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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,549
Registered: ‎03-17-2010

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.


@151949 wrote:

IMO - the consumption and enjoyment of food is one of the gifts God gave us on this earth and to completely take away that joy is a sin. To make someone feel like they have to feel guilty for eating a reasonably normal amount of food - for instance one cup of soup - should not be how our medical community deals with this disease.

I learned a lot during the other days of this class but I found the dietary part to be just totally unreasonable.


When I had my class roughly 8 - 9 years ago the kind of diet you've outlined here was not even brought up.  My gosh, that's all I would be doing is scrounging around for tiny bits of food to eat all day long....

 

I usually have one slice of toast in the morning with 1/2 teaspoon of peanut butter on it  and coffee and water.

 

Lunch is my biggest meal (like a dinner to most) and differs daily.  Today I will be having 6oz of sirloin, sauteed mushrooms, a salad (dressing on the side) with water.

 

I snack on mixed nuts (no salt) whenever I feel hungry... almonds and walnuts are my favorites but will eat any nut....

 

Dinner is one (larger) cup of soup with no noodles (or if they are in there, I don't eat them).  I prefer broth type soups personally but have had Progresso LIght Cream soups and I have three whole wheat crackers and water.

 

I occasionally have a 1" x 1" little piece of cheeze with the cracker as well....

 

I think that after trial and error (and your trusty BS Meter) you'll find which foods give you the lowest glycemic load and which are highest (I can't eat pasta at all.... and also potato).... again, everyone is different,  but I would balk at "grazing" all day too.....

*~"Never eat more than you can lift......" Miss Piggy~*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,549
Registered: ‎03-17-2010

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.

The toast I mention in my above post is a multi-grain bread with no sugar or corn syrup in it....

*~"Never eat more than you can lift......" Miss Piggy~*
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,336
Registered: ‎11-15-2011

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.

[ Edited ]

I've taken a class also when my DH was diagnosed as diabetic.  Nothing like the information the OP is posting. 

 

Not 1/2 cup soup, enough soup to equal to one meal.  50 gm carbs, etc. based on (150gm of carbs/day, 50gm of fats, 1500mg of salt (less than a tsp) and try to get some fiber in as much as you can).  We often found the amount of food was more than we were used to eating.  Weight was not a problem for either of us.

 

A little knowledge, some imagination and drama = what I think is interesting to post!  No necessarily the facts!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,262
Registered: ‎07-02-2015

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.

[ Edited ]

Info below is published online by the University of Maryland Medical Center and  might be of interest to diabetics........especially those who like beer!...

_______________

 

Brewer's yeast

Overview

Brewer's yeast is made from a one-celled fungus called Saccharomyces cerevisiae and is used to make beer. It has been grown and used as a nutritional supplement for years. Brewer's yeast is a rich source of minerals -- particularly selenium; protein; B-complex vitamins, and chromium, an essential trace mineral that helps the body maintain normal blood sugar levels.

Brewer's yeast tastes bitter and should not be confused with baker's yeast, nutritional yeast, or torula yeast. All those types of yeast are low in chromium.

General

The B-complex vitamins in brewer's yeast include B1 (thiamine), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B5 (pantothenic acid), B6 (pyridoxine), B9 (folic acid), and H or B7 (biotin). These vitamins help break down carbohydrates, fats, and proteins, which provide the body with energy. They also support the nervous system, help maintain the muscles used for digestion, and keep skin, hair, eyes, mouth, and liver healthy.

Brewer's yeast does not contain vitamin B12, an essential vitamin found in meat and dairy products.  (take notes, all you plant people)

Diabetes

Some studies suggest that chromium supplements may help people with diabetes control blood sugar levels. People with diabetes either do not produce enough insulin -- a hormone needed to change sugar, starches and other food into energy -- or cannot use the insulin that their bodies make. Chromium may lower blood sugar levels as well, improving glucose tolerance and reducing the amount of insulin needed. Because brewer's yeast is a rich source of chromium, scientists think it may help treat high blood sugar.

High Cholesterol

A few studies suggest that brewer's yeast may help lower LDL ("bad") cholesterol levels in the blood and raise HDL ("good") cholesterol levels. Researchers aren't sure whether that is due to the chromium in brewer's yeast or another substance. Not all studies have found positive results.

Weight Loss

Although some studies suggest that chromium may help reduce body fat, the amount of fat lost is small compared to what can be lost with exercise and a well-balanced diet. Brewer's yeast is also used as a protein supplement and energy booster. So it may help maintain a healthy weight.

Other Uses

At least one study has found that brewer's yeast may improve acne. Another linked it to a reduced risk of a second skin cancer. One large, preliminary study found that taking a specific kind brewer's yeast product (EpiCor) may help prevent colds and flu.

Available Forms

Brewer's yeast is available in powder, flakes, tablet, and liquid forms.

How to Take It

Pediatric

Brewer's yeast is not recommended for use in children, because it hasn't been studied.

Adult

One to two tbsp per day; may be added to food or dissolved in juice or water.

Precautions

Supplements may have side effects or interact with medications. You should take them only under the supervision of your doctor.

Side effects from brewer's yeast are generally mild and may include gas.

People who have frequent yeast infections or who are allergic to yeast should avoid brewer's yeast.

People with diabetes should talk to their doctors before taking brewer's yeast because it could interact with medications for diabetes and cause low blood sugar.

People with Crohn's disease should also talk to their doctors before taking brewer's yeast.

Possible Interactions

If you are being treated with any of the following medications, you should not use brewer's yeast without first talking to your doctor.

Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors (MAOIs) -- Brewer's yeast contains a large amount of tyramine, a substance that can interact with MAOIs and cause a hypertensive crisis. A hypertensive crisis is a very fast and dangerous rise in blood pressure that can cause heart attack or stroke. MAOIs are used to treat depression and include:

  • Phenelzine (Nardil)
  • Tranylcypromine (Parnate)
  • Selegiline (Ensam, Eldepryl)
  • Isocarboxazid (Marplan)

Meperidine (Demerol) -- As with MAOI antidepressants, brewer's yeast may also lead to a high blood pressure crisis if it is taken with Demerol, a narcotic medication used to relieve pain.

Medications for Diabetes -- Brewer's yeast may lower blood sugar levels. When combined with diabetes medications, taking brewer's yeast could raise the risk of having low blood sugar. If you take medications for diabetes, talk to your doctor before taking brewer's yeast.

Supporting Research

Anderson RA. Effects of chromium on body composition and weight loss. Nutr Rev. 1998;56(9):266-270.

Anderson RA. Chromium, glucose intolerance and diabetes. J Amer Coll Nutr. 1998;17:548-555.

Anderson RA. Chromium in the prevention and control of diabetes. Diabetes Metab. 2000; 26:22-27.

Anderson RA. Elevated intake of supplemental chromium improved glucose and insulin variables in individuals with type 2 diabetes. Diabetes. 1997;46:1786-1791.

Bentley JP, Hunt TK, Weiss JB, et al. Peptides from live yeast cell derivative stimulate wound healing. Arch Surg. 1990;125:641-646.

Hegoczki J, Suhajda A, Janzso B, Vereczkey G. Preparation of chromium enriched yeasts. Acta Alimentaria. 1997;26:345-358.

Hosseinzadeh P, Djazayery A, Mostafavi SA, et al. Brewer's Yeast Improves Blood Pressure in Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus. Iran J Public Health. 2013; 42(6):602-609.

Kirschmann GJ, Kirschmann JD, eds. Nutrition Almanac. 4th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill;1996:382.

Li Y-C. Effects of brewer's yeast on glucose tolerance and serum lipids in Chinese adults. Biol Trace Elem Res. 1994;41:341-347.

Moyad MA. Brewer's/baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and preventive medicine: Part I. Urol Nurs. 2007;27(6):560-561.

Moyad MA. Brewer's/baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) and preventive medicine: Part II. Urol Nurs. 2008;28(1):73-75.

Moyad MA, Robinson LE, Zawada ET Jr, et al. Effects of a modified yeast supplement on cold/flu symptoms. Urol Nurs. 2008 Feb;28(1):50-55.

Porter D, Raymond LW, Anastasio GD. Chromium: friend or foe? Arch Fam Med. 1999;8:386-390.

Rabinowitz MB, Gonick HC, Levin SR, Davidson MB. Effects of chromium and yeast supplements on carbohydrate and lipid metabolism in diabetic men. Diabetes Care. 1983;6:319-327.

Rakel D. Rakel Integrative Medicine, 3rd ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier;2012;73.

Yoshida Y, Yokoi W, Wada Y, Ohishi K, Ito M, Sawada H. Potent hypocholesterolemic activity of the yeast Kluyveromyces marxianus YIT 8292 in rats fed a high cholesterol diet. Biosci Biotechnol Biochem. 2004 Jun;68(6):1185-1192.

Version Info

  • Last reviewed on 6/26/2014
  • Steven D. Ehrlich, NMD, Solutions Acupuncture, a private practice specializing in complementary and alternative medicine, Phoenix, AZ. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. Also reviewed by the A.D.A.M. Editorial team.

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.


@Q4U wrote:

@151949 wrote:

IMO - the consumption and enjoyment of food is one of the gifts God gave us on this earth and to completely take away that joy is a sin. To make someone feel like they have to feel guilty for eating a reasonably normal amount of food - for instance one cup of soup - should not be how our medical community deals with this disease.

I learned a lot during the other days of this class but I found the dietary part to be just totally unreasonable.


When I had my class roughly 8 - 9 years ago the kind of diet you've outlined here was not even brought up.  My gosh, that's all I would be doing is scrounging around for tiny bits of food to eat all day long....

 

I usually have one slice of toast in the morning with 1/2 teaspoon of peanut butter on it  and coffee and water.

 

Lunch is my biggest meal (like a dinner to most) and differs daily.  Today I will be having 6oz of sirloin, sauteed mushrooms, a salad (dressing on the side) with water.

 

I snack on mixed nuts (no salt) whenever I feel hungry... almonds and walnuts are my favorites but will eat any nut....

 

Dinner is one (larger) cup of soup with no noodles (or if they are in there, I don't eat them).  I prefer broth type soups personally but have had Progresso LIght Cream soups and I have three whole wheat crackers and water.

 

I occasionally have a 1" x 1" little piece of cheeze with the cracker as well....

 

I think that after trial and error (and your trusty BS Meter) you'll find which foods give you the lowest glycemic load and which are highest (I can't eat pasta at all.... and also potato).... again, everyone is different,  but I would balk at "grazing" all day too.....


Per the diet i was given yesterday - a normal dinner would be 2 oz of meat - that is 1/4 of a hamburger - 1/2 c of carbs or 1 piece of bread or 1/2 a small potato and all the veggies i want as long as they do not have any butter, oil or salt on them. That is quite a difference from what you are eating.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,512
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.

151, it's a shocker-you just described my dinner or lunch....I couldn't believe that I could exist on such a small amount of protein-but I do! It can be done- and be enjoyable.  We 're used to meat being the star, but it's role for us is a supporting actor. Non-starchy vegetables are in the spotlight. 

 

Speaking of Brewer's yeast, I love the stuff and I use it frequently as a stand in for cheddar cheese on steamed vegetables. It does have a minuscule amount of calories and probably carbs, but I don't add that into my total caloric intake or carbs-and I count beryllium husks as a freebie as well.....

Poodlepet2

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,767
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.


@151949 wrote:

The final class was today. It was the only one I was really interested to go to. It was about diet - finally. Then the dietitian came in and spent 30 min blowing her own horn telling us how qualified she was - then she gave us a book to read for an hour and for the final hour she answered questions and taught us how she wants us to read labels. That was it. I had to ask about 5 times before she finally told us how many grams of carbs, fats and protein we are supposed to eat per meal and snack. She wants us to eat 3 meals - 30 gm of carbs/meal and 5 snacks at 15gm of carbs a day. Well, first - how can someone who is working eat all these meals ? Not all jobs are spent sitting at a desk where you can grab a snack while you work. Heck, when I was working we had to beg someone to watch our patients so we could go out to the BR - let alone go to lunch - unheard of - or to leave 5 times to get a snack. So , even though i no longer do work, I found the thought of stopping to eat 8 times a day to be very unrealistic. That you can not go more than 2 1/2 hours without food. The absolute final thing you are to do before you go to bed is eat a snack. then jump rioght into bed. It seems clear to me that if you have to eat this often - they are not allowing you enough to eat each time, because you should not have to eat this often. Anyway, in the end you eat 150gm of carbs/day, 50gm of fats, 1500mg of salt (less than a tsp) and try to get some fiber in as much as you can. I am planning to figure it out on my own and just use those daily totals as my guide - because i am not eating 8 times a day !!! i will do 50m gm of carbs 3 times a day and actually be satisfied with my meal, and get the same carb load.


@151949 Did she give you an overall calorie count per day - and gms of protein?

 

How are you doing so far?

Do the math.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.

[ Edited ]

@MarieIG wrote:

@151949 wrote:

The final class was today. It was the only one I was really interested to go to. It was about diet - finally. Then the dietitian came in and spent 30 min blowing her own horn telling us how qualified she was - then she gave us a book to read for an hour and for the final hour she answered questions and taught us how she wants us to read labels. That was it. I had to ask about 5 times before she finally told us how many grams of carbs, fats and protein we are supposed to eat per meal and snack. She wants us to eat 3 meals - 30 gm of carbs/meal and 5 snacks at 15gm of carbs a day. Well, first - how can someone who is working eat all these meals ? Not all jobs are spent sitting at a desk where you can grab a snack while you work. Heck, when I was working we had to beg someone to watch our patients so we could go out to the BR - let alone go to lunch - unheard of - or to leave 5 times to get a snack. So , even though i no longer do work, I found the thought of stopping to eat 8 times a day to be very unrealistic. That you can not go more than 2 1/2 hours without food. The absolute final thing you are to do before you go to bed is eat a snack. then jump rioght into bed. It seems clear to me that if you have to eat this often - they are not allowing you enough to eat each time, because you should not have to eat this often. Anyway, in the end you eat 150gm of carbs/day, 50gm of fats, 1500mg of salt (less than a tsp) and try to get some fiber in as much as you can. I am planning to figure it out on my own and just use those daily totals as my guide - because i am not eating 8 times a day !!! i will do 50m gm of carbs 3 times a day and actually be satisfied with my meal, and get the same carb load.


@151949 Did she give you an overall calorie count per day - and gms of protein?

 

How are you doing so far?


No - she did not give a calorie count or protein count just 1500mg of sodium - 50 gm of fat (I already only eat 40 gm of fat) and the carbs are broken up into 30 gm /meal and 15 gm per snack - you are not allowed to save from a snack though and have 45 gm later for a meal. So in the end it is 165 gm/day of carbs with 3 meals and 5 snacks but they MUST be eaten as she outlined, which I do not understand. 

I especially don't understand it because my medication is a 24 hour timed release so I have the same med in my blood 24 hr a day - even while i sleep - and she had no reason to offer WHY we have to eat by her rules and at her times. I intend to figure it out on my own.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,931
Registered: ‎09-01-2010

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.

It's been nearly 20 years since my husband was diagnosed with diabetes, and about 7 years for me.   We live with our diabetes, and are always mindful of what we're eating, but no food is off limits.   Dessert is a treat for us; not something you will find in this house every single day.  We do not deprive ourselves of anything, but we do limit consumption of many of our favorite things.   

 

Diabetes is a progressive disease that affects every part of your body.  My husband has seen his doctor every 3-4 months since his initial diagnosis in 1996, and has always been on medication and/or insulin, but now has peripheral artery disease, and severe neuropathy.   Many of the issues he now has, are attributed to the natural progression of the disease, so even with treatment, diabetes is actively progressing in your body.  

 

The real challenge is to find what works for each of us to control our daily readings and maintain an acceptable A1c.   My husband and I get up every morning with the mindset to breathe and enjoy every minute; not obsess over everything we eat.   

 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,095
Registered: ‎12-08-2013

Re: Some interesting diabetes facts I learned today.

I believe the reasoning behind eating many times a day is to keep blood sugar steady rather than up and down like a roller coaster. I usually eat 3 meals and an afternoon snack(if I feel like I need it) and a bedtime snack. You need to use your glucose meter to guide you as to when to eat and how many carbs to eat as this disease is very individual -- what works for me, may not work for you.