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Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,997
Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

[ Edited ]

I've been trying to get a message to my GP (who's been on vacation for weeks).  I finally got to talk to her assistant yesterday.  My issue is she still has "hypertension" listed on my chart as one of my ailments.  I no longer have hypertension, as the only reason I was getting high blood pressure readings were because I was on ibuprofen every day for RA pain.  Long term use of ibuprofen has the side effect of HBP.

 

Two doctors, a gastro doc and this GP both put me on medication for HBP without thinking of taking me off ibuprofen.  I had to find out myself by researching.  Once I stopped taking ibuprofen, my BP went back to normal and slightly low, as our family has always has had.  I advised my GP of this fact and she simply shrugged it off and said to stop taking the blood pressure med (which I had already done).

 

However, I noted that "hypertension" is still listed on my chart as one of my health issues.  I want it taken off as I do not have it.  The assistant told me I will have to go to court to have it taken off.  That once diagnosed with something, it has to stay on one's chart whether it is valid or not.

 

I am seeing my gastro doc at the end of the month as I am overdue for an endoscopy that he would not perform when he took my BP two years ago and gave me the first scrip of BP med.  Obviously he is going to see that still listed on my chart.  I am not sure what he will do even if he takes my BP at that visit and finds it normal. 

 

Have any of you ever heard of this?  Having to go to court to have an invalid diagnosis removed from your chart?

 

 

 

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986
Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

[ Edited ]

First of all - high blood pressure is not a side effect of ibuprofen. It can cause renal failure, which would then result in high BP but there would be worse things like your labs would show a high BUN and Creatnine first.

Second , you are making a mountain out of a molehill.Just mention to the GI doctor and he can write that it has been resolved.

I am certain one of the worst things to ever happen to doctors has been the "patient portals" where people who don't have a clue what they are reading get on there and then are calling the docs offices over & over to get things changed or because they don't understand what they are reading. Is this the reason you urgently had to discuss something with your doctor in another post? Do you honestly think this is urgent?

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,668
Registered: ‎06-15-2015

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

I  hope that is also not the reason.

preds 06-21-20
"Always be thankful andyou'll have more than you know."
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,140
Registered: ‎03-16-2010

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

Oh I agree this is important. We are approaching a medical records system in which many docs will be particiapting in our care and this permanent records must be up to date and accurate. Wait until you can talk to PCP but be firm about your record being up to date. 

 

My PCP put a diagnosis on my chart. After seeing a specialist the suspected diagnosis was not confirmed but it is still on my record. So frustrating. 

 

On another note, for those of you that have a PCP that use patient portals be sure and go on and read your clinic notes. I was surprised that casual talk I said made it to my permanent chart. Some notes I think were taken out of context and misreprsented. Not real critical stuff but none the less interesting. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,997
Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@granddi wrote:

Oh I agree this is important. We are approaching a medical records system in which many docs will be particiapting in our care and this permanent records must be up to date and accurate. Wait until you can talk to PCP but be firm about your record being up to date. 

 

My PCP put a diagnosis on my chart. After seeing a specialist the suspected diagnosis was not confirmed but it is still on my record. So frustrating. 

 

On another note, for those of you that have a PCP that use patient portals be sure and go on and read your clinic notes. I was surprised that casual talk I said made it to my permanent chart. Some notes I think were taken out of context and misreprsented. Not real critical stuff but none the less interesting. 


Unfortunately I have a stomach condition for which I've been having endoscopies every six months for five years.  I am way overdue.  My appointment is at the end of the month to see the gastro doc, and then an appointment should be made for the endo.  So it is important that this issue be straightened out.

 

Thank you for your agreement that our medical records must be accurate.  There are times when patients are unable to voice the existence of inaccuracies.

 

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986
Valued Contributor
Posts: 1,391
Registered: ‎09-30-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

I found this website about the effects of IB.  Hope it helps.

 

http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/medications-cause

 

IMO, medical issues that are not correct should be removed from our records and one should not have to take it to court for removal.  That's ludicrous when the physician has the capability to remove it.  I have had the same issue with something myself and it seems to take "an act of congress" to have it removed. 

 

I am very careful how much IB I take because of the side effects.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,997
Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@HisElk wrote:

I found this website about the effects of IB.  Hope it helps.

 

http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/medications-cause

 

IMO, medical issues that are not correct should be removed from our records and one should not have to take it to court for removal.  That's ludicrous when the physician has the capability to remove it.  I have had the same issue with something myself and it seems to take "an act of congress" to have it removed. 

 

I am very careful how much IB I take because of the side effects.


I take no painkillers anymore, HisElk.  And never IB anymore or any other kind of OTC painkiller (or prescription either, for that matter).  Rarely I will take an Aleve when I get one of my nighttime headaches.

 

Thanks for the article, I will read it now.  I did a lot of google searching also and they all said long term ibuprofen use will cause and/or aggravate HBP, which I already knew because I had done it before.

 

Plus facts are facts.  When I stopped taking it, my BP went back to normal.

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986
Valued Contributor
Posts: 1,391
Registered: ‎09-30-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@LilacTree wrote:

 


@HisElk wrote:

I found this website about the effects of IB.  Hope it helps.

 

http://www.webmd.com/hypertension-high-blood-pressure/guide/medications-cause

 

IMO, medical issues that are not correct should be removed from our records and one should not have to take it to court for removal.  That's ludicrous when the physician has the capability to remove it.  I have had the same issue with something myself and it seems to take "an act of congress" to have it removed. 

 

I am very careful how much IB I take because of the side effects.


I take no painkillers anymore, HisElk.  And never IB anymore or any other kind of OTC painkiller (or prescription either, for that matter).  Rarely I will take an Aleve when I get one of my nighttime headaches.

 

Thanks for the article, I will read it now.  I did a lot of google searching also and they all said long term ibuprofen use will cause and/or aggravate HBP, which I already knew because I had done it before.

 

Plus facts are facts.  When I stopped taking it, my BP went back to normal.


Hey Lilac Tree, glad you saw my post.  Rarely do I take any unless I really need them. 

 

As far as the article, it's pretty clear and there are also many other sites I found by googling.  Smiley Happy

Valued Contributor
Posts: 767
Registered: ‎07-12-2010

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

[ Edited ]

You're likely a person who, for whatever reasons, should probably only take an acetaminophen (Tylenol). Just don't O.D. on it - too easy to do with Tylenol.

 

Many doctors already tend to direct patients to use Tylenol as ibuprobens (Advil, etc) can aggravate blood pressure levels.

 

And you may be sensitive to ibuprofens or may have been taking more than you might have even realized.

 

Realistically, no one should be taking any of these over-the-counter drugs day in and day out for years. Often if pain gets to be that bad or chronic, a good doctor might turn to some other, more effective medication.

 

You're probably prone to hypertension. It might be why you were diagonsed with such. Is something to which you are probably easily susceptible (and not just at that visit when it was written up).

 

Millions of American suffer various degrees of hypertension. Its actually maybe a GOOD thing it was diagonsed as most people walk around not even knowing they have it till they have major problems.

 

And even if you don't have hypertenion other than when using certain meds, it might be good to keep the record of such meds having such an effect on you on file.

 

You would not want it removed...to then have some problem later on in which everyone wonders why that diagnosis had never previously been detected.

 

Its all about your HEALTH in the end. Don't worry so much about past doctors visits which were documenting something in order to be "better safe than sorry".

 

If you're worried about insurances, most don't use that as points against you so long as its being treated or its proven to have been truly, lastingly resolved. Its when a person doesn't know or isn't being treated (even keeping an eye out for it is treated in a sense) that sends up the red flag to most insurances.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,997
Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

Thanks surfk, good information.  Insurance isn't an issue with me, I'm old and on Medicare.

 


@surfk wrote:

You're likely a person who, for whatever reasons, should probably only take an acetaminophen (Tylenol). Just don't O.D. on it - too easy to do with Tylenol.

 

Many doctors already tend to direct patients to use Tylenol as ibuprobins (Advil, etc) can aggravate blood pressure levels.

 

And you may be sensitive to ibuprofens or may have been taking more than you might have even realized.

 

Realistically, no one should be taking any of these over-the-counter drugs day in and day out for years. Often if pain gets to be that bad or chronic, a good doctor might turn to some other, more effective medication.

 

You're probably prone to hypertension. It might be why you were diagonsed with such. Is something to which you are probably easily susceptible (and not just at that visit when it was written up).

 

Millions of American suffer various degrees of hypertension. Its actually maybe a GOOD thing it was diagonsed as most people walk around not even knowing they have it till they have major problems.

 

And even if you don't have hypertenion other than when using certain meds, it might be good to keep the record of such meds having such an effect on you on file.

 

You would not want it removed...to then have some problem later on in which everyone wonders why that diagnosis had never previously been detected.

 

Its all about your HEALTH in the end. Don't worry so much about past doctors visits which were documenting something in order to be "better safe than sorry".

 

If you're worried about insurances, most don't use that as points against you so long as its being treated or its proven to have been truly, lastingly resolved. Its when a person doesn't know or isn't being treated (even keeping an eye out for it is treated in a sense) that sends up the red flag to most insurances.


 

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986