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Registered: ‎04-20-2020

The Spanish Flu was made up of genes that caused bacterial pneumonia.  

 

The first antibiotics were prescribed in the late 1930s. Bacterial infection, as a cause of death, plummeted. Between 1944 and 1972 human life expectancy jumped by eight years - an increase largely credited to the introduction of antibiotics.

 

Many experts were confident the tide had turned in the war against bacterial infections. Indeed, in 1969, the then US Surgeon General, William Stewart, boldly told the US Congress it was time to "…close the books on infectious diseases."

 

By the 1950s, when antibiotics were still new, there was ample evidence of the emergence of resistance.

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@hckynut wrote:

Really! Where the Spanish flu started? I am far from a historian and my primary interest right now, actually pretty much my whole life, is the present, along with maybe tomorrow.

 

My mother was 19-20 during that time and I heard the horror stories from her. Was her memory perfect? Were her details to me factual? Do you really think I give a **** right now?

 

 

 

hckynut 🏒


@hckynut, those that forget (or disdain) history are doomed to repeat it.

 

Besides, my friend, you did read the subject line.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
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My grandpa's 1st wife died while pregnant with their3rd child in the epidemic.  Then he married my grandma and had my father. My grandma had actually been to his 1st wedding.  My grandma was 40 which was unusually old for a 1st time mom. She also raised the 2 older boys. 

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Re: Spanish Flu Pandemic

[ Edited ]

 

Hi there @suzyQ3 ,

 

Yep, read the title. Was interested in where it was going. Then I see all the back and forth over who is right and who is wrong about the origin of this tragedy.  Hence, my post.

 

I certainly go along with the "repeat" statements regarding history, with so many different "opinions" of it's origin? That part of the history of this pandemic doesn't seem that relevant to me.

 

History was my downfall in high school(I am a dropout) as I took World History "1" four times, the last being in Summer School, to get a passing grade. Just didn't see the relevance of needing the info to my way of making money.

 

Now Book Keeping/General Business and Type classes? I aced all of them, mostly because I was already using them in the jobs I had during that time. 

 

I was just starting American History, in which I was/am greatly interested, butt! I decided to drop out, and I joined the US Army. Did get my GED while serving my active duty.

 

 

C'est la vie? 🇺🇸

 

 

 

hckynut 🏒

hckynut(john)
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@Judaline- I talked to my dad about this yesterday.  He was born in 1920 so he doesn't personally remember the Spanish Flu, but his parents were young marrieds during WWI and the flu pandemic.  He said they talked about living thru the flu, wearing masks, doctors dying because they treated those infected, etc.  It sounded like what we're living thru today.  Except, back then, there were no antibiotics, no ventilators.  If someone got sick, there were no treatments so people didn't go to a hospital.  Doctors were making house calls 24 hours a day and people died at home.   To answer your question - Dad said the Spanish Flu just faded away.  All of a sudden, no one was getting infected anymore.  It was just suddenly gone.   

* A woman is like a tea bag. You can't tell how strong she is until you put her in hot water. *
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@suzyQ3 wrote:

@January121 wrote:

@Lipstickdiva wrote:

As an aside, I didn't realize until recently that the Spanish Flu didn't start in Spain either.   It began in China.  


@Lipstickdiva  .... WOW!!!!! .... the Chinese have been stabbing us in the back for a long, long time .... hopefully Karma comes to our aid so we can get even😉


@January121, it would be a very good idea for you read read the replies. It is NOT known where the Spanish flu originated. There are several countries, including our own, that are on list.


@suzyQ3  .... please don’t tell me to read the replies !!!!! .. I made a statement & I truly believe that China has been stabbing us in the back for a very long time regardless of where the Spanish flu originated .... I am concerned with Covid-19 & how it has effected the world today .... my life & the lives of so many have been turned upside down & will probably never be the same as we knew it .... I truly believe China is responsible for all of this & like I said hopefully Karma helps the world get even.

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It is no longer acceptable to refer to that pandemic as the Spanish Flu.  The correct reference today is the Pandemic of 1918.

 

The only reason Spain was tagged was due to the fact that Spain was neutral at the time; the flu had spread to the countries our military would be involved with.

 

The press throughout severely under reported the cases in Europe so that the morale of our military would not be brought down worrying about infection in the countries involved in the war.

 

The label was deceptive and not appreciated by Spain.

 

While Kansas is generally accepted as ground zero, there has been nothing that 100% points to the boy from the farm infecting our troops who then carried the flu overseas. 

 

My MIL's siblings all died from that flu; her parents survived and had 3 more children after; my MIL being one of them.

 

 

""But tell me where do the children play"-Cat Stevens
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@Cakers3 wrote:

It is no longer acceptable to refer to that pandemic as the Spanish Flu.  The correct reference today is the Pandemic of 1918.

 

The only reason Spain was tagged was due to the fact that Spain was neutral at the time; the flu had spread to the countries our military would be involved with.

 

The press throughout severely under reported the cases in Europe so that the morale of our military would not be brought down worrying about infection in the countries involved in the war.

 

The label was deceptive and not appreciated by Spain.

 

While Kansas is generally accepted as ground zero, there has been nothing that 100% points to the boy from the farm infecting our troops who then carried the flu overseas. 

 

My MIL's siblings all died from that flu; her parents survived and had 3 more children after; my MIL being one of them.

 

 


That make so much sense, @Cakers3. Diseases are not citizens of any one country. I will from hereon call it the 1918 Pandemic (sounds the best to me:-))


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
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Registered: ‎06-17-2015

@suzyQ3 wrote:

@Cakers3 wrote:

It is no longer acceptable to refer to that pandemic as the Spanish Flu.  The correct reference today is the Pandemic of 1918.

 

The only reason Spain was tagged was due to the fact that Spain was neutral at the time; the flu had spread to the countries our military would be involved with.

 

The press throughout severely under reported the cases in Europe so that the morale of our military would not be brought down worrying about infection in the countries involved in the war.

 

The label was deceptive and not appreciated by Spain.

 

While Kansas is generally accepted as ground zero, there has been nothing that 100% points to the boy from the farm infecting our troops who then carried the flu overseas. 

 

My MIL's siblings all died from that flu; her parents survived and had 3 more children after; my MIL being one of them.

 

 


That make so much sense, @Cakers3. Diseases are not citizens of any one country. I will from hereon call it the 1918 Pandemic (sounds the best to me:-))


@suzyQ3   Nations involved in the fighting were under a media blackout.  Spain was not.  In fact, Spain actually referred to the flu as the "French Flu", believing it had spread to Spain from France.

 

Even the CDC does not refer to the 1918 Pandemic as the Spanish Flu anymore, although it is mentioned in reference to the time period.

 

Technically they refer to it at the 1918 Pandemic H1N1, avian in nature.

 

 

""But tell me where do the children play"-Cat Stevens
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@Cakers3 wrote:

@suzyQ3 wrote:

@Cakers3 wrote:

It is no longer acceptable to refer to that pandemic as the Spanish Flu.  The correct reference today is the Pandemic of 1918.

 

The only reason Spain was tagged was due to the fact that Spain was neutral at the time; the flu had spread to the countries our military would be involved with.

 

The press throughout severely under reported the cases in Europe so that the morale of our military would not be brought down worrying about infection in the countries involved in the war.

 

The label was deceptive and not appreciated by Spain.

 

While Kansas is generally accepted as ground zero, there has been nothing that 100% points to the boy from the farm infecting our troops who then carried the flu overseas. 

 

My MIL's siblings all died from that flu; her parents survived and had 3 more children after; my MIL being one of them.

 

 


That make so much sense, @Cakers3. Diseases are not citizens of any one country. I will from hereon call it the 1918 Pandemic (sounds the best to me:-))


@suzyQ3   Nations involved in the fighting were under a media blackout.  Spain was not.  In fact, Spain actually referred to the flu as the "French Flu", believing it had spread to Spain from France.

 

Even the CDC does not refer to the 1918 Pandemic as the Spanish Flu anymore, although it is mentioned in reference to the time period.

 

Technically they refer to it at the 1918 Pandemic H1N1, avian in nature.

 

 


@Cakers3, yes, I was aware of everything but the fact that the old name is not used anymore. Thanks again. :-)


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland