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Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,153
Registered: ‎05-22-2012

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?


@1jenniferjuniper wrote:

She is renting not the owner of the condo she is living in. It would be the owners responsibility to report things not hers.

Prehaps you should go back and read the orginal post, CP.


 

That's ridiculous. I've never heard of a city with any kind of ordinance that says only property owners can report things to the city. Most cities encourage people to report things like this. I reported a vacant lost a few weeks ago because they had automatic sprinklers going on single day  while it was also raining every day for a month and we've been in a drought for years. The day I called, the water was overflowing into the streets because they'd been watering completely saturated ground. I haven't seen the sprinklers on there since I reported it.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,179
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

Is it possible the new owners live out of state? Maybe they are not aware of the situation. I am glad the op reported it. It effects everyone. 

Super Contributor
Posts: 410
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

The condo owner is liable and problem will be addressed with the owner not the renter. The HOA is aware of the problem.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,960
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?


@Reiki604 wrote:

You've done everything you can do. I would also send a certfied letter to the HOA and my landlord to document what is happening. If it were me, I'd start looking for a new place to live given the man who lives next door who is cleaning the outside all the time and now this, it sounds like a 'unusual' place to live. I'm not sure I'd be completely comfortable there.


 

oh, I didn't realize it was the same neighborhood. LOL

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

You could find it on your county's website and the lenders name would be listed there, then the HOA could notify them it appears to be abandoned. I bet they would do something right away.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,486
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

[ Edited ]

 

People will move into a vacant house, and maybe set fires to warm themselves, as the electricity will be off.  Once strangers establish residency as "squatters" it can be hard to get them to leave.

 

The OP is concerned in this matter, as it will have an impact on her safety and perhaps even become a health hazard.  I don't live in a HOA community, but would be down at the town hall discussing the situation with the Code people. 

 

Actually, my next door neighbor abandoned his house (left for a new job but didn't pay all his bills) and it was vacant for a year.  It didnt trouble me so much because the doors and windows were locked and even reinforced with the storm shutters.

 

Several of my neighbors were concerned about the condition of the swimming pool, which literally became a water resort for raccoons, and reported the matter to the code enforcer for our town.  They knew b/c they are nosy and got over a tall fence.  I had seen the raccoons, but they are pretty frequent in my area anyhow.  Code visited the property and poured bleach in the pool, which only made me worry about the raccoons. I'm still worried about the neighbor himself--he was a very, very nice person with a great young family of kids and must have had a bad situation to contend with.

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,128
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

Chynna - LOL pink flamingos aren't allowed? I better bring mine in!! (Just kidding)

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,139
Registered: ‎04-16-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

To the OP:

 

I rented an end-of-group TH for 6 years in a very nice community. The EOG next to me (and attatched to the next 4 TH's) was vacant when I moved in. Last year, I bought an EOG in the same community but a few cul-de-sacs over. The house I was renting was also for sale but I refused to buy it due to the vacant house plus my lender (VA) was concerned about it. Here's why:

 

1) Vandals, squaters, drug users (until the house was finally secured, it was often used by whomever as grafetti, needles, condoms and other items were found inside and outside the house)

 

2) Structural damage: mold inside; wet/soggy floor; vines growing in and around the electical box/heating system; buckling hardwoods; rats, racoons, pigens and their nests inside and outside; deck pulling away from the house( 2 story deck); open windows; sewage overflow from toilets and more.

 

3) Safety: if a fire started...then what? If the deck pulled off the house, then what? The damage to the other TH's (including mine being only 8 ft away) could be devestating.

 

Lawn was a nightmare. Found out is was a foreclosure and was being sold to bank after bank in a bundle. The owners are NO LONGER responsible once the bank takes it. Often, these owners will rip out everything to sell or to spite the bank and leave it ruined but not enough for the county to condemn it. This may be why you saw all the dumpsters and then...nothing. Buyers go in with a high-risk loan or a loan from overseas banks/organizations (google and get an eyeful- this was the situation with the house next to me), stripped for the parts and then abandon it AND the loan.

 

The HOA/management can do nothing. I was shocked, the neighbors were shocked but it's true; foreclosures can not be touched by them. You can report it to the county as an abandoned property/drug house/criminal activity as a citizen but it comes down to the bank. And banks are in NO RUSH to do anything; believe me. it's  and pathetic but it's how the business works.

 

So, OP, DO contact your landlord. DO contact the county health department, DO contact the county  Dept of Zoneing/Housing, DO contact the police if you see anyone go in the house. Do this because it's your neighborhood and it can and will only get worse as word gets out there is an abandoned house open to all as well as open to the elements.

 

Good luck, I've been there and it stinks.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,458
Registered: ‎03-18-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

I'm a Pres. of our HOA -- we have 120 attached single family residences in a gated community.  The management company should be on top of this and send a certified, return receipt letter to the owner.  This would certainly be unacceptable in our community.  You have every right to be concerned about this!  Having an open door could present a problem as someone could get hurt inside the house.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,356
Registered: ‎08-08-2010

Re: What Would You Think if This House Was on Your Street?

I was under the impression that this is exactly why people want to live in a development that has a HOA. If it were me, I'd demand the HOA get the place secured, or try to gather together the others in the area, and withold my dues until something was done. HOA's are supposed to protect you and your investment from this kind of thing. If not, what is the use of living with all the restrictions and paying the money.

 

I hope they get is resolved soon. Such things can really drag down the surrounding property value, and attract drifters and nerdowell types.