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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,202
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

I had to call 911 last week on dh. He was in the hospital for a few days and released with oxygen. I think he should have gone to a convalescent hospital to get better. I have to nag him to take his medicine and use his devices that he has to blow into. And it is not working so good--the nagging. He isn't trying. Nurses are coming today to evaluate him. Last week one said if he isn't trying she can't come back. His feet are so swollen. A couple years ago he also was in the hospital but wasn't interested in walking even up and down the driveway. He is almost 80.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,059
Registered: ‎12-05-2012

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

He will probably need diuretics and perhaps mediction to help his heart pump better.

They will help the feet, too. Keep his legs elevated if you can. There are also compression stocking that can help move it.

 

I am not a medical person just my experience with my mother.

I hope he gets relief soon.

Best of luck.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

There are many reasons why a person may have fluid in their lungs - one is congestive heart failure - one is pneumonia - another is cancers - and there are many others. Since the OP did not share why there is fluid in his lungs there isn't much to say about what can be done to relieve it.  It sounds like he isn't making any effort to hel[p himself though.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,144
Registered: ‎09-01-2010

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

Based on previous posts about your husband's health, it sounds like he has congestive heart failure.  I have known people who lived 10+ years after their diagnosis, but due to advanced COPD, and weakened lungs, my MIL lived 2 weeks after her diagnosis.   

 

If your husband wants to live, he needs to get out of the bed, and start moving.  If he does not, he will essentially drown in the fluid that builds inside his lungs.   

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,580
Registered: ‎06-15-2015

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

 

I had Aspiration Pneumonia (water in the lungs) with my 1st heart. That put me closer to death than the heart attack. I was in ICU for 8 days, 4 of which I could not move my legs. The The doctors had inserted a Balloon Pump in a Major Artery in my groin to help my heart do less work.

 

If I moved my leg I risked the pump moving in the artery, and me possibly bleeding to death. During those 4 days I also could have NO FLUIDS, period. The ICU nurse would run a semi-wet sponge type of thing around my mouth 4 times a day. I also had to wear a Full Face oxygen mask for all 8 days in ICU. 

 

A Respiratory Therapist would come in every 6 hours to give me a Nebulizer Treatment. I also had what was called "a Motivator", which I was told to use as often as I could stand it to help my lung volume and also help dissipate the fluid in both lungs.

 

Almost 3 weeks in the hospital with this very dangerous issues. I had to give myself the Nebulizer Treatments at home 3 times a day, and had to sleep using an Oxygen Concentrator Mask. Went to 16 Pulmonary Rehab Classes and 36 Cardiac Rehab Classes also.

 

It took me over a year to get that fluid out of my lungs, along with a lot of work using "The Motivator", which I to thus day, still use. That is a short summary of my personal experience with "Water in my Lungs", in my case Aspiration Pneumonia.

 

 

hckynut(john)

 

hckynut(john)
Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,251
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

@hckynutjohn

 

That must have been horrible!  It sounds horrible.  If I may ask -- what is a "motivator"?  My husband has a lot of lung problems and all of this hits home for me.  Man, you certainly have been through a lot.  

"A day without sunshine is like, you know, night." - Steve Martin
Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,251
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

@halfpint1

 

I cannot offer any help but I just want to say how sorry I am for all of your troubles.  

 

It is so frustrating when someone you love has a serious illness and they need to put some effort into their recovery and they just don't seem to want to.

 

I wish you both all the best and I sincerely hope that he has a full recovery. 

"A day without sunshine is like, you know, night." - Steve Martin
Regular Contributor
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎04-30-2010

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

I really dislike the phrase "water in the lungs" or "fluid around the heart".  They do not indicate what the problem actually is.  It is not an accurate diagnosis.  It could mean anything from pericarditis to congestive heart failure or pulmonary edema.  Ask the Dr. what the medical diagnosis is and then you can investigate on your own if you wish.  Sometimes patients just are not motivated and it is difficult.  Remember too with all the new medicare rules patients are in and out of the hospital as quickly as possible to save money.  So don't blame the hospital or Dr.  Their hands are tied in alot of cases.  

Regular Contributor
Posts: 244
Registered: ‎04-30-2010

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

I really dislike the phrase "water in the lungs" or "fluid around the heart".  They do not indicate what the problem actually is.  It is not an accurate diagnosis.  It could mean anything from pericarditis to congestive heart failure or pulmonary edema.  Ask the Dr. what the medical diagnosis is and then you can investigate on your own if you wish.  Sometimes patients just are not motivated and it is difficult.  Remember too with all the new medicare rules patients are in and out of the hospital as quickly as possible to save money.  So don't blame the hospital or Dr.  Their hands are tied in alot of cases.  You should have been given a notice of discharge in the hospital and you can indicate that you feel the patient is not ready.  They must respond to your concerns

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,580
Registered: ‎06-15-2015

Re: Water in the lungs--know anyone and how they are treated

AngelPuppy1 wrote:

@hckynutjohn

 

That must have been horrible!  It sounds horrible.  If I may ask -- what is a "motivator"?  My husband has a lot of lung problems and all of this hits home for me.  Man, you certainly have been through a lot.  



Hi AngelPuppy1,

 

What I have used is called a Spirometer. The brand I have is AirLife. They are not expensive to buy, but I got my 2 from different times in the hospital with my 2 heart attacks. They are part of what they give you for recovery.

 

I posted this some time back for another person that asked about it. I think back then they cost less than $10. This device works by the user inhaling. You put a mouth shaped plastic tube in your mouth, lips pursed to for a tight seal, and then inhale.

 

It has numbers on the sides to show you certain levels, and you work to get them higher. When you inhale, a ball inside the tube goes up, from there some doctors set up certain goals for their patient to work towards.

 

I will tell you that when I had my Aspiration Pneumonia, doing this really made my lungs burn(hurt). But that is part of getting better sooner and also for helping maintain the better and more efficient function of the lungs.

 

I know when I got out of ICU, my roommate was also supposed to be using one for his issues. He never used it and I asked him why. He told me it made his chest hurt and might give him another heart attack. We were both hooked up to 24/7 heart monitors and I told him not to worry about it. Never did get him to use it.

 

Anyways, try a Google of AirLife Spirometer and see what you can find. I think the hospital named them "The Motivator" to incentive their patients.

 

Let me know if you have any more questions. Maybe this is something that might help your husband, but it is always best to check with his doctor first. Has he been seeing a Pulmonologist for his lung issues?

 

 

 

hckynut(john)

hckynut(john)