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Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,139
Registered: ‎04-16-2010

@panda1234  I was going to type in a long post but then saw the fantastic info that @CoG left you and well, there it is Smiley Happy

 

We are in the process of getting a Medical Service dog for our eldest son. Due to his specific needs, it is an arduous process. One of the issues is, as @CoG  mentioned, these are NOT pets but 24 hour on duty companions for those with medical needs. That said, my son is primarily bed-ridden but the dog will need to be exercised so....how do we make him a member of the family but also be trained to serve my son/not leave his post unless asked? This is why you need to determine the exact needs the patient has and work with the organization/breeders/trainers. It's worth it though. 

 

Good luck and hope it all goes well. : )

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,463
Registered: ‎04-27-2015

@Foxxee wrote:

Generally, just having a dog helps with depression and anxiety, but is registering the dog as a support dog necessary?  Does the dog need to accompany her everywhere?  Is she being treated by a physician?

 

Many support dogs are not trained properly to be around a lot of people and in crowded places, become anxious themselves and have led to bites.  Then, the dog is blamed and could be euthanized.  

 

Of course, we don't know what's causing her depression and anxiety, not saying she's not a good candidate, dogs are wonderful, but if at all possible, shouldn't she learn to stand on her own two feet without relying on a dog to get her through life.  


@Foxxee   WOW that is pretty harsh. Some people are not capable of standing on their own two feet and need to rely on medication, service dogs and whatever else is available to them. All of her doctors feel this will be life changing for her. She is currently in the hospital for the second time in 7 weeks trying to get stabilized.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,463
Registered: ‎04-27-2015

@CoG wrote:

Dear OP :  you will find much misinformation posted on this forum about service dogs.

 

You are inquiring about a Medical Service Dog, subcategory Psychiatric Service Dog.  These lifesaving animals are prescribed by a physician, trained by professionals and granted protected status by our governing authorities.  They are not emotional support dogs or therapy dogs or pets.

 

Medical Service Dogs are employed to intervene in medical situations such as diabetic crises, cardiac emergencies, seizures etc.  They are medical tools. Psychiatric Service Dogs are specifically trained to act when necessary in depressive states, PTSD, dissociative states to state just a few examples.  

 

They are NOT PETS.  The animal need not be a dog, a young lady member of the society has a service horse, another a bird. The commitment should not be entered into lightly.  I encourage you to go to the Psychiatric Service Dog Society web site. There you will find the most comprehensive, accurate information available.  


@CoG  Thank you for the info. I went on their site and it is a wealth of information.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,538
Registered: ‎10-03-2014

Re: Service dogs

[ Edited ]

@panda1234 wrote:

@Foxxee wrote:

Generally, just having a dog helps with depression and anxiety, but is registering the dog as a support dog necessary?  Does the dog need to accompany her everywhere?  Is she being treated by a physician?

 

Many support dogs are not trained properly to be around a lot of people and in crowded places, become anxious themselves and have led to bites.  Then, the dog is blamed and could be euthanized.  

 

Of course, we don't know what's causing her depression and anxiety, not saying she's not a good candidate, dogs are wonderful, but if at all possible, shouldn't she learn to stand on her own two feet without relying on a dog to get her through life.  


@Foxxee   WOW that is pretty harsh. Some people are not capable of standing on their own two feet and need to rely on medication, service dogs and whatever else is available to them. All of her doctors feel this will be life changing for her. She is currently in the hospital for the second time in 7 weeks trying to get stabilized.

 

@panda1234 

 

Thanks for letting me know she's in the hospital and her doctors are recommending a support dog.  I wish her well and will pray for her recovery.  

 

There was no mention of that in your post.  None of us are mind readers.  I did say I don't know the cause of her depression and anxiety.  I asked if she was being treated by a physician.  Depression can be caused by quite a few things, much of the time very treatable.  

 

Please keep in mind those of us who post here only have the information that is provided.  Some have been coming here for years.  Me...about 5 months.  I don't know you or whether you have been posting about your daughter.

 

Based on the little information you provided in your initial post and the increasing trend of using support dogs as a permanent crutch, I stand by my response. That doesn't mean your daughter is not a good candidate, but many are not. 

 

Rather than helping patients remove the cause of depression and anxiety, doctors often just treat symptoms.  Of course, there are a few inherited depressive disorders, others where causes are unknown.  Do you know the diagnosis?  Based on that, my response might have been different.


 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 24,793
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Service dogs

[ Edited ]

I would think that would be a topic that would be discussed with a physician, and done only on the recommendation of a doctor.  Then there would be a specific agency and process to accommodate specific needs. 

 

Otherwise, you are talking about a pet. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,463
Registered: ‎04-27-2015

@Foxxee  My daughter is adopted and inherited bipolar, schizophrenia along with the depression and anxiety. She is what they call treatment resistant meaning none of the meds work for her, they do nothing. So, having a service dog is something we have not tried yet and it doesn’t involve meds. This is a huge commitment for all of us, financially and emotionally.

I didn’t post details because  I don’t like my post to be so long that people don’t want to read it. I do want to thank you for your response explaining why you felt the way you did.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,463
Registered: ‎04-27-2015

@Sooner wrote:

I would think that would be a topic that would be discussed with a physician, and done only on the recommendation of a doctor.  Then there would be a specific agency and process to accommodate specific needs. 

 

Otherwise, you are talking about a pet. 


@Sooner You are absolutely right, not to mention the financial end of it. This is like buying a car, an expensive car.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 16,094
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Research is the first thing. I'm not sure this is the answer for your daughter.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,407
Registered: ‎08-28-2010

Given your daughter's mental health history, it sounds like she is looking for an emotional support dog/animal.

 

Emotional support dogs are dogs that provide comfort and support in forms of affection and companionship for an individual suffering from various mental and emotional conditions.

 

Check out wwwdotcertapetdotcom/emotional-support-animal

 

@panda1234 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,529
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

@panda1234  - my heart goes out to you in dealing with this, I know it has to be difficult.

 

I've only had regular pets that have brought great comfort and joy to me through the years, so I guess I would be guided by the doctors and organizations that deal with this.

 

The one thing I do know is that the person has to be able to care for the animal, which is sometimes more than what you think, it can get overwhelming for them.  But it can also be a good responsibility for them to have and gets their mind on something else.

 

I'm hoping things will get better for her.  You can only do so much sometimes, so take care of yourself too. Heart