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Honored Contributor
Posts: 36,757
Registered: ‎08-19-2010

Re: Neighborly requirement??


@shy bobcat wrote:

 


@2blonde wrote:

If the fence is on the neighbor's property, then it's his/her responsibility to pay for it and maintain it.  Has this neighbor asked you for a contribution?  If so, that's your choice, but remember it will still be part of the property where it is actually located.


My neighbor has not asked for a contribution and the fence will be on their property.


Count your blessings

Honored Contributor
Posts: 36,757
Registered: ‎08-19-2010

Re: Neighborly requirement??


@shy bobcat wrote:

The chain link fence was put up by my neighbor when they got a dog and it's inside their property line. They will take it down when they get the wooden fence.  I know that I don't have to pay anything toward this fence but we've been good neighbors for years and I don't want to tarnish the relationship we have. Nonetheless, I really don't like contributing to a project that isn't my choice.


Believe me if he wanted money you would know it

Honored Contributor
Posts: 33,221
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Neighborly requirement??


@tends2dogs wrote:

@santorini wrote:

You're kind to want to offer.  I've done it both ways in the past.  If they're paying for all of it, you will get the "ugly" side (the cross-bar reinforcement Xs showing instead of the pristine straight wood lines).  Smiley Happy 


That isn't how it is where I live.  A fence requires a permit and has to be so far off the lot line (can't remember how far), but it can not be on the lot line.  Also, the most attractive side goes toward the neighbor.  I have noticed this seems to be the case on most flip shows on HGTV.  The cross bars go on the inside of the property...facing the owner of the fence.


NOT the way it works here.  You buy the fence, you put the pretty side inside to your lawn.  

 

There are also issues about a fence that has been up for so long being the boundry no matter what the actual survey says. So if someone puts up a fence and you don't agree with the property as the fence defines, get a lawyer right then.  At least where we live.

 

My parents had to go to court over it.  All of the houses in our development have fences.  Mostly wooden ones and usually 8 feet.  Some people have brick columns instead of posts and some have all brick fencing mostly on the street side. 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,944
Registered: ‎03-19-2016

Re: Neighborly requirement??

@shy bobcat   I used to do paralegal title examinations for several law firms. 
 Many of the comments here are correct. The fence is your neighbors. It is his decision and It's his responsibility. You shouldn't offer to pay!
 Fences can cause problems. Ie, if you pay a portion and a tree falls on it who fixes it? 
  Make certain it's on his side of the property line, with the good side facing you! 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,944
Registered: ‎03-19-2016

Re: Neighborly requirement??

What people have described is called Adverse possession, meaning that if his fence is over your property line it can be his. In some areas there is time involved.

 My neighbor and I HAD been friends for over 40 years. I cared for her pets when they were away. I helped her when she was ill. We traveled together.
 She had her lot surveyed and built a cheap split rail fence just on her side. Then she put wire on my side. When they were doing a terrible job I asked her to look at it and she said she had to go to the post office. I told her that I can put up a taller privacy fence next to it. She sad "okay".

  There was a path between our lots through the woods. We used It rather than go to the street. She left her fence with an opening to the path. 
 When I built my fence I closed the entrance to the path because if my lot was sold it could be a perceived easement. 
  I had permission from the county (after sending photos) to build my fence with the good side facing mine. 
  We only speak now in case of emergencies. 

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,735
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Neighborly requirement??

[ Edited ]


@1Snickers wrote:

@shy bobcat   I used to do paralegal title examinations for several law firms. 
 Many of the comments here are correct. The fence is your neighbors. It is his decision and It's his responsibility. You shouldn't offer to pay!
 Fences can cause problems. Ie, if you pay a portion and a tree falls on it who fixes it? 
  Make certain it's on his side of the property line, with the good side facing you! 


@1Snickers 

This is not the law where I live. If he pays and it’s on his property, the good side of the fence faces him

"Breathe in, breathe out, move on." Jimmy Buffett
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,954
Registered: ‎05-08-2010

Re: Neighborly requirement??


@proudlyfromNJ wrote:

@KingstonsMom wrote:

@proudlyfromNJ 

 

I can appreciate that, but we don't have such ordinances here and that's not how it is usually done.

 

 

 

 


@KingstonsMom  Oh yes, I know every place has different ordinances. Just wanted to say the way they do it around here. I didn’t realize that it is unusual.


@IG and @proudlyfromNJ   I wasn't trying to suggest in my post that it is done this way everywhere either.  I just wanted to say that it has always been done this way where I own a home up north.  If it wasn't an ordinance, I would most likely put the nicer side in my range of vision.

Fear not Brothers and Sisters! I have read THE BOOK..........we win!!!
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,007
Registered: ‎11-21-2011

Re: Neighborly requirement??

I don't think you should worry about this at all. I can't imagine that someone who has decided to replace their fence would even think of asking the neighbor to pay for it and it seems they haven't. So no chance of damaging the relationship.

 

And if I were putting a fence up I wouldn't want any help anyway. I'd feel like it gave the neighbor some claim of what type or color or whatever.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,812
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Neighborly requirement??

When we had our chain link fence replaced with wood, we were well aware of you can't put the fence on said property line, of course we wouldn't of done that either as that can cause issues with neighbor.  Thank goodness our lots are large enough so that wouldn't bother anyone on either side of behind us.

 

  If memory serves me, the fence behind our house is like 3-4 inches off the neighbors property line.  Makes common sense to put the pretty side out, our fencing company ask before they put it up. 

 

 

Go VOLS
Rocky Top you'll always be home sweet home to me.. Good ole Rocky Top, Rocky Top Tennessee... Rocky Top Tennessee
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,346
Registered: ‎05-19-2010

Re: Neighborly requirement??

[ Edited ]

Maybe it's a regional thing, but in my area I've NEVER seen the 'ugly' side of a fence facing the outside. When we moved into our house there was a 6 foot wooden fence in the backyard, 'ugly' side facing us, not our neighbors.

 

I've seen hundreds of fences over the years, not just in my area but in other states, and I have yet to see one with the 'ugly' side facing out towards the neighbors or the street.

 

Would you believe there is etiquette about this? The underlined portion below makes perfect sense to me .....

 

https://blog.fenceauthority.com/fence-etiquette-who-gets-the-good-side/

 

Face the finished side of the fence toward your neighbor


Certain kinds of fences have a finished side or a “good” side that looks smoother and more polished than the side with the rails and posts showing. In particular, the solid panel fences often used for privacy are generally constructed like this. The finished side should face toward your neighbor. Not only is this more polite, but it’s the standard. Your property will look a lot nicer with the “good” side facing the outside world. Otherwise, your fence will look like it was installed backward.


However, many other types of fences look identical on both sides, and they’re often called “good neighbor fences” for this reason. You can install a double-sided privacy fence if you don’t like the way the inside of a fence looks. Double-sided fences are created with “sandwich construction,” which also makes them stronger.