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Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,997
Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@granddi wrote:

I don't think anyone is suggesting that medical records be altered but we are saying they should be acurate as to current conditions,current medications and past history. 

 

I was given metroprol for "rapid pulse rate" I have never had hypertension. Now I go to the pharmacist for the behind the counter cold med and the tech says "you cannot take this bc you have HBP. I said I do not have HBP and she is just not going to take my word for knowing my health. Someone said that patients should not be reading health records bc we don't know what we are reading. I disagree.

 

Now I go in for a little out pt procedure and the intake nurse says why to you take metroprol and I said rapid pulse rate. She records IRREGULAR heart rate. Now this is on my records!!!!

 

Medical records are also legal documents and all parties should and must do everything possible to make them complete and accurate. Inaccurate medical records can cause harm to patients.

 

 


This report was given to me by the doc at the end of the visit.  From now on I will be getting an updated report every time I see her.  Obviously, I read it, and understood it. 

 

I will talk to her about adding an addendum or a note of some kind that will explain the reason for the HBP diagnosis (ibuprofen) and that I no longer have hypertension.

 

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,575
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@granddi wrote:

I don't think anyone is suggesting that medical records be altered but we are saying they should be acurate as to current conditions,current medications and past history. 

 

I was given metroprol for "rapid pulse rate" I have never had hypertension. Now I go to the pharmacist for the behind the counter cold med and the tech says "you cannot take this bc you have HBP. I said I do not have HBP and she is just not going to take my word for knowing my health. Someone said that patients should not be reading health records bc we don't know what we are reading. I disagree.

 

Now I go in for a little out pt procedure and the intake nurse says why to you take metroprol and I said rapid pulse rate. She records IRREGULAR heart rate. Now this is on my records!!!!

 

Medical records are also legal documents and all parties should and must do everything possible to make them complete and accurate. Inaccurate medical records can cause harm to patients.

 

 


If they want something removed, they certainly would be altering a medical record. I totally agree with you, it should be accurate and statements can be made to that effect in the record if something is not accurate.  Talk with the office manager or make sure your provider is aware of what is wrong - he can document to that effect.

 

I take the same med you do for a fast heart rate (tachycardia) that I developed during chemo and it is NOT the same as an irregular heartbeat - sometimes I wonder where these nurses went to school.  I work in the medical profession and sometimes the hardest thing to deal with is to get the nurses to understand that the medical record has to be accurate and complete.  I know they are busy, but that is so important and sometimes it makes adifference wether the insurance company will pay.  I have encountered this situation many times.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,997
Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@HisElk wrote:

@Maysee wrote:
Indeed, Ibuprofen is a medication that can elevate BP. I am a nurse.

Thank you.  There was some misinformation posted earlier in the thread about this.  That is why I gave the site proving that it can.

 

I appreciate your post. Smiley Happy


I also appreciate both of your posts.  I do not give credence to the previous post that it does not. 

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,960
Registered: ‎11-15-2011

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

Every time I go to my PCP they ask if my meds are correct.  Any Doctor should do this for a new patient.  You should have a chance to explain each condition.  I do this without a problem.  Hopefully, you will be able to also. 

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,279
Registered: ‎05-15-2010

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@LilacTree wrote:

I've been trying to get a message to my GP (who's been on vacation for weeks).  I finally got to talk to her assistant yesterday.  My issue is she still has "hypertension" listed on my chart as one of my ailments.  I no longer have hypertension, as the only reason I was getting high blood pressure readings were because I was on ibuprofen every day for RA pain.  Long term use of ibuprofen has the side effect of HBP.

 

Two doctors, a gastro doc and this GP both put me on medication for HBP without thinking of taking me off ibuprofen.  I had to find out myself by researching.  Once I stopped taking ibuprofen, my BP went back to normal and slightly low, as our family has always has had.  I advised my GP of this fact and she simply shrugged it off and said to stop taking the blood pressure med (which I had already done).

 

However, I noted that "hypertension" is still listed on my chart as one of my health issues.  I want it taken off as I do not have it.  The assistant told me I will have to go to court to have it taken off.  That once diagnosed with something, it has to stay on one's chart whether it is valid or not.

 

I am seeing my gastro doc at the end of the month as I am overdue for an endoscopy that he would not perform when he took my BP two years ago and gave me the first scrip of BP med.  Obviously he is going to see that still listed on my chart.  I am not sure what he will do even if he takes my BP at that visit and finds it normal. 

 

Have any of you ever heard of this?  Having to go to court to have an invalid diagnosis removed from your chart?

 

 

Lilac, one thing that you can do now is compose a letter to the doctor explaining your complaint and insist that she put it in your chart.


 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,997
Registered: ‎03-25-2012

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact


@Big Sister wrote:

@LilacTree wrote:

I've been trying to get a message to my GP (who's been on vacation for weeks).  I finally got to talk to her assistant yesterday.  My issue is she still has "hypertension" listed on my chart as one of my ailments.  I no longer have hypertension, as the only reason I was getting high blood pressure readings were because I was on ibuprofen every day for RA pain.  Long term use of ibuprofen has the side effect of HBP.

 

Two doctors, a gastro doc and this GP both put me on medication for HBP without thinking of taking me off ibuprofen.  I had to find out myself by researching.  Once I stopped taking ibuprofen, my BP went back to normal and slightly low, as our family has always has had.  I advised my GP of this fact and she simply shrugged it off and said to stop taking the blood pressure med (which I had already done).

 

However, I noted that "hypertension" is still listed on my chart as one of my health issues.  I want it taken off as I do not have it.  The assistant told me I will have to go to court to have it taken off.  That once diagnosed with something, it has to stay on one's chart whether it is valid or not.

 

I am seeing my gastro doc at the end of the month as I am overdue for an endoscopy that he would not perform when he took my BP two years ago and gave me the first scrip of BP med.  Obviously he is going to see that still listed on my chart.  I am not sure what he will do even if he takes my BP at that visit and finds it normal. 

 

Have any of you ever heard of this?  Having to go to court to have an invalid diagnosis removed from your chart?

 

 

Lilac, one thing that you can do now is compose a letter to the doctor explaining your complaint and insist that she put it in your chart.


 

That is a very good idea.  She doesn't accept emails (she is such a prima donna), so a letter would be the next best thing.  Thanks!!


 

Formerly Ford1224
We must always take sides. Neutrality helps the oppressor, never the victim. Silence encourages the tormentor, never the tormented. Elie Wiesel 1986
Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,766
Registered: ‎07-02-2015

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

[ Edited ]

The following is only part of a story published in today's Washington Post about new FDA warnings about the risks of ibuprofen and similar NSAID drugs, in relation to blood pressure and heart attacks.

 

(Visit washingtonpost.com, do a keyword search for ibuprofen and heart attack, to see the entire story.)

__________________________________

 

The Food and Drug Administration on Thursday strengthened safety warnings on widely used over-the-counter and prescription painkillers, such as ibuprofen and naproxen, letting consumers know that these medications can increase people's chances of a heart attack or stroke.

Here are some answers to frequently asked questions about the change:

Which drugs are effected?

The label changes will be made on nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), a group of medications used for temporary relief of pain and inflammation. These include common brands, such as Advil and Motrin (ibuprofen) and Aleve (naproxen), that are used to treat everything from temporary fever and backaches to more chronic conditions like arthritis. NSAIDs are also often used as a component of multi-symptom cold medicines so check the list of active ingredients carefully.

Wait -- I just looked at my bottle, and there's already a warning there. What's new here?

The FDA first put a boxed warning on NSAIDs in 2005 after Vioxx was pulled off the market for links to heart attack and stroke. The wording will now be changed to "may cause" problems, such as heart attack and strokes, to "cause." The language already on boxes advises patients to take the lowest possible dose for the least amount of time up to 10 days, and this will remain the same.

What prompted the update?

Since 2011, a number of studies published in respected journals, such as the BMJ and The Lancet, have linked long-term, high-dose use with greater risk for heart attack, stroke, heart failure and death from cardiovascular causes. But more recent studies have shown the risk of heart attack or stroke can increase even if people use NSAIDs only for a short time and within the first weeks of use.

This sounds serious. I already have a heart condition. What should I do?

Those who have had a heart attack or cardiac bypass surgery are at the most risk. The FDA suggests that people with cardiovascular disease.....[the newspaper's website makes it hard to nicely copy an entire story, so this is cut off before the end of the story...sorry about that]

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,779
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Your medical records (chart) . . . surprising fact

Ibuprofen can cause your blood pressure to rise. It does mine. I can take it for about 3 days in a row & it helps with pain & makes me sleep. After that time if I keep taking it my BP goes up, my heart's beating too fast & I cannot sleep. I have seen Hyperthroid listed in some of my records & I'm actually Hypothyroid. Big difference.