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Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,723
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics


@cherrywrote:

from Diabetes.co.uk

 

 

People who regularly consume the low-calorie sweetener sucralose may be putting themselves at greater risk of putting on weight, US researchers suggest.

The findings from a study by the George Washington University also suggest that weight gain may in turn increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Metabolic syndrome is a collective term for risk factors, including unhealthy cholesterol levels, abdominal fat, high blood pressure and high blood sugar, which increases the risk of heart attacks, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

In the first part of the study, the effects of a common low-calorie sweetener called sucralose were examined on human-derived stem cells from fat tissue in a laboratory experiment over 12 days.

Lead rsearcher Dr Sabyasachi Sen said: "Our stem cell-based studies indicate that low-calorie sweeteners promote additional fat accumulation within cells compared with cells not exposed to these substances, in a dose-dependent fashion - meaning that as the dose of sucralose is increased more cells showed increased fat droplet accumulation.

"This most likely occurs by increasing glucose entry into cells through increased activity of genes called glucose transporters."

The researchers believe the effect is more pronounced in overweight people because of increased insulin resistance and more glucose in the blood.

In a further test, the researchers looked at abdominal fat samples taken from 18 participants who regularly consumed low-calorie sweeteners consumers, four of whom were at a healthy weight; the rest were overweight.

Among frequent consumers of low-calorie sweeteners, the scientists noticed a rise in certain genes linked to increased fat production and inflammation. These findings matched the effects that occurred in the stem cell experiment.

The results showed a greater increase in activity leading to increased fat production in the people who were obese. This experiment had also previously been carried out by the team involving eight people and the results were similar.

Dr Sen added: "Because we found the same results with the, larger sample size, we have much more confidence that low-calorie sweeteners are causing metabolic dysfunction."

The findings of the study were presented at an Endocrine Society meeting, which took place in Chicago on March 18.


@cherry...very interesting and sometimes these types of studies just prove my questioning some of these artificial sweetners and whether they really work to help us reduce our overall caloric intake. I know there are times I would eat something with Splenda and it seemed to trigger me to eat more frequently. Of course, an anecdotal story does not mean all that much but based on this study it clearly supports my questioning whether they are worth ingesting in the end.

 

I started using artificial sweetners at the age of 11 during the World's Fair when they introduced Tab. I always had to watch my weight and I have been using them since then. The issue for me is that so many processed foods are available now, our systems are on over-load.

 

I was eating Stouffer's Lean Cuisine for a few days because I was too sick to cook and when I read the ingredients last night, they were just a lot of chemicals. Feeling fine today but I am sure these lab created beverages and convenience foods do us no favors...

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics

[ Edited ]

I am thinking about not having any diet coke @Trinity11.  It is sweetened with aspartame, and that is as bad splenda

 

It is really getting tricky to find a safe artificial sweetner...

 

When Tab was released in 1963, the Coca-Cola Company refused to release a diet soda with the Coca-Cola name, fearing that its flagship brand might suffer. Its rival Pepsi had no such qualms, and after the long-term success of its sugar-free Diet Pepsi (launched in 1964) became clear, Coca-Cola decided to launch a competing sugar-free brand under the Coca-Cola name, which could be marketed more easily than Tab.

Diet Coke does not use a modified form of the Coca-Cola recipe, but instead an entirely different formula. The controversial New Coke, introduced in 1985, used a version of the Diet Coke recipe that contained high fructose corn syrup and had a slightly different balance of ingredients. In 2004, Coca-Cola introduced Coca-Cola C2, which it claims tastes much closer to Coca-Cola but contains half the carbohydrates. In 2005, the company introduced Coca-Cola Zero (replaced by Coca-Cola Zero Sugar in 2017), a sugar-free variation of regular Coca-Cola.

Diet Coke was sweetened with aspartame, an artificial sweetener, after the sweetener became available in the United States in 1983.[3] Early on, to save money, this was also originally in a blend with saccharin. After Diet Rite cola advertised its 100 percent use of aspartame, and the manufacturer of NutraSweet (then G. D. Searle & Company) warned that the NutraSweet trademark would not be made available to a blend of sweeteners, Coca-Cola switched the formula to 100 percent NutraSweet. Diet Coke from fountain dispensers still contains some saccharin to extend shelf life.[4]

In 2005, under pressure from retailer Walmart (which was impressed with the popularity of Splenda sweetener), the company released a new formulation called "Diet Coke sweetened with Splenda".[5] Sucralose and acesulfame potassium replace aspartame in this version. Early sales were weaker than anticipated; however, Coca-Cola did little advertising for the brand, investing money and advertising in Coca-Cola Zero instead. By late 2009, some distributors had stopped supplying Diet Coke sweetened with Splenda.

In 2018, in an effort to be more appealing to millennials, Diet Coke began offering itself in a skinnier can (but still in 12 fluid ounces), and introduced four new flavors.[6]

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,551
Registered: ‎10-01-2010

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics

@cherry I appreciate your sharing any diabetic info you come across. I was diagnosed less than a year ago and it hasn't been an easy journey for me. Probably not for any of us. Just my 2 cents.

Trees are the lungs of the Earth
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics

I have been doing a tiny bit of research on diet drinks, so far Mayo clinic, and diabetic connect label them safe. However ,this is before the new findings ,so all things in moderation, I guess.

 

Thank you everyone, for your support. I am going to keep on doing this ,for as long as I can.

 

Feel free to share any information you find, and ask questions. Some of our friends have a lot to share , they are pros at this

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics

ENDO: Big Breakfast May Help in Diabetics Medium lunch and light dinner reduces insulin needs

  • by Ed Susman, Contributing Writer, MedPage Today March 19, 2018
  • This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today® and:

    Medpage Today
 

CHICAGO – A hearty breakfast, a medium lunch, and a light dinner might be the eating plan that can help diabetics reduce their dependence on insulin, researchers suggested here.

After 3 months on the big breakfast diet, patients who ate a high energy breakfast and had two smaller meals lost 11 pounds and used 20.5 fewer units of insulin a day from what they were using at the start of the trial, while patients who followed one of the traditional diabetes meals -- eating several meals across the day -- gained 3 pounds and used 2.2 more insulin units (P<0.05), reported Daniela Jakubowicz, MD, of the University of Tel Aviv in Israel.

 

"The hour of the day -- when you eat and how frequently you eat -- is more important that what you eat and how many calories you eat," said Jakubowicz at a press conference at ENDO, the annual meeting of The Endocrine Society. "The meal timing schedule, with a high energy breakfast diet, should be a strategy to improve diabetes control and outcome."

She said patients in the study, 11 women and 18 men, were divided into two groups. They were randomly assigned to eat diets of about 1,600 calories a day – but the big (high-energy) breakfast group had about 800 calories in the morning meal, and then about 550 calories at lunch and about 250 calories as the dinner meal, Jakubowicz told MedPage Today.

The other group consumed their food in diets that reflect usual eating patterns -- i.e., a light breakfast, a medium lunch, and a similar dinner, including three snacks during the day. The breakfast was supposed to be about 320 calories; lunch and dinner were 400 calories each, and the snacks were about 160 calories each.

Jakubowicz suggested that the latter diet plan among overweight, uncontrolled diabetes patients led to higher insulin use to contend with higher glucose readings, and the insulin use led to greater intake of foods and weight gain and worsening of diabetes control, and hence more insulin -- a vicious circle that resulted in less diabetes control and greater weight gain.

In addition to weight and reduced use of insulin, the main findings were as follows:

  • Subjects in the study who were on the high-energy breakfast diet also recorded lower hunger scores on a visual analog scale; after 3 months, the average score for the group was reduced 18 points, compared with a two-point increase in the score of the patients on the comparator diet plan (P<0.05)
  • Body mass index decreased by an average of 1.9 in the high-energy breakfast diet, but increased by 0.1 in those on the six-meal diet plan (P<0.05)
  • HbA1c decreased by 1.2 from 8.2% to 7% in the high-energy breakfast group and decreased by 0.2% in those on the six-meal diet plan, from 7.9% to 7.7% (P<0.05)
  • Overall glycemia measured by continuous glucose monitoring decreased in the high-energy breakfast diet by 38 mg/dl compared with a decrease of 17 mg/dl in the six-meal diet (P<0.05)

 

Participants in the study were about 69 years old, and body mass index was 32.2. Overall glycemia was assessed for 14 days at baseline and at the end of the intervention by continuous glucose monitoring, and the insulin dose was titrated biweekly.

Asked for her perspective, Anne Peters, MD, director of the Clinical Diabetes Programs at the Keck School of Medicine of the University of Southern California in Los Angeles, who was not involved with the study, told MedPage Today: "I think this diet idea has merit. I do this with some of my patients. I have always told my patients to eat dinner for breakfast and then don't eat after 7 pm. And eat a small dinner."

That said, Peters also suggested that doctors avoid "cookie cutter" diet plans for their patients: "No one diet plan fits everyone. We all have different metabolism rates."

She did note that the study had small numbers, so a larger study would be warranted to confirm the findings.

 

Jakubowicz and Peters disclosed no relevant relationships with industry.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,417
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics


@cherrywrote:

This might be important for some of you using Splenda. It may intensify Crohns symptoms

 

http://gephardtdaily.com/health/splenda-may-intensify-crohns-symptoms-study-finds/


I do think Splenda is really bad for everyone. I can't believe they still sell that junk.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,723
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics

@cherry...my most difficult time with blood sugars is in the morning. My liver makes glucose and dumps it in the morning. I can wake at 7 with a reading of 140 and go back to sleep, wake at 9 and have a 220. No food..nothing to eat or drink. I bolus it with 18 units of insulin. The issue is if I eat breakfast, I would need more insulin again to cover the meal. I am highly resistant now to insulin after years of diabetes.

 

I eat brunch and by that time I am down to 110. Then dinner at 7 because my husband gets home then. Usually on weekends we eat dinner earlier. The only time I snack is if I run a 70 or lower. 

 

I have often read, though, how good it is to eat a big breakfast..that it is healthier. Unfortunately, it ends my control and makes me twice as hungry.

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,739
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics

@Trinity11  you are a wonder. You give me such inspiration. You have been through so much ,and you are still so kind ,and generous to others..I am so glad that we are friends  Heart

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,723
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics


@cherrywrote:

@Trinity11  you are a wonder. You give me such inspiration. You have been through so much ,and you are still so kind ,and generous to others..I am so glad that we are friends  Heart


Thank you @cherry. The feeling is mutual. I enjoy and learn so much from you. Heart

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,417
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

Re: Seasonal changes for diabetics


@Trinity11wrote:

@cherrywrote:

from Diabetes.co.uk

 

 

People who regularly consume the low-calorie sweetener sucralose may be putting themselves at greater risk of putting on weight, US researchers suggest.

The findings from a study by the George Washington University also suggest that weight gain may in turn increase the risk of developing metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes.

Metabolic syndrome is a collective term for risk factors, including unhealthy cholesterol levels, abdominal fat, high blood pressure and high blood sugar, which increases the risk of heart attacks, stroke and type 2 diabetes.

In the first part of the study, the effects of a common low-calorie sweetener called sucralose were examined on human-derived stem cells from fat tissue in a laboratory experiment over 12 days.

Lead rsearcher Dr Sabyasachi Sen said: "Our stem cell-based studies indicate that low-calorie sweeteners promote additional fat accumulation within cells compared with cells not exposed to these substances, in a dose-dependent fashion - meaning that as the dose of sucralose is increased more cells showed increased fat droplet accumulation.

"This most likely occurs by increasing glucose entry into cells through increased activity of genes called glucose transporters."

The researchers believe the effect is more pronounced in overweight people because of increased insulin resistance and more glucose in the blood.

In a further test, the researchers looked at abdominal fat samples taken from 18 participants who regularly consumed low-calorie sweeteners consumers, four of whom were at a healthy weight; the rest were overweight.

Among frequent consumers of low-calorie sweeteners, the scientists noticed a rise in certain genes linked to increased fat production and inflammation. These findings matched the effects that occurred in the stem cell experiment.

The results showed a greater increase in activity leading to increased fat production in the people who were obese. This experiment had also previously been carried out by the team involving eight people and the results were similar.

Dr Sen added: "Because we found the same results with the, larger sample size, we have much more confidence that low-calorie sweeteners are causing metabolic dysfunction."

The findings of the study were presented at an Endocrine Society meeting, which took place in Chicago on March 18.


@cherry...very interesting and sometimes these types of studies just prove my questioning some of these artificial sweetners and whether they really work to help us reduce our overall caloric intake. I know there are times I would eat something with Splenda and it seemed to trigger me to eat more frequently. Of course, an anecdotal story does not mean all that much but based on this study it clearly supports my questioning whether they are worth ingesting in the end.

 

I started using artificial sweetners at the age of 11 during the World's Fair when they introduced Tab. I always had to watch my weight and I have been using them since then. The issue for me is that so many processed foods are available now, our systems are on over-load.

 

I was eating Stouffer's Lean Cuisine for a few days because I was too sick to cook and when I read the ingredients last night, they were just a lot of chemicals. Feeling fine today but I am sure these lab created beverages and convenience foods do us no favors...


I do agree with so-called healthier convenience foods. It is a real battled to find a way to trim down, and have more energy to exercise. I am with you on the balance control.It is really frustrating.Smiley Frustrated