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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,625
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Thanks for the article. I found it informative.

 

Some of these responses ... oy

 

I don't have the energy to debate, but I'm not surprised to see the same misinformation and myopic mindset from the usual posters (the same ones always trashing millennials and younger people for their selfishness).

If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor. ~ Desmond Tutu
Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,716
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@GrailSeeker 

The models were wrong, the scientists and experts were wrong.

 

The amount of government waste is unbelieveable, and the amount of money spent on the field hospitals makes me ill.

 

All based on bad numbers, and we the American public are paying a heavy price.

 

Thank you to your son for his service.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,922
Registered: ‎07-18-2010

@Mom2Dogs wrote:

@GrailSeeker 

The models were wrong, the scientists and experts were wrong.

 

The amount of government waste is unbelieveable, and the amount of money spent on the field hospitals makes me ill.

 

All based on bad numbers, and we the American public are paying a heavy price.

 

Thank you to your son for his service.


The models were right, we actually did FAR better than the folks who did the modeling thought we would.  WE are the reason the outcome has been different not  "bad numbers."

 

That happened where I live, it was a terrible hot spot and wham, we CLOSED UP and all stayed home.  The curve took time but we are now in line with the rest of the state.  But ONLY BECAUSE OF US, NOT BECAUSE THE NUMBERS WERE WRONG.   

 

During a Pandemic with no prior experience we are going to err on the side of safety.  Anyone suggesting we be frugal in a Pandemic has another agenda.  

Contributor
Posts: 66
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Its not hard to figure out that if shelter in place orders had not been in place those field hospitals would definitely been needed.  Just common sense. I don't consider it a waste of money. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,625
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

80,000K+ deaths in what ... 2 months? Model or no model, that is scary as hell. Keep in mind those numbers are WITH quarantines in place. But keep pushing the narrative that it's just like the flu and just some huge gubmint conspiracy or plot to force vaccines on you, or whatever other crazy theory is going around.

If you are neutral in situations of injustice, you have chosen the side of the oppressor. ~ Desmond Tutu
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,232
Registered: ‎06-14-2011

Have always felt that it has now become a matter of each persons slide ruler of fear/risk.  I have a hard time with the 6ft rule. How much time do you allow before that 'air space" is safe? Most masks are not worn correctly let alone sterilized after each use or a new one used. People becoming "enforcers" based on "information" they deem as "law" is way wrong. Everyone is responsible for their own safety.  My daugher had cancer at age 3 it was my responsibility to keep her safe.  She is grown has had lupus for many years, and gave birth to her 3rd child on April 8th.  My son, is a risk taker.  He is deployed in the military overseas.  My husband is a former coal miner and is on the front lines as a regional area manager for a cleaning company for government buildings he's part of a special Covid Response team that sanitizes the buildings after positive testings.  He's comfortable with a level of risk others are not.  There's a problem now with many people running out of $$ and stimulus can't keep being a band-aid.  So it becomes a level of risk and what each individual is comfortable with and learning to live life moving forward with it. Non-essential workers need to provide for their families. Fear mongering needs to stop or soon the desperate and destitues will push back.  They might not have money for masks.  They have hungry children, babies.  The virus isn't going away.  Hiding in your home isn't a solution for eveyone.  Learning to live with it is.  We all have to die. That's life.   This virus is just one more of the trillion ways we die.  It's painful. There are alot of painful ways to die.  With it is a level of risk.  There are risky jobs people do every day.  Who knows what the proper way to open the economy is?  No one.  But it will have to happen.  Period.  If you're afraid, stay away.  Let those who are comfortable with a higher level of risk do the job.  Since unless you were tested every morning you wake up you could have it and be asymtomatic.  You could be spreading.  You could have already had it.  You will never know.  That's just reality.  And part of the biggest fear is "the unknown".   That person feeling they need to get in someones face about a mask may be the one who has it.  And they are yelling at those who don't.  No one will ever know.  That being said, again it comes down to who is a risk taker and who will have to protect their vunerable and who are not risk takers.  It's fine to be any of those. This country was built on risk takers.  Be it physical, ecoonomical or emotional or all three.  And as more people get tested yes it will show more positive cases.  The question then becomes are they asymtomatic?  Did they wind up in the hospital?  Alot of people don't.  It's not an automatic death sentence for many. It really isn't.  Unfortunately for some it is.  Again there is alot other than just this virus out there that is fatal for some.  Back to level of risk.  You need to do what is right for you.  Let everyone do what they are comfortable with.  Yes there are "laws".  But unless you are an LEO then you are not the law.  Reporting those people as "law brakers" because you are frightened and "feel" they are wrong might cause them to lose their job, their ability to provide for their family and let's face it, they just have a higher level of being comfortable with risk that you dont.    You don't know them. You don't know their life. You are only speaking from your fear not theirs.  Hard to accept for some people?  Yes. But we need to take care of ourselves.  Those that actually have the job of taking care of others will do so.  It's a weird wacky world, but it's the one we have been now handed.  Life cannot stop.  Life will find a way.  Just my take on it.  Hope I didn't offend anyone.  Maybe got some people to think, maybe not.  Usually if you are of one mindset and opinion that will not change.  Just hoping if you pull the curtain a little more open you might see a bit more.  :-)  Have a good day everyone and stay within your level of safe. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,488
Registered: ‎04-18-2013

@Lipstickdiva 

 

Please don't "blow" your "stack".

 

It's not worth it.

 

This advice, of course, is coming from someone who may very well blow her stack at some point.

 

Cat Frustrated

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,199
Registered: ‎04-04-2015

Re: Evaluation of Risks

[ Edited ]

@Lipstickdiva wrote:

@pitdakota wrote:
_________________________________________________________

 

@Lipstickdiva, a super spreader is just a loose common term that describes an individual that is responsible for infecting a larger number of people than is expected for a particular infectious disease.   For example, there is a super spreader that wasa guy from the UK, that they traced 11 infections in 3 different countries directly back to him.  He was on business trips while infectious.  All 11 infections traced back directly to him.  The infection rate for this virus as they think now is 2.  So one person infects another 2 people, those 2 people each infect another 2, leading to a total of 7 people very quickly.   Not all 7 may have had any contact with the initial person at all.  A super spreader has direct contact with the individuals infected & is technically called the index patient or individual.

 

 What has been happening in nursing homes is that the virus is being brought in by several different people from the outside and passing it on to the residents.  Then another resident gets it and spreads it to another resident.  So that is not considered a super spreader, per se but is community transmission.   It is problematic because for a period of time, people are contagious without really even knowing anything is wrong with them. 

 

Nursing homes have multiple people working, nursing assistants, LPNs, cleaning staff, managers, social workers, dietary people, etc.  Those individuals bring the virus in, transmits it to someone else, maybe even another resident, then it spreads between residents before they know it.  

 

Many long term care facilities have cut down on recreational activities, no more bingo or community dining but it is still very difficult to keep the residents totally apart.  Plus they are in a confined space with the same ventilation system so the principle is the same as the air that is in a restaurant, or office space, etc.   The reason the  resturant situation is mentioned is because it is a certain instance in which they were able to directly trace the contact and map out the air pattern in the resturant that demonstrated how the people at the other tables became infected.  

 

 

 

 


@pitdakota, thank you very much for the explanation.  


No what happened in the nursing homes in NY was that the State required them to take Covid patients  - even when they clearly said they could not safely isolate them and begged the State to send them to the UNFILLED Mercy ship.  The state refused - consigning innocent people to death from exposure.

 

Let's just stop with the fantasy that if we all just listen to the "experts" and obey the State, everything will be fine - because they "know what's best for us."

 

Clearly, they don't.

Contributor
Posts: 66
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

I don't think anyone expects the shelter in place orders to last much longer.  But things are not going to be the same as they were before. People will be expected to wear mask and some won't, most will. I hope.  

The more people follow the rules the quicker the economy recover.

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,488
Registered: ‎04-18-2013

@bhvbum wrote:

@Mom2Dogs wrote:

@GrailSeeker 

The models were wrong, the scientists and experts were wrong.

 

The amount of government waste is unbelieveable, and the amount of money spent on the field hospitals makes me ill.

 

All based on bad numbers, and we the American public are paying a heavy price.

 

Thank you to your son for his service.


The models were right, we actually did FAR better than the folks who did the modeling thought we would.  WE are the reason the outcome has been different not  "bad numbers."

 

That happened where I live, it was a terrible hot spot and wham, we CLOSED UP and all stayed home.  The curve took time but we are now in line with the rest of the state.  But ONLY BECAUSE OF US, NOT BECAUSE THE NUMBERS WERE WRONG.   

 

During a Pandemic with no prior experience we are going to err on the side of safety.  Anyone suggesting we be frugal in a Pandemic has another agenda.  


Additionally, this is not over yet.  Not by a long shot.

 

Personally, at this point in time, I have to think about personal safety weighed against personal risk.  I don't have the luxury of staying home much longer.  Bills, you know.  

 

And I do consider it a luxury.  Only because it keeps me a whole lot safer than a lot of people who have to be out serving the public every day.