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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,161
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

The misconception still lingers that teachers have summers off. I taught 35 years and always had several days after students finished classes for the summer where staff was still on contract to finish paperwork and records. Always a week for staff development mtgs sometime in late July....then we went back to prepare for the new year 7-10 days before the students returned. We also got paid our salary spread out over twelve months...and teachers earn every penny!
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,161
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

There are so many misconceptions about teaching. Only having spent real time in a classroom with students and full responsibility for their learning would anyone begin to know. I would never have chosen another career....but am glad I retired 5 yrs ago when I see the nonsense coming from various state legislatures regarding curriculum....I would be so fired after a week!
Regular Contributor
Posts: 183
Registered: ‎04-25-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

Yes! Summer Break is the best!!!!! Although I work on a college campus, I have a 10 mo. contract, which makes it nice.😉 I'm very blessed. Happy Summer, EVERYONE! 💖🌞🌅👙🍹🚤!
Education | Sorority Alumna | PGA Foundation | Coffee and Brunch are my thing.
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,840
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

Hey mom! (Cakes) Smiley Happy

@lovesrecess every district is different. I haven’t taught in a school where I had to spend more than 2-3 days of my summer doing professional development for the next year. I haven’t had to do that for a few years now. We literally get the entire summer off and I know many other teachers do as well. I do go in a week early to set up my classroom but it isn’t required.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 26,252
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

@mom2four0418  I don't think most people here (and teachers in general) are saying they don't love teaching or their students.

 

I'm generalizing and I don't mean to speak for other's, just my friends (what I've learned in conversations).

 

In some states it's difficult for teachers to really get to know their students like they did years ago.

 

The area I live in was more rural back when my girls were in elementary school than it is now.  There were actually students who lived in houses that had 'out houses' for bathrooms....Yepper, that would be in the late 70's and 80's.

 

There were students that came from home's where one or more parents were alcoholics (I came from such a home).  Back then my friends (teachers) could hug and hold the children and show more affection to an individual child.  They had the time to visit the home, talk one on one with the parents, etc.

 

That's not true (at least here) today.  My friends saw this difference coming.  Some got out earlier than other's.  It wasn't that they didn't enjoy being teachers.  They did.  They just saw changes (in the way THINGS) were going to be done that they felt like they couldn't abide by.

 

I live in a part of Virginia that sits right on the cusp of change.  We still hold onto our rural living and way of thinking.  However, as more people move out this way they want changes (bringing the city into the country) that many of us do not want.  

 

That is reflected in the school system and everywhere.  My neighbors have chickens, farms, etc.  They don't do it because it's 'the latest thing to do' (as some in the city do).  They do it because it saves them money and they like living like their parents and grandparents did.  Many of them still live in the same house their grandparents and great-grandparents built.

 

They don't like the changes and are fighting them.  THAT's what I think some of us (not necessarily about houses, etc and things I said) but about how limited a teacher is and can be as far as involved in a student.

 

You see this a lot in Washington, DC.  We are always seeing stories about teachers TRYING to get more involved in their students and their student's lives and sometimes it doesn't do much good or they get pushed out of the system for it.  

 

Unfortunately, D.C. has a terrible time keeping teachers who are well-qualified and enjoy teaching and love the students.  They love their students but often their hands are tied in one way or another.

 

THAT's what I was talking about anyway.  I don't know about other's.  But I don't think it's fair to simply say, "if you're not happy....get out".  

 

I very much doubt that's what the OP was talking about.  Everyone needs a rest from their job.  If your children are teachers you (and they) know better than most that it isn't a 9 to 5 job.  

 

Everyone needs time to rest and recuperate.  My guess is that is what the OP is talking about.  I'm not speaking FOR her, just what I read into the post.  My guess is she's an amazing teacher and person, just is happy to get some rest and relaxation.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,874
Registered: ‎09-18-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

Hope you have a happy, restful summer, @Mellie32.

My daughter in law is a teacher. I can honestly say, I don't know how you all do it.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,748
Registered: ‎04-23-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!


@Annabellethecat wrote:

@mom2four0418  I don't think most people here (and teachers in general) are saying they don't love teaching or their students.

 

I'm generalizing and I don't mean to speak for other's, just my friends (what I've learned in conversations).

 

In some states it's difficult for teachers to really get to know their students like they did years ago.

 

The area I live in was more rural back when my girls were in elementary school than it is now.  There were actually students who lived in houses that had 'out houses' for bathrooms....Yepper, that would be in the late 70's and 80's.

 

There were students that came from home's where one or more parents were alcoholics (I came from such a home).  Back then my friends (teachers) could hug and hold the children and show more affection to an individual child.  They had the time to visit the home, talk one on one with the parents, etc.

 

That's not true (at least here) today.  My friends saw this difference coming.  Some got out earlier than other's.  It wasn't that they didn't enjoy being teachers.  They did.  They just saw changes (in the way THINGS) were going to be done that they felt like they couldn't abide by.

 

I live in a part of Virginia that sits right on the cusp of change.  We still hold onto our rural living and way of thinking.  However, as more people move out this way they want changes (bringing the city into the country) that many of us do not want.  

 

That is reflected in the school system and everywhere.  My neighbors have chickens, farms, etc.  They don't do it because it's 'the latest thing to do' (as some in the city do).  They do it because it saves them money and they like living like their parents and grandparents did.  Many of them still live in the same house their grandparents and great-grandparents built.

 

They don't like the changes and are fighting them.  THAT's what I think some of us (not necessarily about houses, etc and things I said) but about how limited a teacher is and can be as far as involved in a student.

 

You see this a lot in Washington, DC.  We are always seeing stories about teachers TRYING to get more involved in their students and their student's lives and sometimes it doesn't do much good or they get pushed out of the system for it.  

 

Unfortunately, D.C. has a terrible time keeping teachers who are well-qualified and enjoy teaching and love the students.  They love their students but often their hands are tied in one way or another.

 

THAT's what I was talking about anyway.  I don't know about other's.  But I don't think it's fair to simply say, "if you're not happy....get out".  

 

I very much doubt that's what the OP was talking about.  Everyone needs a rest from their job.  If your children are teachers you (and they) know better than most that it isn't a 9 to 5 job.  

 

Everyone needs time to rest and recuperate.  My guess is that is what the OP is talking about.  I'm not speaking FOR her, just what I read into the post.  My guess is she's an amazing teacher and person, just is happy to get some rest and relaxation.



Please see post #14. I made it clear that I was not referring to the OP. As I stated previously, if a teacher (perhaps one of your friends) no longer wants to teach for whatever reason, it is best to move on to some other profession.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,991
Registered: ‎12-17-2012

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

Enjoy your "Freedom" @Mellie32 .  Rewind, rejuvinate and sleep as late as you can.  Build up and save up for the next go round.

 

Every teacher/friend I've ever known has always loved their job, but also had to work summer jobs.  Never knew any that actually enjoyed their summer.

Fate whispers to her, "You cannot withstand the storm." She whispers back, "I am the storm."

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,840
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!


@Preds wrote:

Enjoy your "Freedom" @Mellie32 .  Rewind, rejuvinate and sleep as late as you can.  Build up and save up for the next go round.

 

Every teacher/friend I've ever known has always loved their job, but also had to work summer jobs.  Never knew any that actually enjoyed their summer.


Wow.  I know many teachers and I can't think of one of them that has a summer job except maybe an extra 4 weeks or so to do summer school.  I have thought about a summer job, but it would just be to have something to do.  I don't really need the money.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,661
Registered: ‎03-23-2010

Re: Freeeeeeeeedom!

Hope you have a great summer!

 

We still have 3 more weeks of school left. 😂