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Registered: ‎03-19-2010

Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

Recently, my husband broke his nose.  It's a long story, but it involved a dance with the roll-out garbage bin.  All I know is he showed up at the back door with his entire head covered in blood.  Anyways, the ER doctor referred him to an ENT which turned out to be one of the better plastic surgeons in town.  He ended up having to go to outpatient surgery to have his nose reset although luckily he didn't have to do any internal work.  While he was prepping for the surgery they put those leg massagers on him, the ones that blow up and then lets the air out.  I'm familiar with those and that they are used to reduce the chance of blood clots.  That was about 3 weeks ago

 

Fast forward to today.  My husband tells me he is expecting a package today.  He said that leg massager made his legs feel so much better, they were less puffy, and that even now they still feel better, so he ordered himself one.

 

So, my question is does this indicate he has bad circulation in his legs?  I can't imagine that 2-3 hours of massage would still have an effect on him 2 to 3 weeks later.  What say you?  I'll never get him to go to the doctor.  He argued with me about taking him to the ER in the first place where he also got a couple of stitches below his eye.  

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers


@Icegoddess wrote:

Recently, my husband broke his nose.  It's a long story, but it involved a dance with the roll-out garbage bin.  All I know is he showed up at the back door with his entire head covered in blood.  Anyways, the ER doctor referred him to an ENT which turned out to be one of the better plastic surgeons in town.  He ended up having to go to outpatient surgery to have his nose reset although luckily he didn't have to do any internal work.  While he was prepping for the surgery they put those leg massagers on him, the ones that blow up and then lets the air out.  I'm familiar with those and that they are used to reduce the chance of blood clots.  That was about 3 weeks ago

 

Fast forward to today.  My husband tells me he is expecting a package today.  He said that leg massager made his legs feel so much better, they were less puffy, and that even now they still feel better, so he ordered himself one.

 

So, my question is does this indicate he has bad circulation in his legs?  I can't imagine that 2-3 hours of massage would still have an effect on him 2 to 3 weeks later.  What say you?  I'll never get him to go to the doctor.  He argued with me about taking him to the ER in the first place where he also got a couple of stitches below his eye.  


The only way to really find out about what's happening with his legs is to have them checked out by a doctor.

 

My legs would ache for the longest time, and for many years, too--ever since I was a teenager. It turned out that I had poor circulation in my legs.

 

As I got older, I developed varicose veins, and I was under my doctor's care for them.

 

I started out by wearing OTC compression stockings, and then long-story short, I ended up with a more serious case of Lymphedema in both legs, with a more severe case of poor circulation.

 

I wear medical-grade compression stockings today, and I also have to watch my diet--what I eat, including sodium intake because it does affect the swelling in my legs and hands.

 

I also take diuretics too, to help with the swelling. 

 

I also have to elevate my legs when I'm not on them/walking around/out walking around. 

 

This is just my own experience of dealing with my legs, and poor circulation in them.

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

I was in the hospital a year and a half ago for some cervical spine surgery and used these compression massagers while I was there, besides wearing compression hose. Upon discharge, I ordered both to use at home. The hospital massager felt so good.  The home version, not quite as strong but still felt good.  I have peripheral neuropathy and also had a persistent swelling problem so I was prescribed the compression hose and a diuretic.  The massager was my idea.  A year ago I changed my diet and am down  98.6 lbs.  I no longer have the swelling problem. The PN is a nerve damage issue so it won’t be cured.   

 

If you think your husband has a circulation problem, encourage him to keep using his legs by walking and not sitting for long periods. 

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

@Icegoddess 

 

I won't get into what it might indicate. I only know the main purpose they are mostly use. That would to help prevent DVT. 

 

I would suggest he tell his doctor about this as DVT are very dangerous. There are different types of scans used to look for blood clots, and I have had many of them.

 

As for the broken nose? You may remember my story months back about falling at 1 Sunday skating session and breaking my nose. Since I'd do many I knew exactly what to do when I heard it snap.

 

Put my gloved hand up to my nose/squeezed it tightly(you probably know blood on ice is like glue, unforgiving to blades). Got off the ice as quick as I could/got a bag of ice to help clot the blood. 

 

When the bleeding slowed way down, i popped my nose back in place. Stuffed cotton up my nose and went back to skating. Took a couple weeks for all the swelling to go down, but no more problems, other then it being bent again.

 

Talk with your husband about this and ask 

him if he has any unusual pains in his legs. Also check and see if he is retaining fluid in his lower legs.

 

 

hckynut 🏒

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

Yes @hckynut, I'm very familiar with bloodl clotting disorders.  My father had thrombophlebitis as did his mother and sister.  I had a genetic test done and I have a genetic propensity to clotting slightly higher than the general population.  Thrombophlebitis usually has symptoms that are easy for a doctor to see like a really puffy leg like my grandmother had with skin that is hot to the touch.  However, my father didn't have any of those symptoms.  He just passed out one day when one broke loose and went to his lungs.  Then, he was clotting wherever they would put an IV in.  They called him sludge blood at the hospital.  

 

The hematologist that did my test looked at me funny for getting the test although I was sent there by a surgeon before having some surgery done.  He said I would have to have the gene from both parents to have a problem.  When I went back to get my test results his attitude was more humbled.

 

There's only so much I can do to get my husband to go to the doctor.  He's pretty stubbron about that.  I get a physical every year and they check my leg circulation.  

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

[ Edited ]

 

@Icegoddess 

 

In your original post you asked: "So, my question is does this indicate he has bad circulation in his legs"?

 

I was doing my best at answering your question. This was based on my personal experiences with 2 different episodes of Pulmonary Embolism(PE)/Blood Clots in my Lungs.

 

I spent 8 days hospitalized with 1 event and 9 days with the other, tethered to a Heparin IV Drip, hoping my INR/ProTime Numbers would go up, lessening my chances of dying from a clot.

 

There is no genetic disorder in my family, other than Cardiac Disease, no indication  of blood clotting. I am not familiar with the medical terminology you use in your reply to my post, so won't comment on it.

 

ETA: I have since read about thrombophlebitis. I was quite familiar with Phlebitis, just not the other. I also see where your father had a PE, but didn't see the prognosis.

 

You posed a question and I replied based on my own personal experiences with PE, and the many different procedures used to detect, pretty much most sources, of blood clotting. 

 

As far as a "stubborn husband"?  I'll pass.

 

 

hckynut(john)

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

Hi @Icegoddess ,

 

I forgot to mention that as a patient, I personally knew that something wasn't right with my legs for a long time.

 

They just hurt too much, even when I was younger. 

 

I used to walk a lot.

 

I liked walking, and when I didn't have a car then, I used to walk and take public transportation to get around. My legs would really ache after walking. Something just seemed "off."

 

You just kind of know when something isn't right, I think. 

 

As you and Hkynut John both already mentioned, there are different tests that can be done to check the circulation in our legs, and to check for clots. The common ones are the Doppler Ultrasounds. 

 

I wish your husband the best of luck, regarding his health. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

 

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

@hckynut   My goodness John, you are  a tough one

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers

 

@Toppers3 

 

Thank you for your post. You mentioned what I have espoused for years on this Wellness Forum. 

 

Everyone should get to know their body, and I mean listening to it when is saying something to you. With age, each person should learn more about how their body functions, along with how they relate to what "just does not seem right".

 

Athletes generally are more in close tune to their bodies and what it is telling them. Most chose to listen, many times they do not. Similarly there are times when things still go well, but unfortunately, when it doesn't, it can cause serious injuries or health issues.

 

Your comment saying something just didn't feel right, is exactly a person that knows their body, and follows through accordingly. Sounds like you may have done something to get to the "why" of this feeling. Good for you.

 

 

hckynut 🏒

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Re: Question about Air Compression Leg Massagers


@Icegoddess wrote:

Recently, my husband broke his nose.  It's a long story, but it involved a dance with the roll-out garbage bin.  All I know is he showed up at the back door with his entire head covered in blood.  Anyways, the ER doctor referred him to an ENT which turned out to be one of the better plastic surgeons in town.  He ended up having to go to outpatient surgery to have his nose reset although luckily he didn't have to do any internal work.  While he was prepping for the surgery they put those leg massagers on him, the ones that blow up and then lets the air out.  I'm familiar with those and that they are used to reduce the chance of blood clots.  That was about 3 weeks ago

 

Fast forward to today.  My husband tells me he is expecting a package today.  He said that leg massager made his legs feel so much better, they were less puffy, and that even now they still feel better, so he ordered himself one.

 

So, my question is does this indicate he has bad circulation in his legs?  I can't imagine that 2-3 hours of massage would still have an effect on him 2 to 3 weeks later.  What say you?  I'll never get him to go to the doctor.  He argued with me about taking him to the ER in the first place where he also got a couple of stitches below his eye.  


@Icegoddess @Your husband could get a home video appointment with his primary care doctor just to ask if it ok to use the massager. He should get an ok before using anything. He can show the doctor his legs and any puffiness. If he has a home blood pressure monitor he can give the doctor his last few readings and he can update the doctor on his recent injury. It's a whole lot less hassle seeing the doctor from home. His pC care can get copies of the ER and surgery records because they might have done some tests that the PC doctor can put in his records.