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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,523
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

This story has been a favorite of mine for many years.  Hopefully you will recognize the message and enjoy reading it. 

 

  Tucked away in our subconscious is an idyllic vision.  We see ourselves on a long trip that spans the continent.  We are traveling by train.  Out the windows we drink in the passing cars on nearby highways, of children waving at crossings, of smoke pouring from a power plant, of row upon row of corn and  wheat, of flatlands and valleys, of mountains and rolling hillsides, of city skylines and village halls.

     But uppermost in our minds is the final destination.

On a certain day, at a certain hour we will pull into the station.  Bands will be playing and flags waving.  Once we get there so many wonderful dreams will come true, and the pieces of our lives will fit together like a complete jigsaw puzzle.  How restlessly we pace the aisles, damning the minutes for loitering -- waiting, waiting for the station.

     "When we reach the station, that will be it!" we cry. "When I'm eighteen." "When I buy a new 450SL Mercedes Benz." "When I put the kids through college!" "When I have paid off the mortgage!"  "When I get a promotion!" "When I reach the age of retirement, I shall live happily ever after!"

     Sooner or later we  must realize there is no station, no one place to arrive at once and for all.  The true joy of life is the trip.  The station is only a dream.  It constantly outdistances us.

     "Relish the moment" is a good motto.  We will rejoice and be glad in it.  It isn't the burdens of today that drive men mad.  It is the regrets over yesterday and the fear of tomorrow.  Regret and fear are twin thieves who rob us of today.

      So stop pacing the aisles and counting the miles.  Instead, climb more mountains, eat more ice cream, go barefoot more often, swim more rivers, laugh more, cry less.  Life must be lived as we go along, the station will come soon enough.

 

                        Robert J. Hastings

 

     

     

 

The moving finger writes; And having writ, Moves on: nor all your Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line Nor all your Tears Wash out a Word of it. Omar Khayam
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,143
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Wow great read. 🙏❤️☕️

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,852
Registered: ‎12-02-2013

Yes, I remember that powerful vision of the journey to the station.

 

I have graduated schools, corporate programs, received promotions, won and lost battles, paid off the mortgage on  several houses, celebrated over 50 years of marriage with the love of my life, retired, stayed healthy, etc, etc.

 

The station that will come is more like the door at the top of the stairs: the entrance to eternity.  Hopefully I will have lived this journey in such a way as to be greeted by a " band " of angels to celebrate the final homecoming.

We make a living by what we get. We make a life by what we give.
Sir Winston Churchill
Valued Contributor
Posts: 632
Registered: ‎03-16-2020

Thank you for sharing that story @Lindsays Grandma ! It really hit home for me!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,877
Registered: ‎06-13-2010

@Lindsays Grandma 

 

                             So stop pacing the aisles and counting the miles.  Instead, climb more mountains, eat more ice cream, go barefoot more often, swim more rivers, laugh more, cry less.  Life must be lived as we go alongthe station will come soon enough.👍👍

 

I can certainly understand why this spirit lifting message is your favorite! It evokes very calm emotions.😊 

 

~~~All we need is LOVE💖

 

 

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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,523
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

@jlkz ...You have accomplished more in your life than most people have, and you aren't finished.  You should feel very proud of yourself, and I too believe in that door at the top of the stairs.  Heart

The moving finger writes; And having writ, Moves on: nor all your Piety nor Wit Shall lure it back to cancel half a Line Nor all your Tears Wash out a Word of it. Omar Khayam
Valued Contributor
Posts: 745
Registered: ‎07-26-2019

When I was a very young woman, I did very little life planning. I was sure that as I aged all of life's answers would magically appear to me. That really didn't happen. This is what I have always referred to as the myth of youth. I was very motivated in my careers, and did very well. Now that I'm retired, I find myself questioning why I pushed myself so hard. The jobs meant nothing really.

 

The hardest part of life is finding and knowing one's inner dreams and to keep moving forward. I don't think there is an end.