mini is also likely way out of date and may be insecure which could also be generating the issue. CMOS batteries have a finite lifespan and twelve years is way outside that window. Once one dies, all of the settings (date, time, etc.) are lost each time the power is turned off.

How to fix the problems. If the clock is the issue then you have to replace the RTC battery (what the rest of the world calls the CMOS battery.) Doing this is a tick complicated in an HP Mini as you have to remove the keyboard to get to it, but there is an online service manual that walks you through the process. I'll post a link to it below. (You'll likely have to copy and paste the link as my links aren't linking these days.) Once that battery is replaced (assuming you can find a replacement) then you should be able to reset the clock to the correct time and date and that may solve your issues. If not, then updating the browser to a newer version should solve the SSL issue. Good luck, but I'd really have to love that HP Mini to go through all of that.

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01895806.pdf

Just curious, why wouldn't restoring it to factory state work here? Wouldn't that reset everything? For sure she would get her internet explorer back, which may solve for the SSL.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,138
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

On 7/21/2014 Lynnj said:
On 7/21/2014 gardenman said:

The SSL problem you're having is more likely related to a bad CMOS battery (that HP calls a RTC Real Time Clock) battery for some reason) than anything you've done. SSL stands for Secure Sockets Layer and SSL certificates are time stamped. Since your HP Mini thinks it's in 2002 and that's now twelve years ago, any certificate it sees it's red-flagging as being incorrect due to the conflicting dates. The version of SSL on the HP Mini is also likely way out of date and may be insecure which could also be generating the issue. CMOS batteries have a finite lifespan and twelve years is way outside that window. Once one dies, all of the settings (date, time, etc.) are lost each time the power is turned off.

How to fix the problems. If the clock is the issue then you have to replace the RTC battery (what the rest of the world calls the CMOS battery.) Doing this is a tick complicated in an HP Mini as you have to remove the keyboard to get to it, but there is an online service manual that walks you through the process. I'll post a link to it below. (You'll likely have to copy and paste the link as my links aren't linking these days.) Once that battery is replaced (assuming you can find a replacement) then you should be able to reset the clock to the correct time and date and that may solve your issues. If not, then updating the browser to a newer version should solve the SSL issue. Good luck, but I'd really have to love that HP Mini to go through all of that.

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01895806.pdf

Just curious, why wouldn't restoring it to factory state work here? Wouldn't that reset everything? For sure she would get her internet explorer back, which may solve for the SSL.

Resetting it to a factory state would solve any software issues but it won't recharge the CMOS battery. If the battery and the dating issues are the cause of the SSL errors she's getting then resetting it won't change anything. If the SSL errors are due to her version of SSL being obsolete then it also won't solve anything. It won't make things any worse and it might help, so if she can do it then by all means do it, but my gut says this is more of a date issue and with a dead CMOS battery you've got to constantly reset that until you change the battery.

Fly!!! Eagles!!! Fly!!!
Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,153
Registered: ‎05-22-2012

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

I would do a restore and then contact HP's customer service about the SSL issue. You say you contacted them about it being slow, but you did not mention contacting them about the SSL issue.

Frankly, if you didn't know how to get IE back, I don't think you're ready to deal with replacing a CMOS battery on your own. But hey, if you're willing, go for it. I built my own desktop computer with a book and a small tool set and my only previous experience was swapping out video cards. I also had a friend to phone when I got in trouble. By buying individual parts and assembling it myself, I saved $500 and was able to afford a better machine than I could have if someone else built it or I ordered an off-the-shelf model. But desktops are, for me, easier than laptops.

Super Contributor
Posts: 3,036
Registered: ‎03-21-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

On 7/21/2014 gardenman said:
On 7/21/2014 Lynnj said:
On 7/21/2014 gardenman said:

The SSL problem you're having is more likely related to a bad CMOS battery (that HP calls a RTC Real Time Clock) battery for some reason) than anything you've done. SSL stands for Secure Sockets Layer and SSL certificates are time stamped. Since your HP Mini thinks it's in 2002 and that's now twelve years ago, any certificate it sees it's red-flagging as being incorrect due to the conflicting dates. The version of SSL on the HP Mini is also likely way out of date and may be insecure which could also be generating the issue. CMOS batteries have a finite lifespan and twelve years is way outside that window. Once one dies, all of the settings (date, time, etc.) are lost each time the power is turned off.

How to fix the problems. If the clock is the issue then you have to replace the RTC battery (what the rest of the world calls the CMOS battery.) Doing this is a tick complicated in an HP Mini as you have to remove the keyboard to get to it, but there is an online service manual that walks you through the process. I'll post a link to it below. (You'll likely have to copy and paste the link as my links aren't linking these days.) Once that battery is replaced (assuming you can find a replacement) then you should be able to reset the clock to the correct time and date and that may solve your issues. If not, then updating the browser to a newer version should solve the SSL issue. Good luck, but I'd really have to love that HP Mini to go through all of that.

http://h10032.www1.hp.com/ctg/Manual/c01895806.pdf

Just curious, why wouldn't restoring it to factory state work here? Wouldn't that reset everything? For sure she would get her internet explorer back, which may solve for the SSL.

Resetting it to a factory state would solve any software issues but it won't recharge the CMOS battery. If the battery and the dating issues are the cause of the SSL errors she's getting then resetting it won't change anything. If the SSL errors are due to her version of SSL being obsolete then it also won't solve anything. It won't make things any worse and it might help, so if she can do it then by all means do it, but my gut says this is more of a date issue and with a dead CMOS battery you've got to constantly reset that until you change the battery.

Interesting. I am going to have to read about this battery. Never heard of it before. I actually think she should try the restore to factory first, then if same result, try replacing the battery that you suggested. Just think it would be easier that way.
Super Contributor
Posts: 3,036
Registered: ‎03-21-2010

Re: Computer gurus that like a challenge..can u relate?

On 7/21/2014 ChynnaBlue said:

I would do a restore and then contact HP's customer service about the SSL issue. You say you contacted them about it being slow, but you did not mention contacting them about the SSL issue.

Frankly, if you didn't know how to get IE back, I don't think you're ready to deal with replacing a CMOS battery on your own. But hey, if you're willing, go for it. I built my own desktop computer with a book and a small tool set and my only previous experience was swapping out video cards. I also had a friend to phone when I got in trouble. By buying individual parts and assembling it myself, I saved $500 and was able to afford a better machine than I could have if someone else built it or I ordered an off-the-shelf model. But desktops are, for me, easier than laptops.

I agree with all above. Congrats on building your own PC. It's not that hard if you know what your doing. Just buy the right parts, then assemble it.