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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,508
Registered: ‎12-22-2013

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

[ Edited ]

There are other classifications such as ODD, oppositional defiant disorder, and I have had several children thus classified.  Uncontrollable violence is one of the characteristics.  In the public school, it is often difficult to remove this child from the classroom as he is only fulfilling his disorder!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,259
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@151949 wrote:

And could you descfibe , in plain layman english , what "passive restraint" is.


Yes, please give us a play by play.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,953
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@Justice4all wrote:

There are other classifications such as ODD, oppositional defiant disorder, and I have had several children thus classified.  Uncontrollable violence is one of the characteristics.  In the public school, it is often difficult to remove this child from the classroom as he is only fulfilling his disorder!


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Yes, there are.  According to reports, the boy in this story was ADHD, not ODD.

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
Super Contributor
Posts: 486
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

Passive restraint can be done a number of ways but is very much on the same line as saving someone who is drowning.  When I've done it, there was always one other adult in the room.  The other adult distracts the child while I come up behind him/her.  The goal is to grab their wrists from behind and cross their arms and yours around the front of them in a gentle but firm hug (your head held way back so you don't end up with a broken nose).  If that doesn't calm them (it often does), then you drop yourself to the floor with them coming down on your lap and you wrap your legs around theirs.  It's all done firmly but not violently and without any loud talking or shouting.  With some kids, sitting in this position while rocking forward and back and quietly humming works well.  Then a quiet talk ensues.  Passive restraint by definition has to be done by someone significantly bigger than the child.  For some, that's the teacher.  For others, that is another designated staff member for whom you can wait once the rest of the kids are cleared from the room.

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Posts: 486
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Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@NoelSeven wrote:

@Justice4all wrote:

There are other classifications such as ODD, oppositional defiant disorder, and I have had several children thus classified.  Uncontrollable violence is one of the characteristics.  In the public school, it is often difficult to remove this child from the classroom as he is only fulfilling his disorder!


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Yes, there are.  According to reports, the boy in this story was ADHD, not ODD.


Regardless of the child's diagnosis, it is the policy in my district to clear the room of the rest of the kids and leave the child who is tantruming in the room.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,769
Registered: ‎06-19-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

[ Edited ]

Excellent post, Wismis!!

"The quieter you become, the more you can hear". (By Ram Dass, an American Spiritual Teacher) \em>
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,960
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@Songbird1 wrote:

@Justice4all wrote:

I was hit in the head with a full bottle by a special education student who thought it was funny to throw it down the crowded hall.  Missed my eye by a millimeter.  He wasn't disabled that way!


When I was a child at a sleep over camp, I was tormented almost every day by a special needs child.  Why she picked on me, I'll never know. But every day she pinched and kicked me.  I would complain daily to the camp counselor, but to no avail.  Finally the kid grabbed a pencil and stuck in my cheek.  It just missed my eye. The counselor finally did something.  The child was sent home.  Her parents were outraged and threaten to sue.  They finally took the kid back, but she was placed in a different environment. My parents were so upset I went home.


 

When I was in first grade a special needs boy threw a large ceramic flower pot that was sitting on the school window sill at me. It hit me in the hip and I had green,yellow and purple bruises for weeks. I remember the principal coming in to escort him out of the room.

I honestly don't know what the protocol for violent students is, on one hand they deserve to be with their peers, but other students need to be protected too 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,508
Registered: ‎12-22-2013

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

I see....... And the same may apply, as often the diagnosis is complex and individual.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,953
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids


@guatmum wrote:

@NoelSeven wrote:

@Justice4all wrote:

There are other classifications such as ODD, oppositional defiant disorder, and I have had several children thus classified.  Uncontrollable violence is one of the characteristics.  In the public school, it is often difficult to remove this child from the classroom as he is only fulfilling his disorder!


********************************

 

Yes, there are.  According to reports, the boy in this story was ADHD, not ODD.


Regardless of the child's diagnosis, it is the policy in my district to clear the room of the rest of the kids and leave the child who is tantruming in the room.


**********************************************

 

I don't have any problem with that.  I totally agree.

A Thrill Of Hope The Weary World Rejoices
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,555
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Handcuffing Disabled Kids

[ Edited ]

occasionalrain - I have to disagree with you. Children who are special needs don't get the rules as we would. They don't have the mechanism in their brain that says STOP. If I had a nickel for every time I said "that is inappropriate" I'd be a bizillionaire! We did take action and did what was right for our son and family.  But your way of thinking just is unrealistic for a special needs child.