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Honored Contributor
Posts: 30,335
Registered: ‎08-23-2010

@pegsue wrote:

Hubby and I have done all we could to avoid it-social life is zero, we do grocery pick up, we go to work and that's it.  Well hubby brought the virus home and we both got sick.  First day back at my job-at a small law firm, 3 other secretaries and a handful of lawyers who are never there at the same time.  My first day back to work and I was shunned by everyone.  Now I didn't expect people to come up to me and stand and talk but the treatment  I got today ended up with me leaving the office about an hour after I arrived.  I was met with glaring stares, was told by several secretaries they don't want to be around me, another told me that if I see her boss I should run the other way because he is going to go crazy that I am there....another person had a portion of an area closed off by her area that I needed access to in order to gain access to a check book....

 

Of course my boss is out of town the whole week. convenient.  I emailed him and told him what was going on.  His opinion is that really I'm the safest person to be around-can't give it and can't get it....but that's not how anyone else sees it.  And I was especially disappointed in one of the girls I thought was a true friend.  I cried all the way home. 

 

Any advice?  Has this happened to anyone else?  How did you handle it?  I don't know what to do tomorrow.  TIA


 

@pegsue 

 

Honestly, I don't understand where the "shame" comes in.  Did you do anything wrong?  

 

You didn't mention it in your OP, but did you consult with the HR Dept (or HR Person) before returning to work?   They should have cleared a path for you (informationally) before returning.   A memo announcing your return and a recap of the pertinent facts ... or something to that effect.  

 

Did you speak to anyone before returning?

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,494
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@noodleann wrote:

@CelticCrafter wrote:

@noodleann wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

I will be honest and say that I would be apprehensive about being near someone who has had Covid, and I think that a lot of others would be too, whether they want to admit it or not, especially if they are still coughing.

 

 

 

 

 

 


I have to agree. Someone who's coughing and has had COVID, frankly, should not be in close contact with others, IMO. I would be more than uneasy about having to work with someone under those conditions.

 

While there's no excuse for brutish behavior by co-workers, the managers have an obligation to make EVERYONE feel safe, and they're not doing that. I don't recall having read of the OP having multiple negative tests--the kind that aren't plagued with as many false negatives as others-- or any negative tests, for that matter. Too little is still known about this virus for anyone to credibly say when anyone is "safe," least of all a nonmedical person. The employees should be distancing and masking, regardless.


How long would you expect people that have tested positive, followed the quarantine guidelines and still have a cough to stay home?  The cough could linger for a while.  It could also take weeks or months to test negative even though someone is no longer contagious.


 

How do you know that "someone is no longer contagious"?

 

You don't. 

 

I'd rather hurt someone's feelings, especially someone who may have returned to work prematurely, than get infected myself. 

 

I instinctively step away from people who've been  socializing without masks or distancing or live in households with workers or someone who's sick or been sick. I live alone and several animals depend on me for their care. I cannot afford to get sick and I apologize to NO ONE for behaving very cautiously until we build up solid data, which will take many more months of this, on how the virus behaves.

 

Let's not forget, too, that we're not talking about one virus alone. We're now talking about mutations that could behave differently. If they're more contagious, what would prevent them from being more persistent and rendering someone infectious longer?

 

This is a horrible situation and I am truly sorry that the OP had COVID-19 and had a bad experience upon returning to work. But pretending that we know more than we do and behaving unwisely is simply stupid.


Well, you either trust the experts or you don't trust the experts - but you can't have it both ways and when they say you can go back to work after 14 days.....

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,192
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

We are recovering now. My MIL says she doesn't want to share w anyone for fear of this.

info from CDC says a retest is not advised. You can retest positive for weeks to months and not be contagious.

After 10 days from first symptom you can leave house; as long as fever free 24hr and symptoms have diminished.

,

My work is asking 14 day, my husband work is asking for retest (we'll see)

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,494
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@springers wrote:

We are recovering now. My MIL says she doesn't want to share w anyone for fear of this.

info from CDC says a retest is not advised. You can retest positive for weeks to months and not be contagious.

After 10 days from first symptom you can leave house; as long as fever free 24hr and symptoms have diminished.

,

My work is asking 14 day, my husband work is asking for retest (we'll see)


@springers this is exactly what my daughter and son-in-law were told.  Their jobs asked them to stay home, no need to retest. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,457
Registered: ‎06-10-2015

@CelticCrafter wrote:

@noodleann wrote:

@CelticCrafter wrote:

@noodleann wrote:

@Anonymous032819 wrote:

I will be honest and say that I would be apprehensive about being near someone who has had Covid, and I think that a lot of others would be too, whether they want to admit it or not, especially if they are still coughing.

 

 

 

 

 

 


I have to agree. Someone who's coughing and has had COVID, frankly, should not be in close contact with others, IMO. I would be more than uneasy about having to work with someone under those conditions.

 

While there's no excuse for brutish behavior by co-workers, the managers have an obligation to make EVERYONE feel safe, and they're not doing that. I don't recall having read of the OP having multiple negative tests--the kind that aren't plagued with as many false negatives as others-- or any negative tests, for that matter. Too little is still known about this virus for anyone to credibly say when anyone is "safe," least of all a nonmedical person. The employees should be distancing and masking, regardless.


How long would you expect people that have tested positive, followed the quarantine guidelines and still have a cough to stay home?  The cough could linger for a while.  It could also take weeks or months to test negative even though someone is no longer contagious.


 

How do you know that "someone is no longer contagious"?

 

You don't. 

 

I'd rather hurt someone's feelings, especially someone who may have returned to work prematurely, than get infected myself. 

 

I instinctively step away from people who've been  socializing without masks or distancing or live in households with workers or someone who's sick or been sick. I live alone and several animals depend on me for their care. I cannot afford to get sick and I apologize to NO ONE for behaving very cautiously until we build up solid data, which will take many more months of this, on how the virus behaves.

 

Let's not forget, too, that we're not talking about one virus alone. We're now talking about mutations that could behave differently. If they're more contagious, what would prevent them from being more persistent and rendering someone infectious longer?

 

This is a horrible situation and I am truly sorry that the OP had COVID-19 and had a bad experience upon returning to work. But pretending that we know more than we do and behaving unwisely is simply stupid.


Well, you either trust the experts or you don't trust the experts - but you can't have it both ways and when they say you can go back to work after 14 days.....


Trusting the "experts" is like trusting the weather forecast. They seem nearly as changeable. It really burns me when I learn that they've made pronouncements not because they're right or true, but in order to effect a certain end. Like knowing this was an airborne disease and telling the public to not wear masks, done ostensibly in order to "save" the N95s for medical professionals. A worthy objective, but lying to us cost them credibility, and that's as it should be. If they'd stuck with science and stayed out of social engineering, things would have been far better.

 

So no, at this point the "experts" can pound sand. I'll keep checking hard medical info for updates, studies, etc., and always err on the side of caution. AFAIC, it's irresponsible to do otherwise.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,351
Registered: ‎02-19-2014

@noodleann wrote:


Trusting the "experts" is like trusting the weather forecast. They seem nearly as changeable. It really burns me when I learn that they've made pronouncements not because they're right or true, but in order to effect a certain end. Like knowing this was an airborne disease and telling the public to not wear masks, done ostensibly in order to "save" the N95s for medical professionals. A worthy objective, but lying to us cost them credibility, and that's as it should be. If they'd stuck with science and stayed out of social engineering, things would have been far better.

 

So no, at this point the "experts" can pound sand. I'll keep checking hard medical info for updates, studies, etc., and always err on the side of caution. AFAIC, it's irresponsible to do otherwise.


Eh. The hard medical info is written by experts. Medical experts.

When you’re accustomed to privilege, equality feels like oppression.
"Power without love is reckless and abusive, and love without power is sentimental and anemic." - Dr. Martin Luther King Jr
Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,560
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@pegsue ---people are so stupid--it should hurt to be stupid--I am very glad you are doing better--what a horrific thing to go thru---I would never shun anyone that made it thru any type of disaster. I guess just gird you loins and show them you are a much bigger person and do your job and let those idiots know what you are made of-------you deserve a badge of honor!!!!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 30,335
Registered: ‎08-23-2010

@Tinkrbl44 wrote:

@pegsue wrote:

Hubby and I have done all we could to avoid it-social life is zero, we do grocery pick up, we go to work and that's it.  Well hubby brought the virus home and we both got sick.  First day back at my job-at a small law firm, 3 other secretaries and a handful of lawyers who are never there at the same time.  My first day back to work and I was shunned by everyone.  Now I didn't expect people to come up to me and stand and talk but the treatment  I got today ended up with me leaving the office about an hour after I arrived.  I was met with glaring stares, was told by several secretaries they don't want to be around me, another told me that if I see her boss I should run the other way because he is going to go crazy that I am there....another person had a portion of an area closed off by her area that I needed access to in order to gain access to a check book....

 

Of course my boss is out of town the whole week. convenient.  I emailed him and told him what was going on.  His opinion is that really I'm the safest person to be around-can't give it and can't get it....but that's not how anyone else sees it.  And I was especially disappointed in one of the girls I thought was a true friend.  I cried all the way home. 

 

Any advice?  Has this happened to anyone else?  How did you handle it?  I don't know what to do tomorrow.  TIA


 

@pegsue 

 

Honestly, I don't understand where the "shame" comes in.  Did you do anything wrong?  

 

You didn't mention it in your OP, but did you consult with the HR Dept (or HR Person) before returning to work?   They should have cleared a path for you (informationally) before returning.   A memo announcing your return and a recap of the pertinent facts ... or something to that effect.  

 

Did you speak to anyone before returning?


 

@pegsue 

 

Did you talk to HR before returning to work?  

Valued Contributor
Posts: 538
Registered: ‎12-30-2019

@drizzellla  As A hairdresser that was a little much! If she's doing all the prerequisites our state board ask for that we do& then she does that in the middle of a haircut, she needs to go hide under a bed!

 

What bout the ones that don't tell her? Does she really think as bad as it is, that someone has not come in contact sitting in her chair?

 

Think I can go find a good haircut from someone who doesn't act like I have enough respect for them.

 

@pegsue  Real sorry for what you going thru.Like post said,if they that scared, they should have y'all work from home.

 

Just thinking bout daily readings of people/person in past stories had this happen to them.I ask myself if this is so different? J MO.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,036
Registered: ‎07-25-2010

I wish the OP would clarify.....are all employees required to wear masks at work?  Is social distancing followed?