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Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎06-13-2010

I cried as I read this thread, and was not sure if I would be able to respond😢. I will never understand why those that are financially able to do so, find it thrilling to slaughter defenseless animals. Elephants are mighty, but no match for the rifles of the hunters. Lions, tigers, sharks, elephants, whales and other "exotic" animals die for thrill and profit. There needs to be a global initiative to cease the proliferation of this barbaric practice. My heart is truly heavy.💔

 

 

~~~All we need is LOVE💖

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Registered: ‎09-15-2016

People in this country go nuts over just spotting coyotes in their neighborhood. I understand the concern when these large animals threaten people & hope they use the funds to fight the horrible problem of poaching. I don't like it either but I don't live there & it's their resource.

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@kitcat51 wrote:

People in this country go nuts over just spotting coyotes in their neighborhood. I understand the concern when these large animals threaten people & hope they use the funds to fight the horrible problem of poaching. I don't like it either but I don't live there & it's their resource.


@kitcat51There is no indication in the article that people are threatened by the elephants. Of course they are wild animals, which I don't think necessitates slaughter.

 

As for hoping the funds go to the problem of poaching? It seems the height or irony to kill them to protect them from being killed.

 

We spoke (through a translator) with one of the head people in charge of catching poachers in the part of Tanzania in which we were traveling. They are diligent in their response to the tragedy. He said that his men shoot to kill, and he wasn't talking about the elephants.


~Who in the world am I? Ah, that's the great puzzle~ Lewis Carroll, Alice in Wonderland
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@suzyQ3 wrote:

@kitcat51 wrote:

People in this country go nuts over just spotting coyotes in their neighborhood. I understand the concern when these large animals threaten people & hope they use the funds to fight the horrible problem of poaching. I don't like it either but I don't live there & it's their resource.


@kitcat51There is no indication in the article that people are threatened by the elephants. Of course they are wild animals, which I don't think necessitates slaughter.

 

As for hoping the funds go to the problem of poaching? It seems the height or irony to kill them to protect them from being killed.

 

We spoke (through a translator) with one of the head people in charge of catching poachers in the part of Tanzania in which we were traveling. They are diligent in their response to the tragedy. He said that his men shoot to kill, and he wasn't talking about the elephants.


The article I read said they were a problem for farmers, people live on farms. Would you prefer the herd was culled by the government or by hunting fees that could fund the fight against poachers.  Poaching is an awful problem that takes the lives of so many animals &  poachers should be killed on the spot. It would be a great idea for preserves to join together & share money to fight the problem & if limited hunting is going to happen charge huge fees to fund it...$39,000 isn't enough. These animals are their resource to do as the please, tourism & hunting could work together...I don't  like it but it's reality.

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Re: No words...

[ Edited ]

@kitcat51 wrote:

@suzyQ3 wrote:

@kitcat51 wrote:

People in this country go nuts over just spotting coyotes in their neighborhood. I understand the concern when these large animals threaten people & hope they use the funds to fight the horrible problem of poaching. I don't like it either but I don't live there & it's their resource.


@kitcat51There is no indication in the article that people are threatened by the elephants. Of course they are wild animals, which I don't think necessitates slaughter.

 

As for hoping the funds go to the problem of poaching? It seems the height or irony to kill them to protect them from being killed.

 

We spoke (through a translator) with one of the head people in charge of catching poachers in the part of Tanzania in which we were traveling. They are diligent in their response to the tragedy. He said that his men shoot to kill, and he wasn't talking about the elephants.


The article I read said they were a problem for farmers, people live on farms. Would you prefer the herd was culled by the government or by hunting fees that could fund the fight against poachers.  Poaching is an awful problem that takes the lives of so many animals &  poachers should be killed on the spot. It would be a great idea for preserves to join together & share money to fight the problem & if limited hunting is going to happen charge huge fees to fund it...$39,000 isn't enough. These animals are their resource to do as the please, tourism & hunting could work together...I don't  like it but it's reality.


@kitcat51 

 

I would prefer that they be transported to another location.

Personally, I do not consider living beings as resources.

"Animals are not my whole world, but they have made my world whole" ~ Roger Caras
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Posts: 6,527
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: No words...

[ Edited ]

There seems to be concern over the number of elephant-human interactions, possinbly escalating. They didn't say "overpopulation" but elephants have been off limits, IIRC, for some years.  

 

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@Ko wrote:

BAFFLING / I hex awful things on those that BUY the rights to KILL those gorgeous animals.


@Ko  Will hexing get you karma?

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@Porcelain wrote:

@esme wrote:

I asked seriously why this was being allowed...and someone found it inappropriate?

 

I'll try again.  

Why is this being allowed?  It isn't to raise money for the government as environmentalists wanted to buy the permits and not use them but they were not allowed to.  Maybe it's government's effort to support the expedition operators?  That doesn't sound reasonable either.

 

Has anyone read the purpose of this?  Surely it isn't to control the population...is it?

 


Feel free to go destroy an elephant. You don't need an excuse. You can destroy a lot of beautiful things and no one can stop you. We all can. Yet only a few of us do. There are many good reasons so few of us do.


@Porcelain For clarification...since you quoted me, does "you" mean me specifically?  Or do you mean everyone?

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@esme wrote:

@Porcelain wrote:

@esme wrote:

I asked seriously why this was being allowed...and someone found it inappropriate?

 

I'll try again.  

Why is this being allowed?  It isn't to raise money for the government as environmentalists wanted to buy the permits and not use them but they were not allowed to.  Maybe it's government's effort to support the expedition operators?  That doesn't sound reasonable either.

 

Has anyone read the purpose of this?  Surely it isn't to control the population...is it?

 


Feel free to go destroy an elephant. You don't need an excuse. You can destroy a lot of beautiful things and no one can stop you. We all can. Yet only a few of us do. There are many good reasons so few of us do.


@Porcelain For clarification...since you quoted me, does "you" mean me specifically?  Or do you mean everyone?


I have no idea where you are coming from. If you wish to share how you feel about killing elephants, go right ahead. I doubt you will change my mind.

When you’re accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression.
"Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic." - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr
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Shame on you.. President Mokgweetsi Masisi

 

Masisi's decision to lift the hunting ban last year was highly praised by local communities but derided by conservationists and ignited tension between former Pres. Khama and Masisi.

 

Image

 

Proponents of lifting the ban point to the elephants’ negative impact on Botswana’s human communities.  

According to the IUCN, close human elephant interaction in limited territory finds the towering behemoths killing local farmers’ livestock; stomping over crops; damaging grain stores; houses and water supplies; and even injuring or killing those who get in their way. Freely roaming elephants can also damage local ecosystems by tearing down trees.

 

Some 27,000 elephants live outside of the country’s wildlife management areas and regularly enter into conflicts with rural farmers, says Erik Verreynne, a wildlife veterinarian and consultant based in Gaborone, Botswana, in an interview with The NYTimes.

 

The results can be devastating: As Gail Potgieter, a carnivore conservationist based in Botswana, writes in an editorial for local news outlet the 'Patriot', elephants roaming the country have killed 36 people over the past two years. The father of one victim, a man who was trampled to death while returning from a night out with friends, told reporters, “I used to like elephants, [but] they did a cruel thing to me.”

 

Potgieter says that many local farmers have lost their annual harvest in the span of just a few nights. The elephants’ presence has “effectively imposed a curfew on any human movement after dark,” she adds, so simply visiting a friend’s house at the end of the day can become life threatening.

 

“Sharing their lives with a five ton animal that threatens their lives, destroys their crops, damages their properties..I share their anguish,” as Mike Chase, director of Elephants Without Borders, tells National Geographic. “When you’ve tried all kinds of alternatives and they’re still dangerous, the animal has to be destroyed. At least the communities should be able to benefit by letting a hunter come in and pay to do it.”

 

Expanding on this sentiment, Erik Verreynne points out that rural villages rarely benefit from income generated by safari tourism, but instead bear the highest costs of human elephant conflict. Although hunting probably won’t “meaningfully reduce the number of elephants,” an influx in revenue could help cover damage and otherwise provide financial support for local communities.

 

A man was trampled to death by an elephant while on his way to work in Kasane on April 26, 2019. Here, his mother holds his picture.

 

A man was trampled to death by an elephant while on his way to work in Kasane on April 26, 2019. Here, his mother holds his picture. (MONIRUL BHUIYAN/AFP/Getty Images)

 

SMITHSONIANMAG.COM
MAY 24, 2019
 
I still don't like it ! Should be another way......