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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,751
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

“Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

I'm sharing this new advice from the CDC with you.

 

"(CNN)Amid a coronavirus outbreak in the United States, the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention is encouraging older people and people with severe chronic medical conditions to "stay at home as much as possible."

This advice is on a CDC website that was posted Thursday, according to a CDC spokeswoman.
Early data suggests older people are twice as likely to have serious illness from the novel coronavirus, according to the CDC."
 

Above is quoted from CNN online. Here is the source.
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,751
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

Direct from the CDC:

 

What to do if you are at higher risk:
  • Stay at home as much as possible.
  • Make sure you have access to several weeks of medications and supplies in case you need to stay home for prolonged periods of time.
  • When you go out in public, keep away from others who are sick, limit close contact and wash your hands often.
  • Avoid crowds.
  • Stay up to date on CDC Travel Health Notices.

 

Who is at Higher Risk

Older adults and people who have severe chronic medical conditions like heart, lung or kidney disease seem to be at higher risk for more serious COVID-19 illness. Early data suggest older people are twice as likely to have serious COVID-19 illness. This may be because:

  • As people age, their immune systems change, making it harder for their body to fight off diseases and infection.
  • Many older adults are also more likely to have underlying health conditions that make it harder to cope with and recover from illness.

If a COVID-19 outbreak happens in your community, it could last for a long time. Depending on the severity of the outbreak, public health officials may recommend community actions to reduce exposures to COVID-19. These actions can slow the spread and reduce the impact of disease.

If you are at increased risk for COVID-19 complications due to age or because you have a severe underlying medical condition, it is especially important for you to take actions to reduce your risk of exposure.

Get Ready for COVID-19 Now
Consult with your health care provider for more information about monitoring your health for symptoms suggestive of COVID-19.
  • Have supplies on hand
  • Contact your healthcare provider to ask about obtaining extra necessary medications to have on hand in case there is an outbreak of COVID-19 in your community and you need to stay home for a prolonged period of time.
  • If you cannot get extra medications, consider using mail-order for medications.
  • Be sure you have over-the-counter medicines and medical supplies (tissues, etc.) to treat fever and other symptoms. Most people will be able to recover from COVID-19 at home.
  • Have enough household items and groceries on hand so that you will be prepared to stay at home for a period of time.
  • Avoid close contact with people who are sick
  • If COVID-19 is spreading in your community, take extra measures to put distance between yourself and other people
    • Stay home as much as possible.
      • Consider ways of getting food brought to your house through family, social, or commercial networks
    • Avoid crowds, especially in poorly ventilated spaces
  • Make a plan for what to do if you get sick
    • Stay in touch with others by phone or email. You may need to ask for help from friends, family, neighbors, community health workers, etc. if you become sick.
    • Determine who can provide you with care if your caregiver gets sick.
    • Take everyday preventive actions
      • Clean your hands often
      • Wash your hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds, especially after blowing your nose, coughing, or sneezing, or having been in a public place.
      • If soap and water are not available, use a hand sanitizer that contains at least 60% alcohol.
      • To the extent possible, avoid touching high-touch surfaces in public places – elevator buttons, door handles, handrails, handshaking with people, etc. Use a tissue or your sleeve to cover your hand or finger if you must touch something.
      • Wash your hands after touching surfaces in public places.
      • Avoid touching your face, nose, eyes, etc.
    • Clean and disinfect your home to remove germs: practice routine cleaning of frequently touched surfaces (for example: tables, doorknobs, light switches, handles, desks, toilets, faucets, sinks & cell phones)
Watch for symptoms and emergency warning signs
  • Pay attention for potential COVID-19 symptoms including, fever, cough, and shortness of breath. If you feel like you are developing symptoms, call your doctor.
  • If you develop emergency warning signs for COVID-19 get medical attention immediately. In adults, emergency warning signs*:
  • Difficulty breathing or shortness of breath
  • Persistent pain or pressure in the chest
  • New confusion or inability to arouse
  • Bluish lips or face

*This list is not all inclusive. Please consult your medical provider for any other symptom that is severe or concerning.

What to Do if You Get Sick

Stay home and call your doctor

  • Call your healthcare provider and let them know about your symptoms. Tell them that you have or may have COVID-19. This will help them take care of you and keep other people from getting infected or exposed.
  • If you are not sick enough to be hospitalized, you can recover at home. Follow CDC instructions for how to take care of yourself at home.
  • Know when to get emergency help
    • Get medical attention immediately if you have any of the emergency warning signs listed above.
What Others can do to Support Older Adults
Community Support for Older Adults
  • Community preparedness planning for COVID-19 should include older adults and people with disabilities, and the organizations that support them in their communities, to ensure their needs are taken into consideration.
    • Many of these individuals live in the community, and many depend on services and supports provided in their homes or in the community to maintain their health and independence.
  • Long-term care facilities should be vigilant to prevent the introduction and spread of COVID-19. Information for long-term care facilities can be found here.
Family and Caregiver Support
  • Know what medications your loved one is taking and see if you can help them have extra on hand.
  • Monitor food and other medical supplies (oxygen, incontinence, dialysis, wound care) needed and create a back-up plan.
  • Stock up on non-perishable food items to have on hand in your home to minimize trips to stores.
  • If you care for a loved one living in a care facility, monitor the situation, ask about the health of the other residents frequently and know the protocol if there is an outbreak.
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,257
Registered: ‎10-15-2018

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

@Mindy D, thank you for this important information. My husband and my mom both have chronic medical conditions and both are elderly.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,526
Registered: ‎01-02-2011

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

In a similar advisory from King County, WA, older people has been defined as 60 and older.  

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,751
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”


@hooked on books wrote:
@Mindy D, thank you for this important information. My husband and my mom both have chronic medical conditions and both are elderly.

You're welcome. By older people, they mean people in their sixties and upward. Our immune systems loose effectiveness with aging. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,702
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

Yes, I heard this today, regarding people who are sixty and older.  

Many of these people are still working, and need their income.  I have clients in their seventies who still work full time. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 22,058
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

I'm 64 and in good health. I don't plan on doing anything different especially staying at home. One size does not fit all.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,613
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

I work at home USUALLY

 

I'm not happy I have to go to the office twice next week.Woman Sad

 

There are always people coughing, sneezing there. Not great with covering the cough or sneeze.  I always use a lot of disinfectant and take Zicam for about a week after.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 7,610
Registered: ‎03-27-2010

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

[ Edited ]

@Mindy D   Thanks.... All is well in my home, practical application rules.  We are healthy and don't expect to get the virus, but incorporating a common-sense protocol. We are continuing our every day routine, with the exception of traveling out of the country.  

 

This is an opportunity to review immunity health, just as important as crowd control and washing hands, etc.:  for a healthy immunity system exercise/sleep/diet/stress levels/positive frame of mind - critical.  Not a lot has changed for us. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,986
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: “Older people... are encouraged to stay at home as much as possible.”

I'm a homebody anyway and since I have COPD (a lung disease), it's an easy decision for me to hunker down at home as usual in the winter months, to avoid the flu, pneumonia and now corona virus, which seems to be most dangerous with causing lung infections.

 

I still do what I need to do, I just try to be smart about it.

 

I just had a Dr. appt. and I chose a 7AM appt., no one else was there in the waiting room.

 

Hubs goes out to do most of our shopping, since he takes his Mom shopping once a week anyway.

 

So we're doing our normal winter routine and it works for us!

You never know how strong you are until being strong is the only choice you have.