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Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,859
Registered: ‎08-08-2010

Another look at a method for controlling...

the over purchase of home decor, kitchen or holiday decor items.

 

My mom needs (desperately) new carpeting. She has been putting it off and yesterday we went to look and see just what would be in her budget.

 

We were pleasantly surprised that the high end carpet she wanted was coming in at a price that we expected for a much less quality (and elegant) carpet. It appears that she will not only be getting carpet, but won't have to settle for a quality or style that she doesn't like in order to stay on budget, as that is what we thought might happen.

 

So, it confirmed some things I have been thinking about for quite some time. 

 

I think we often settle for something(s) because we really can't afford (or maybe we can't justify) what we really want or what we really need. And sales tactics at places like QVC kind of foster that. 

 

Like when your mattress is shot, killing your back and they say, "Maybe you can't afford that new mattress right now, but for $200 this topper and a new pad will make it feel like new", as they try to convince us this is true. Or how about the " New sheets and  a new comforter set, and some new towels will make that master suit look refreshed and updated"....when in fact you need paint and flooring way more than you need sheets and towels. 

 

So in our minds, we often do two things.

 

 First,We think we can't afford something, because we don't really get down and dirty with the getting estimates or go looking at things. 

 

Second, we talk ourselves into settling for a cheaper fix because a project is really expensive and more than we truly can afford right now, when in fact that money spent for some instant gratification,would contribute significantly over time, to getting done what we really need or want. 

 

I've been telling myself for the last couple of years, that I must stop buying kitchen stuff and put that money toward the kitchen remodel itself. No more new dishes, or this thing or that thing is going to refresh or makeover my tired and worn out kitchen any more than it already has. And that has allowed me to cut back to just a couple of purchases per year of small or cheaper things.

 

I'm feeling that way about home decor too. I did a lot of changing of my 'look' in the main level of my home. Now, I'm done with the little things. I want and need bigger things. I want (really need as much as want) paint, carpet, crown moulding, etc. Another lantern or flameless candle is not going to get me those things, and isn't going to make the space look any better than the ones I bought already. My focus  needs to go towards decorating my spaces with what I already have and love, and concentrate my spending/saving towards getting the bigger things that I have spent too much time and money trying to compensate for with smaller things.

 

Common problems, simple answers. It's just the getting on board and sticking to it that becomes a bit of a problem. 

Regular Contributor
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎05-28-2015

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...

I agree completely with what you have explained so articulately. That is how we have been making purchases recently, including a bathroom remodel and some new living room furniture. We are extremely frugal in many small ways, and it adds up to being able to get what you need and want in other ways. I think it takes maturity and patience to reach that point. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,604
Registered: ‎07-28-2012

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...

I also agree with what you said. We have never bought furniture or major appliances on credit, we wait till we have the extra money, or in emergencies like a fridge or range going out suddenly, we take some out of savings if we don't have cash on hand. Making constant payments on CC's keeps you broke also, so those e-z pays are a deal breaker for me.
"To each their own, in all things".
Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,086
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...

Sounds good and you have your new plans in order...

 

This year we get our last 2 exterior walls sided and I'll be painting them in October. Then next year we plan on having our upstairs bathroom with just 2 updates...a new tiled floor and a nicer - more user friendly cabinet which will free up a shelf in our linen closet!

The downstairs 1/2 bath will just have the same floor tiles put in. 

 

Neither bathroom needs the floor done yet, but I never really liked the linoleum what is there now, but lived with it. The tiles will be the same as the ones we put in our kitchen about 3-4 yrs ago. We ordered extra tiles at that time, enough to do the 2 bathrooms, but haven't found the right time to get them done. 

 

Neither are big scale projects, but will be great changes nonetheless.

 

Here is a before and after pic of our kitchen from a few years ago. The before pic shows the same linoleum floor which is still in our bathrooms.

 

Before we ripped up the linoleum...

P1510065.JPG

 

New tiles...

P1510083.JPG

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,604
Registered: ‎07-28-2012

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...

@Susan Louise, very nice. We did the same thing when we redid the kitchen flooring with wood laminate planks, we bought enough to do the bathroom just off the hall. Now, when I find the new vanity I want for in there, we already have the flooring.
"To each their own, in all things".
Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,086
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...

[ Edited ]

@Snicks1 wrote:
@Susan Louise, very nice. We did the same thing when we redid the kitchen flooring with wood laminate planks, we bought enough to do the bathroom just off the hall. Now, when I find the new vanity I want for in there, we already have the flooring.

 

@Snicks1  Thank you Smiley Happy

When DH and I were checking out the types of flooring, we read info about making sure to get what you need and a bit extra because it happens rather often that colors/designs/brands can become obsolete even after one year if it doesn't sell enough or the company goes out of business, etc.

We would never had thought we had to worry about that...didn't even cross our mind. 

The short stack of boxes of tiles for the bathrooms are right next to our dryer downstairs in the basement. I'll be glad when they are finally installed...LOL

 

Your kitchen sounds great with the wood planks. I would never think to use wood in the bathroom though. Do they do well resisting moisture? Smiley Happy

Regular Contributor
Posts: 175
Registered: ‎07-23-2017

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...

I don't know.  I don't think many mature women who have the money to take care of the big, important things do that.  I don't know of anyone who badly needs a new mattress but opts for a new comforter just because it cost less than a mattress.  I don't see that happening.  I do think that people on fixed budgets might opt for what my auntie called the "quick and dirty" if they cannot afford to do something big.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,859
Registered: ‎08-08-2010

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...


@Natasha218 wrote:

I don't know.  I don't think many mature women who have the money to take care of the big, important things do that.  I don't know of anyone who badly needs a new mattress but opts for a new comforter just because it cost less than a mattress.  I don't see that happening.  I do think that people on fixed budgets might opt for what my auntie called the "quick and dirty" if they cannot afford to do something big.  


 

I don't know what mature has to do with it, but many people are easily sidetracked or looking for instant gratification in making something that they want to do, cheaper and easier. 

 

It's a great sales tactic, and many people of all economic means fall for it for a time, or in certain instances. And not just here at QVC, but get the same idea from watching many of the programs on TV, wanting to create a new look or something additional or better than they have. They don't have the means to do it in it's complete form, so do what seem like quick fixes in hopes of pacifying the desire or need for at least some amount of time.

 

And the point is that it usually happens when people don't have the immediate financial means to do the big important things. 

 

Some people have plenty of money to do what they want in any given circumstances, or at least enough to do what they need. Many do not. So they make quick fixes, or convince themselves that a lick and a promise will do, when in fact it often doesn't and valuable resources (time and money) are wasted in trying to do so.

 

So yes, it is about money mostly, but the comforter and sheets is about ignoring the fact you need paint and carpet to make the room look better. A mattress topper would be the low cost fix for a mattress that is past it's prime. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,364
Registered: ‎04-19-2010

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...

If I reflect on my youth and what my parents saw as essential and compare it to today’s standard, it’s apparent that a major shift has occurred. Perhaps this is true in all generations, but I am sure that I can get by on far less than what I have accumulated and actually use what I have rather than store it! When I realized how much of what I purged the last few years was lightly used or seldom worn it was a wake up call.

 

@mominohio I agree on your plan to stop buying multiples of items or new decor if what one really needs is a major purchase. Quality is important to me too. The tiger to tame was my bad habit of thinking that a purchase under $50 wouldn’t impact my long-term plans. Impulse buying is Q’s bread & butter. I really improved when I waited a bit to actually purchase and realized that many items in the shopping cart don’t have the same appeal after a few hours. I never bought beyond my budget, but I still wasted too much. Buying thoughtfully with a splurge once in awhile has improved my wallet and my storage problem without feeling deprived. This is what worked for me; everyone’s story and solution will be unique to them.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,859
Registered: ‎08-08-2010

Re: Another look at a method for controlling...


@SunValley wrote:

If I reflect on my youth and what my parents saw as essential and compare it to today’s standard, it’s apparent that a major shift has occurred. Perhaps this is true in all generations, but I am sure that I can get by on far less than what I have accumulated and actually use what I have rather than store it! When I realized how much of what I purged the last few years was lightly used or seldom worn it was a wake up call.

 

@mominohio I agree on your plan to stop buying multiples of items or new decor if what one really needs is a major purchase. Quality is important to me too. The tiger to tame was my bad habit of thinking that a purchase under $50 wouldn’t impact my long-term plans. Impulse buying is Q’s bread & butter. I really improved when I waited a bit to actually purchase and realized that many items in the shopping cart don’t have the same appeal after a few hours. I never bought beyond my budget, but I still wasted too much. Buying thoughtfully with a splurge once in awhile has improved my wallet and my storage problem without feeling deprived. This is what worked for me; everyone’s story and solution will be unique to them.


 

@SunValley

 

Spot on!