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@Sunshine45 wrote:

@JeanLouiseFinch

 

the phrase "vegetarian options" says it all. the guest is not demanding fish.

it is not difficult to provide vegetarian options on a thanksgiving table.

it is also not difficult to let the host know the responses received along with the total number of guests.

 


@Sunshine45  Are you reading the same OP as me?

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Just curious, if (after rsvps are in) the hostess for some reason doesn't inquire about dietary restrictions, will you advise her of them?

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You are in an unfortunate go between situation. If you were the host, or I, then my response to those rude people would be that I was sorry their requirements could not be accommendated and, because of that,  will not be attending.

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@JeanLouiseFinch wrote:

@Sunshine45 wrote:

@JeanLouiseFinch

 

the phrase "vegetarian options" says it all. the guest is not demanding fish.

it is not difficult to provide vegetarian options on a thanksgiving table.

it is also not difficult to let the host know the responses received along with the total number of guests.

 


@Sunshine45  Are you reading the same OP as me?


 

 

 

evidently we see this differently @JeanLouiseFinch.

if a person has dietary restrictions and they want them known, then the host really should be informed. if they choose not to accomodate an EASY REQUEST for simple vegetables, then fine....let the guest know. i dont think it is right not to let the host know of this situation and let it be decided from there. if there wont be any options then this can be relayed to the guest easily via email. they can then make other plans if they choose. these are MY opinions obviously.

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@MJ12 wrote:

Just curious, if (after rsvps are in) the hostess for some reason doesn't inquire about dietary restrictions, will you advise her of them?


@MJ12  Good questions.  I will send an email to my boss that says:

 

"Just so you know, I've had a few guests remind me that they are vegetarian and gluten-free.  I don't expect (board member) to make special dishes for them, especially when I imagine there will be ample options if the dinner incudes what a traditional Thanksgiving entails.  However, I also don't want (board member) to be caught off card or feel like she didn't get all necessary information about her guests, as that might be awkward if a conversation arises about these dietary issues."

 

Then my boss can deal with it if he wants to, and I've covered my own rear end.  

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Re: Thanksgiving Rant

[ Edited ]

@TenderMercies wrote:

@MJ12 wrote:

Just curious, if (after rsvps are in) the hostess for some reason doesn't inquire about dietary restrictions, will you advise her of them?


@MJ12  Good questions.  I will send an email to my boss that says:

 

"Just so you know, I've had a few guests remind me that they are vegetarian and gluten-free.  I don't expect (board member) to make special dishes for them, especially when I imagine there will be ample options if the dinner incudes what a traditional Thanksgiving entails.  However, I also don't want (board member) to be caught off card or feel like she didn't get all necessary information about her guests, as that might be awkward if a conversation arises about these dietary issues."

 

Then my boss can deal with it if he wants to, and I've covered my own rear end.  


A simple "How would you like me to handle it" after the first sentance would be the professional way to address it with your boss..

 

Also is anyone actually talking to eachother or is this all email communication.  A mass email really is not the same as a personal invitation, that may have something to do with the tone of the responses.

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@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@TenderMercies wrote:

@MJ12 wrote:

Just curious, if (after rsvps are in) the hostess for some reason doesn't inquire about dietary restrictions, will you advise her of them?


@MJ12  Good questions.  I will send an email to my boss that says:

 

"Just so you know, I've had a few guests remind me that they are vegetarian and gluten-free.  I don't expect (board member) to make special dishes for them, especially when I imagine there will be ample options if the dinner incudes what a traditional Thanksgiving entails.  However, I also don't want (board member) to be caught off card or feel like she didn't get all necessary information about her guests, as that might be awkward if a conversation arises about these dietary issues."

 

Then my boss can deal with it if he wants to, and I've covered my own rear end.  


A simple "How would you like me to handle it" after the first sentance would be the professional way to address it with your boss..


Great, now you're telling me how to write an email to my boss.  I'm glad you know my boss and understand my relationship with him so well.  

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@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@TenderMercies wrote:

@MJ12 wrote:

Just curious, if (after rsvps are in) the hostess for some reason doesn't inquire about dietary restrictions, will you advise her of them?


@MJ12  Good questions.  I will send an email to my boss that says:

 

"Just so you know, I've had a few guests remind me that they are vegetarian and gluten-free.  I don't expect (board member) to make special dishes for them, especially when I imagine there will be ample options if the dinner incudes what a traditional Thanksgiving entails.  However, I also don't want (board member) to be caught off card or feel like she didn't get all necessary information about her guests, as that might be awkward if a conversation arises about these dietary issues."

 

Then my boss can deal with it if he wants to, and I've covered my own rear end.  


A simple "How would you like me to handle it" after the first sentance would be the professional way to address it with your boss..

 

Also is anyone actually talking to eachother or is this all email communication.  A mass email really is not the same as a personal invitation, that may have something to do with the tone of the responses.


I don't think she shoud put herself in the middle of this situation any more than she already is.  She passing on the information; she shouldn't have to handle anything to do with a dinner invitation to a party she is not hosting.

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@TenderMercies wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@TenderMercies wrote:

@MJ12 wrote:

Just curious, if (after rsvps are in) the hostess for some reason doesn't inquire about dietary restrictions, will you advise her of them?


@MJ12  Good questions.  I will send an email to my boss that says:

 

"Just so you know, I've had a few guests remind me that they are vegetarian and gluten-free.  I don't expect (board member) to make special dishes for them, especially when I imagine there will be ample options if the dinner incudes what a traditional Thanksgiving entails.  However, I also don't want (board member) to be caught off card or feel like she didn't get all necessary information about her guests, as that might be awkward if a conversation arises about these dietary issues."

 

Then my boss can deal with it if he wants to, and I've covered my own rear end.  


A simple "How would you like me to handle it" after the first sentance would be the professional way to address it with your boss..


Great, now you're telling me how to write an email to my boss.  I'm glad you know my boss and understand my relationship with him so well.  


Why are you being so defensive? This is a forum people are replying and giving suggestions. 

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@faeriemoon wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@TenderMercies wrote:

@MJ12 wrote:

Just curious, if (after rsvps are in) the hostess for some reason doesn't inquire about dietary restrictions, will you advise her of them?


@MJ12  Good questions.  I will send an email to my boss that says:

 

"Just so you know, I've had a few guests remind me that they are vegetarian and gluten-free.  I don't expect (board member) to make special dishes for them, especially when I imagine there will be ample options if the dinner incudes what a traditional Thanksgiving entails.  However, I also don't want (board member) to be caught off card or feel like she didn't get all necessary information about her guests, as that might be awkward if a conversation arises about these dietary issues."

 

Then my boss can deal with it if he wants to, and I've covered my own rear end.  


A simple "How would you like me to handle it" after the first sentance would be the professional way to address it with your boss..

 

Also is anyone actually talking to eachother or is this all email communication.  A mass email really is not the same as a personal invitation, that may have something to do with the tone of the responses.


I don't think she shoud put herself in the middle of this situation any more than she already is.  She passing on the information; she shouldn't have to handle anything to do with a dinner invitation to a party she is not hosting.


Was apparently asked to do something by her boss.  If she felt it was not part of her "job" then she should have said something then.  To do a job halfway then dump it on someone else is not how things should be done.  At least not if one is being professional

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