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Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,259
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@guatmum wrote:

Passive restraint can be done a number of ways but is very much on the same line as saving someone who is drowning.  When I've done it, there was always one other adult in the room.  The other adult distracts the child while I come up behind him/her.  The goal is to grab their wrists from behind and cross their arms and yours around the front of them in a gentle but firm hug (your head held way back so you don't end up with a broken nose).  If that doesn't calm them (it often does), then you drop yourself to the floor with them coming down on your lap and you wrap your legs around theirs.  It's all done firmly but not violently and without any loud talking or shouting.  With some kids, sitting in this position while rocking forward and back and quietly humming works well.  Then a quiet talk ensues.  Passive restraint by definition has to be done by someone significantly bigger than the child.  For some, that's the teacher.  For others, that is another designated staff member for whom you can wait once the rest of the kids are cleared from the room.


Thank you. What prevents the child from biting one's arms?

Super Contributor
Posts: 486
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@occasionalrain wrote:

@guatmum wrote:

Passive restraint can be done a number of ways but is very much on the same line as saving someone who is drowning.  When I've done it, there was always one other adult in the room.  The other adult distracts the child while I come up behind him/her.  The goal is to grab their wrists from behind and cross their arms and yours around the front of them in a gentle but firm hug (your head held way back so you don't end up with a broken nose).  If that doesn't calm them (it often does), then you drop yourself to the floor with them coming down on your lap and you wrap your legs around theirs.  It's all done firmly but not violently and without any loud talking or shouting.  With some kids, sitting in this position while rocking forward and back and quietly humming works well.  Then a quiet talk ensues.  Passive restraint by definition has to be done by someone significantly bigger than the child.  For some, that's the teacher.  For others, that is another designated staff member for whom you can wait once the rest of the kids are cleared from the room.


Thank you. What prevents the child from biting one's arms?


Getting bitten can happen but is very difficult if you have your arms holding theirs in a crisscross around their stomach and you're big enough to pin down the entire length of each arm. Holding them firmly makes it almost impossible for them to bend enough to get their mouth on you.   I've never gotten bitten but I'm quite tall and no lightweight - LOL!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,297
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

I have only been able to find a couple of articles on this situation after reading this thread.  I was surprised to find the child has ADHD.  I was getting the impression he was autisitc.  I am asking honestly, because I don't know...does labeling a child with ADHD make them special needs or special ed?  I ask because I have a child with special needs and in all the years of having her in schools, none of the other special needs kids were there for having ADHD.   I mean I have friends whose sons have been labeled ADHD so I've been around them, one in particular a lot.  Complete handful.  I don't know.  In that case the mom always blamed everybody/thing else for what went on.  When my daughter came home and said he was doing karate on her and trying to smother her with a pillow, and I told his mom, her reply to me was it was my daughter's fault.  She should've gotten away from him and come told her.  (And yes, that was the last time she went to his house.)   I feel so badly for the teachers both in this situation and in the spec ed classroom situations.  They can only do so much at school and if their plan to support the child and help keep them in line isn't followed at home, nobody wins.  Again, the info I found was very minimal...was he just being a pain or being violent?  If he was being violent and other children were in danger, yes, something needed to be done; if he was being a pain and not listening to directions, then absolutely ridiculous to resort to that.    Very sad for that child any way you look at it.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,508
Registered: ‎12-22-2013

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

ODD is a component of ADHD in many cases.  Emptying a classroom until help comes sometimes works.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,953
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@Riley1 wrote:

occasionalrain - I have to disagree with you. Children who are special needs don't get the rules as we would. They don't have the mechanism in their brain that says STOP. If I had a nickel for every time I said "that is inappropriate" I'd be a bizillionaire! We did take action and did what was right for our son and family.  But your way of thinking just is unrealistic for a special needs child. 


********************************

 

Thank you for your example Smiley Happy

 

If only it was as simple as quoting Winston Churchill without knowing ADD and ADHD are organic problems, not merely behavioral issues needing discipline. 

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,259
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

G, Whatever you were paid, it wasn't enough. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

So when you are trying to get yourself into this position to grab this child in this very specific manner I guess the child just sits there waiting for you to do this?( yes I am being sarcastic) I am not impressed that this is 100% possible - as a matter of fact I would think the % of times that the teacher is capable of getting into a position to do this while a child is flailing and kicking would be very slim.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,297
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@occasionalrain wrote:

 

It's easy to fault those who intervened when you aren't the one being punched and kicked. I've read excuses for the violent behavior and blame for those in the situation. 

 

I have no issue with this child being handcuffed, if he doesn't learn to act acceptably now when he's older he will find himself  tazed, handcuffed and taken to jail.


Ohmygosh...you are so right.  One young man in particular I know, my daughter was in classes with him...I went round and round with the principal and the teacher that they were doing him no favors looking the other way.  One day he is going to go off on someone in the outside world and end up in jail...and there is no special needs jail cell!  

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,508
Registered: ‎12-22-2013

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

[ Edited ]

Often have a short fuse and little impulse control.........I have seen that maneuver with very young children- kindergarten to first grade.  The boy was in middle school when, in addition to other disorders, hormones are raging and the child might feel "imprisoned" at school.  There are special private schools that deal wonderfully with these problems, but they are very expensive and the ratio of boys to girls is 5:1 so are very difficult to get into.

Valued Contributor
Posts: 767
Registered: ‎07-12-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

Restraints, handcuffs, chains, ropes...gosh why not just punch the kid in the jaw and knock him out? Or perhaps every special teacher should be provided a blow dart full of some sedative...to down the unruly ones when they get out of hand.

 

I think we have to re-think exactly what an educational environment is suppose to be about or provide. If a child isn't equipped to be there, that should be evaluated and considered before placing him or her into what becomes obviously an over-whelming environment. IMO.

 

And as we know, many special needs kids are very bright. They might not be able to control their anger or their bodies or adapt well to stress or confusing situations..but they are bright. And as such, they DO know fear, pain, abuse... and can identify kindness, too.

 

No one wants to be in such a situation - either as a teacher being threatened or as a special needs kid who can't control him/herself. Its not pleasant for anyone. But if the manner in which a bad situation is handled only brings more fear, distrust and problems...its clearly not the best solution.