Reply
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,858
Registered: ‎06-03-2017

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

@sidsmom Thank you for posting about this film.  I do not believe you posted information about this to fat shame anyone, but did it to be informative and help those who are struggling with weight issues.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,295
Registered: ‎03-27-2010

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

Who would have thoght an objective autopsy would stir up such controversy.  I am so appreciative for @sidsmom for her contributions that allow me to make informative reseach based decisions regarding my health.  I am also grateful for those who participate in the discussion without subjective personal attacks.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,415
Registered: ‎11-25-2011

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

@TenderMercies

@phoenixbrd

You two are correct...and thank you.

It’s just a film...a documentary the BCC released.

No more, no less.

But it IS the truth.

 

I’ve been down that path of obesity.  

And I know so.many.people who have been down that same path.  

We’ve all reached different levels of success with a simple change.

I just want everyone to know it’s never too late for optimum health.

Nothing feels better than happy & healthy. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,488
Registered: ‎04-18-2013

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

What if I were to have told the last 3 people that came to me for help with their exercise and nutrition to improve both their fitness and to lose a rather substantial amount of body fat, what if were to have told them to not bother, that they had a disease, that it didn't matter what they did, they had no control over their body fat levels and their weight, and the best they could do was to "eat everything in moderation"?

 

That would be ridiculous.

 

Incorrect and ridiculous.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,258
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

A few things:

 

Re the "Fava Beans" in the blue chart:  If you intend to commence eating fava beans, you must educate yourself in the consumtion of this bean.  If you don't have the knowledge to prepare and consume this bean properly, it can be toxic.  Just make sure you know what you're doing.

 

Mention was made of generational habits, with which I agree.  An interesting side note to that is that my mother was the only one of 5 sisters to move away from Michigan and scores and scores of relations.  She was also a horrible cook, so never went to any great extent to duplicate her mother's cooking (lard and fat laden).  Fast forward to now.  I am the oldest of 15 grandchildren and am one of only FOUR of the 15 who do NOT have adult onset diabetes.  Several of my first cousins have insulin pumps.

 

As with the physicians in the production, which some of you have viewed, I have years experience with donated specimens and am able to confirm all that's been said and more.  The worst part for myself and my staff, after any surgical training course that used an obese specimen, was closing incisions.  If you are more than a bit overweight, consider the challenges a potential surgeon will have down the road closing incisions. 

QVC Customer Care
Posts: 2,920
Registered: ‎06-14-2015

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

This post has been removed by QVC because it is argumentative

Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,415
Registered: ‎11-25-2011

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)


@sfnativewrote:

 

As with the physicians in the production, which some of you have viewed, I have years experience with donated specimens and am able to confirm all that's been said and more.  The worst part for myself and my staff, after any surgical training course that used an obese specimen, was closing incisions.  If you are more than a bit overweight, consider the challenges a potential surgeon will have down the road closing incisions. 


@sfnative

Fascinating!  So many questions, if you don’t mind....

 

If I had my career life to start over, I would’ve loved to be somewhere in the pathology/medical examiner/detective field.   The way a body can still ‘speak’ to you & give one so much information...that’s fascinating to me...but unfortunatley, I’m not smart enough to pass all this chemistry classes! Ha.  I bet your career changed so much throughout time.  

 

Question:

Regarding the donated body in this documentary...they placed the organs back inside...is the donated body cremated?  

 

I’ve also read where obese/morbidly obese bodies are harder to cremate.  

Is that true?  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,311
Registered: ‎05-01-2010

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

[ Edited ]

@sidsmomwrote:

@sfnativewrote:

 

As with the physicians in the production, which some of you have viewed, I have years experience with donated specimens and am able to confirm all that's been said and more.  The worst part for myself and my staff, after any surgical training course that used an obese specimen, was closing incisions.  If you are more than a bit overweight, consider the challenges a potential surgeon will have down the road closing incisions. 


@sfnative

Fascinating!  So many questions, if you don’t mind....

 

If I had my career life to start over, I would’ve loved to be somewhere in the pathology/medical examiner/detective field.   The way a body can still ‘speak’ to you & give one so much information...that’s fascinating to me...but unfortunatley, I’m not smart enough to pass all this chemistry classes! Ha.  I bet your career changed so much throughout time.  

 

Question:

Regarding the donated body in this documentary...they placed the organs back inside...is the donated body cremated?  

 

I’ve also read where obese/morbidly obese bodies are harder to cremate.  

Is that true?  


@sidsmom. This only pertains to your question about donated bodies. My parents donated to a teaching hospital. Yes the bodies were cremated and returned to a designated person exactly 2 years later. Husband and I have also done the paperwork for our bodies to go to a teaching hospital in NYC.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,416
Registered: ‎09-01-2010

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)

@Carmie,

AMEN sister!  

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,258
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Obesity: The Post Mortem (the film)


@sidsmomwrote:

@sfnativewrote:

 

As with the physicians in the production, which some of you have viewed, I have years experience with donated specimens and am able to confirm all that's been said and more.  The worst part for myself and my staff, after any surgical training course that used an obese specimen, was closing incisions.  If you are more than a bit overweight, consider the challenges a potential surgeon will have down the road closing incisions. 


@sfnative

Fascinating!  So many questions, if you don’t mind....

 

If I had my career life to start over, I would’ve loved to be somewhere in the pathology/medical examiner/detective field.   The way a body can still ‘speak’ to you & give one so much information...that’s fascinating to me...but unfortunatley, I’m not smart enough to pass all this chemistry classes! Ha.  I bet your career changed so much throughout time.  

 

Question:

Regarding the donated body in this documentary...they placed the organs back inside...is the donated body cremated?  

 

I’ve also read where obese/morbidly obese bodies are harder to cremate.  

Is that true?  


@sidsmom

 

Query #1:  All items pertinent to a specimen must be returned to the entity from which the specimen originated.  As in the film, all intact organs are returned to the body cavity.  However, consider 12 surgical specialties, in which hundreds of procedures are performed.  What I instigated was the assignment of large specimen bags, such as seen on "CSI," to each specimen.  In keeping with my SOPs, which became part of our Command's SOP and P&P, each bag was labeled with the specimen's identifying number.  All tiny/small tissue, whatever type, was carefully placed in such a bag.  After training, the bag or bags were affixed to the specimen with one or two large tie-wraps, then the entire specimen placed in a ________ bag for return.  For educational purposes, it is unlawful to "sell," so our specimens were "leased" for a very specific amount of time.  A very great deal of respect was always paid to each donor specimen or partial specimen.

 

Query #2:  The entity from which we procured our educational material, had (has) a crematorium onsite.  Yes, it does take a bit longer, as you mentioned. 

 

Sidebar #1:  This entity had a very large non-denominational church service once a year in thanks for all of the donors who made it possible for continuing physician, dental, pharmacology and nursing education and research programs.  They then took the unclaimed and separately contained ashes out on the Pacific Ocean and had a "ceremony of burial at sea" for these wonderful individuals.

 

Sidebar #2:  Something few realize is that the ability to donate and have one's ashes returned is something provided by some entities to families truly unable to even begin to pay for a funeral for a loved one (they cannot afford embalming or cremation).  I can't tell you how many times the relative of a loved one who was "critical" and in intensive care was referred to me, because the nursing staff knew I could refer them to the entity with which we had a business relationship.  Quite often, the family would ask if they could ask the entity if their loved one could come back to us, after passing, as a donor gift for physician education.  The local entity knew that there was much to be gained in terms of good will and so would insure that that donor came back to us for physician-surgeon education.  In every instance, the family left my office, after calling the entity for an appointment, with a great burden lifted from them, as they didn't want to turn their loved one over to city/county officials to be ever forgotten and lost, with ashes of thousands.

 

Hope this serves to answer your questions and provide clarity.