Reply
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

While that may be an interesting study,anyone posting here would only be doing so on conjecture or limited to their personal experiences. 


Why do you say this @CrazyDaisy.


Because everyone will answer this question based upon thier own experience and belief system.  As an example, if you have never met, spoken or gotten to know a person from the Amish community you will have a very different percieption than someone who has.


I see your point.  I was speaking much more broadly than the US though.  I really won't count the US when I discuss this.  The US is not a homogenous society but it can be cloistered.

*Call Tyrone*
Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,752
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

While that may be an interesting study,anyone posting here would only be doing so on conjecture or limited to their personal experiences. 


Why do you say this @CrazyDaisy.


Because everyone will answer this question based upon thier own experience and belief system.  As an example, if you have never met, spoken or gotten to know a person from the Amish community you will have a very different percieption than someone who has.


*****************************

That's not really true, there have been numerous studies on cloistered groups.  These things are studied in Sociology and Anthropology.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 20,550
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

There are some religious societies that are pretty cloistered, even still.  You are only allowed to believe certain things, think a certain way, and consider everybody who doesn't think like you, or believe what you believe, to be the dammed.  

 

Stuff like that leaves a pretty narrow world view.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Preds wrote:

Yes.  Lack of exposure.  Fear of the unknown.


I would disagree, lack of exposure could also foster curiosity.


Yes, but it might have to stop there for some societies.  It would be good if they had the means to travel and/or study other cultures.  However, it's still best to immerse one's self in another culture to understand it.  I believe this because there are so many sub cultures within cultures and it would be hard for them not to generalize.


You do not have to travel and study other cultures to be tolerant and acceptance of differences as the question asked.


@CrazyDaisy. I didn't say that have to travel, I said it would be good if they could.  This way they'd get real world experience as opposed to select information provided by their own sources.  In addition, you'd get to see the differences in each group with all their sub cultures so as to no generalize one group of people.

*Call Tyrone*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,774
Registered: ‎03-20-2010

@Noel7 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

While that may be an interesting study,anyone posting here would only be doing so on conjecture or limited to their personal experiences. 


Why do you say this @CrazyDaisy.


Because everyone will answer this question based upon thier own experience and belief system.  As an example, if you have never met, spoken or gotten to know a person from the Amish community you will have a very different percieption than someone who has.


*****************************

That's not really true, there have been numerous studies on cloistered groups.  These things are studied in Sociology and Anthropology.


Well since the question did not ask for the discussion of specific studies, rather individual answers I stand by my reply.

Someday, when scientists discover the center of the Universe....some people will be disappointed it is not them.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,752
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@chickenbutt wrote:

There are some religious societies that are pretty cloistered, even still.  You are only allowed to believe certain things, think a certain way, and consider everybody who doesn't think like you, or believe what you believe, to be the dammed.  

 

Stuff like that leaves a pretty narrow world view.


************************

 

Hi CB Smiley Happy

 

That's true, and some monks in other countries who begin their training as shildren, living in a temple with others like them.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,504
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@Moonchilde wrote:

I have known and continue to know people who firmly believe that if they haven't personally experienced something, don't have a close friend or family member who has experienced something, or "have never heard" of something - it simply doesn't exist, isn't true, cannot be and anyone who insists otherwise exaggerates, is a liar, stupid, etc., etc.

 

I have never seen a common denominator among them as to worldliness or lack thereof, insulation in a "community" or anything like that. In fact I'd say more the opposite in my personal experience - IMO it's often people who should "know better" as they *have* been exposed to a variety of peoples, situations and viewpoints.


What you describe is choice.  No hindrances to knowledge of other cultures.  


 

 

The OP asks:  

Do you think people that grew up in or live socially cloistered lives tend to be more inflexible in their thinking, tolerance and acceptance of differences than those from more diverse communities?

For the purpose of this discussion "socially cloistered" means an environment where nearly everyone has the same background and exposures that would limit how they see society beyond their individual experiences (i.e., I've never seen/heard that, who would think that way, that can't be true).

::::::::::::

 

My response was that I don't believe being socially cloistered is the only, or even a major, deciding factor in intolerance. It *might* be, and sometimes is, but my own experience has been that the most UNcloistered have the capacity to be just as intolerant as anyone else.

 

CAN the socially isolated be intolerant? Yes.

Are ONLY the socially isolated intolerant? No.

Once socially isolated, always socially isolated, ever unchanging in outlook and POV? Perhaps, but not necessarily. It's not a given.

Life without Mexican food is no life at all
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,069
Registered: ‎05-27-2016

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

While that may be an interesting study,anyone posting here would only be doing so on conjecture or limited to their personal experiences. 


Why do you say this @CrazyDaisy.


Because everyone will answer this question based upon thier own experience and belief system.  As an example, if you have never met, spoken or gotten to know a person from the Amish community you will have a very different percieption than someone who has.


*****************************

That's not really true, there have been numerous studies on cloistered groups.  These things are studied in Sociology and Anthropology.


Well since the question did not ask for the discussion of specific studies, rather individual answers I stand by my reply.


Yeah but @CrazyDaisy, the studies had outcomes.  We're discussing those outcomes.

*Call Tyrone*
Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,752
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@Noel7 wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

@itiswhatitis wrote:

@CrazyDaisy wrote:

While that may be an interesting study,anyone posting here would only be doing so on conjecture or limited to their personal experiences. 


Why do you say this @CrazyDaisy.


Because everyone will answer this question based upon thier own experience and belief system.  As an example, if you have never met, spoken or gotten to know a person from the Amish community you will have a very different percieption than someone who has.


*****************************

That's not really true, there have been numerous studies on cloistered groups.  These things are studied in Sociology and Anthropology.


Well since the question did not ask for the discussion of specific studies, rather individual answers I stand by my reply.


*****************************

 

You can't assume everyone bases their opinion on their own experience/belief system.  Some study for years or have traveled and experienced contact with different groups.

 

Anyone can go to the library and pick up a book about any subject and expand their knowledge. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 19,984
Registered: ‎08-08-2010

@Kitlynn wrote:

I grew up in a small rural area where the main livihood was farming and ranching. We didn't have any African Americans living in our town. And only a couple of Mexican families. It was really a pretty much all Caucasion community. I was a Sophomore in high school before I actually saw an African American and that was at a nearby college. Now my parents raised us to not judge any one by the color of their skin, religious beliefs, political affliations or their sexual preferences. They told us that everyone is created by God and that all we should judge anyone on is how they treat us. Now I have to say to this day I think that was great advice and it has served me well. When I grew up and moved to a city I never gave a thought to any of these things. I just saw and still do see all of us as human beings and I feel like there is good and bad in every race. So I think it has less to do with where you are raised and live and more to do with how you were raised.


 

I have to say I don't agree with most of the answers posted here. But this answer is what I have seen over and over again, in my personal experiences.

 

I was raised in public schools, and not at all 'cloistered' but have a sister in law (and have know many others that were in the same situations) that were raised 'cloistered'.

 

They had no prejudices because they had never been exposed to people 'different' from themselves. Our prejudices and judgements often come from experience with people different from us and it not being a positive experience, when we are younger. They simply believed that people were all basically the same and basically good, because they had no exposure, especially negative, with others different from them.

 

It took them years to become jaded by bad experiences once they were exposed to people different than themselves.