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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,214
Registered: ‎09-24-2011

QUESTION FOR BAKERS

 

 

I was reading thru Easter dessert recipes on- forum and I recalled the last time I tried making a pudding pie.  The whole thing never set and had to throw it out - yuck!

 

I only buy skim milk.  I use the 'instant' pudding.  Do I have to switch to a whole milk just to make pudding?  Or, is there a way I can get it to set using skim milk?

Super Contributor
Posts: 432
Registered: ‎06-11-2010

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS


@goldenlocks wrote:

 

 

I was reading thru Easter dessert recipes on- forum and I recalled the last time I tried making a pudding pie.  The whole thing never set and had to throw it out - yuck!

 

I only buy skim milk.  I use the 'instant' pudding.  Do I have to switch to a whole milk just to make pudding?  Or, is there a way I can get it to set using skim milk?


I use the pudding that you cook in a pot on top of the stove with 2% milk. Perfect pudding pie everytime! 

I also make "real whipped cream" to put on top of the pudding pie. Yummy!!!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,649
Registered: ‎09-12-2010

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS

@goldenlocks, I use 2% milk with instant puddings and it works fine, but I can't imagine using skim milk. Whole milk works the best and I'm thinking of switching back to it from 2%.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,214
Registered: ‎09-24-2011

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS

Thanks, @pugvette74@jannabelle .

 

I''ll have to pick up a quart next time.  

 

I';; pick up some Fairlife which I was gonna use for yogurt, so will try that for the pudding pie.  (Yum, I'm getting hungryWoman Wink.)

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,046
Registered: ‎11-06-2011

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS

[ Edited ]

@goldenlocks - Yes, if you want your pudding to set properly and be thick enough, you'll need to use milk that has fat in it. I like skim milk, too, but it doesn't work well in most baking applications. Good luck!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,046
Registered: ‎11-06-2011

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS

P.S. Here's my favorite handy-dandy milk comparison chart in case it is helpful:

 

~milkfat.jpg

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,838
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS

@goldenlocks  If you use light (or half light and half heavy) whipping cream, instant pudding will be thick and lush.  I even use it with cooked pudding for not only a richer taste but thicker creamier set up.  A desert that isn't appealing and not that tasty is not worth eating.  I bake a lot and would never use anything but full fat or whipping cream to bake with.  You can buy whipping cream in smaller containers.  

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,214
Registered: ‎09-24-2011

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS


@Pook wrote:

@goldenlocks  If you use light (or half light and half heavy) whipping cream, instant pudding will be thick and lush.  I even use it with cooked pudding for not only a richer taste but thicker creamier set up.  A desert that isn't appealing and not that tasty is not worth eating.  I bake a lot and would never use anything but full fat or whipping cream to bake with.  You can buy whipping cream in smaller containers.  

 


Thanks, @Pook .  Thinking might go with whipping cream, then can use leftover for coffee!

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,214
Registered: ‎09-24-2011

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS

Thank you for the chart, @loriqvc .  I hadn't realized there was that much of a difference in milk!

 

We do a lot of organic fat free 'cause my Eddy needs extra protein.  The rescue said to feed him puppy kibble, but the vet said that's too fattening. So, I use milk and veggies for the extra protein!  Glad they all have same amount of protein.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,046
Registered: ‎11-06-2011

Re: QUESTION FOR BAKERS

@goldenlocks - I really like the chart because its statistics are much more specific for my brain than the simple "percentage" approach to describing milk (plus I don't have to spend time rummaging through the refrigerator case to compare cartons when I'm trying to decide which option I need/want).