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Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,510
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

New York variant. Columbia University

[ Edited ]

Columbia University has an article about the New York variant of the virus for COVID -19. The article provides links to the abstract of a study at Columbia and a PDF available for free of the full study. The article provides a quick overview for those interested. Columbia researchers are just beginning to analyze  genetic changes in this variant, named B.1.526, that could make it troublesome on more than one level, including change in its spike protein. Coulimbia found that certain characteristics of this variant are shared with those of the S. African and Brazilian variants that have made these variants less responsive to vaccines and treatments. In one area of the spike protein of all three variants  lies a mutation named E484K, that seems to weaken the immune system's response to the virus. Antibodies from vaccinated people have been found less effective at neutralizing the New York variant B.1.351. This effect is mostly caused by the E484K mutation. 

 

Cases of the variant were first seen in November 2020. Prevalence of it has  quickly increased in New York, from 3% in Jan. 2021 to 12.3% in Feb. 2021. 

 

Here is Columbia's article.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwj7pL6At4XvAhWjTjABHUvoA1EQ...

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,926
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: New York variant. Columbia University


@Mindy D wrote:

Columbia University has an article about the New York variant of the virus for COVID -19. The article provides links to the abstract of a study at Columbia and a PDF available for free of the full study. The article provides a quick overview for those interested. Columbia researchers are just beginning to analyze  genetic changes in this variant, named B.1.526, that could make it troublesome on more than one level, including change in its spike protein. Cases of the variant were first seen in November 2020. Prevalence of it has  quickly increased in New York, from 3% in Jan. 2021 to 12.3% in Feb. 2021. 

 

Here is Columbia's article.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwj7pL6At4XvAhWjTjABHUvoA1EQ...


I find this very sad because it is extremely difficult to get the vaccine here on Long Island, New York. I have tried for weeks and nothing.. I am 67 with Type 1 diabetes, two heart attacks and a stroke. Who is getting this vaccine and how on earth are they getting it? Everyone I know who has concierge medicine already had their second shot. If the Head of Cardiology at St. Francis Hospital can't get any for his patients, then what's up with that??? I am beginning to feel like a prisoner in my own house. Rant over. LOL

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Posts: 33,580
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: New York variant. Columbia University

I was watching GMA this morning and Dr. Jha indicated that the variant he and others are most concerned about is the one from the UK.  He said that variant is predicted to really take hold in mid-March through the end of March so we need to get through that.

 

He said by April we will be clear of that and most people will be vaccinated. He indicated that we will have a relatively normal summer. 

 

Of course, initially experts were more worried about the variant from Brazil and now you don't really hear about that much.  It's back to the UK variant.  And one minute the vaccines work against these variants and the next they don't know. 

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Posts: 9,616
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: New York variant. Columbia University

@Trinity11    It does seem like a challenge in some areas, to get the vaccine.  Have you tried your state registration site, and are you able to travel to a site not in Long Island?

 

 

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Posts: 13,510
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: New York variant. Columbia University

[ Edited ]

@Trinity11 wrote:

@Mindy D wrote:

Columbia University has an article about the New York variant of the virus for COVID -19. The article provides links to the abstract of a study at Columbia and a PDF available for free of the full study. The article provides a quick overview for those interested. Columbia researchers are just beginning to analyze  genetic changes in this variant, named B.1.526, that could make it troublesome on more than one level, including change in its spike protein. Cases of the variant were first seen in November 2020. Prevalence of it has  quickly increased in New York, from 3% in Jan. 2021 to 12.3% in Feb. 2021. 

 

Here is Columbia's article.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwj7pL6At4XvAhWjTjABHUvoA1EQ...


I find this very sad because it is extremely difficult to get the vaccine here on Long Island, New York. I have tried for weeks and nothing.. I am 67 with Type 1 diabetes, two heart attacks and a stroke. Who is getting this vaccine and how on earth are they getting it? Everyone I know who has concierge medicine already had their second shot. If the Head of Cardiology at St. Francis Hospital can't get any for his patients, then what's up with that??? I am beginning to feel like a prisoner in my own house. Rant over. LOL


@Trinity11 @I'm very sorry for your predicament and I wish I understood why vaccinations are so slow in your area. There is now an online vaccine tracker, I think from The NewYork Times, online. Pharmacies are currently giving shots as well. CVS, Costco, Walgreens and more. Here in Florida, vaccinations have been steadily rolling out for those 65 and over and healthcare workers and at hospitals for some with underlying health conditions. I'll be looking into the vaccinations in your area and if I find anything that can help you I'll post back to you. 

@Trinity11 Does this help?

 

You can also call the New York State COVID-19 Vaccination Hotline at 1-833-NYS-4-VAX(1-833-697-4829). Once you have successfully scheduled an appointment, you will receive a confirmation email that contains a barcode. You will need to bring this to your appointment.

Step 2: Complete the Vaccine Form. Once you have a confirmed appointment, you must complete the New York State COVID-19 Vaccine Form. This form should be filled out online and you will receive a submission ID indicating completion. You will need to bring the submission ID to your appointment. If you cannot submit the form online, it will be available at the vaccination sites.

Step 3: Bring proof of eligibility to your appointment. Depending on your eligibility category, proof can include an employee ID card, a letter from an employer or affiliated organization, a pay stub, a driver's license, passport, or any legal proof of your date of birth and residency. See full list below. At the time of your appointment, you'll be asked a series of clinical questions to ensure readiness for a vaccine. You will be asked for insurance information BUT the vaccine is free and there will never be a charge to you. This information is for administrative use only.

Step 4: Your second dose appointment will be scheduled automatically when you receive your first vaccine dose. Your second appointment will be scheduled for the same time and at the same location, three weeks following your first dose. You will receive a card onsite with the date and time indicated and a confirmation email will follow a few days later. Please keep in mind when scheduling your first appointment that your second appointment will occur at the same time of day.

 

Acceptable forms of proof of eligibility

If an individual is eligible due to their employment status, they must prove they are employed in the State of New York. Such proof may include:

• an employee ID card or badge,
• a letter from an employer or affiliated organization, or
• a pay stub, depending on the specific priority status.

If an individual is eligible due to their age, they must produce proof of age and proof of residence in New York. To prove New York residence, an individual must show:

• One of the following: State or government-issued ID; Statement from landlord; Current rent receipt or lease; Mortgage records; or
• Two of the following: Statement from another person; Current mail; School records.

For age, such proof may include:

• Driver’s license or non-driver ID;
• Birth certificate issued by a state or local government;
• Current U.S passport or valid foreign passport;
• Permanent resident card;
• Certificate of Naturalization or Citizenship;
• Life insurance policy with birthdate; or
• Marriage certificate with birthdate.

 

To show they have comorbidities or underlying conditions, New Yorkers must provide documentation as required by the facility where they are getting vaccinated which must be either:

• Doctor's Letter, or
• Medical Information Evidencing Comorbidity, or
• Signed Certification

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Posts: 12,926
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: New York variant. Columbia University


@september wrote:

@Trinity11    It does seem like a challenge in some areas, to get the vaccine.  Have you tried your state registration site, and are you able to travel to a site not in Long Island?

 

 


Hi @september . Good to see you here. I have tried everywhere and none of my many physicians have access. I was told that places like Brooklyn and Queens, are not allowing anyone but occupants of the borough to get it at one of their sites. I tried CVS and various other drugstores and they claimed they are full until the middle of April. I go on websites daily, though.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,926
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: New York variant. Columbia University


@Mindy D wrote:

@Trinity11 wrote:

@Mindy D wrote:

Columbia University has an article about the New York variant of the virus for COVID -19. The article provides links to the abstract of a study at Columbia and a PDF available for free of the full study. The article provides a quick overview for those interested. Columbia researchers are just beginning to analyze  genetic changes in this variant, named B.1.526, that could make it troublesome on more than one level, including change in its spike protein. Cases of the variant were first seen in November 2020. Prevalence of it has  quickly increased in New York, from 3% in Jan. 2021 to 12.3% in Feb. 2021. 

 

Here is Columbia's article.

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwj7pL6At4XvAhWjTjABHUvoA1EQ...


I find this very sad because it is extremely difficult to get the vaccine here on Long Island, New York. I have tried for weeks and nothing.. I am 67 with Type 1 diabetes, two heart attacks and a stroke. Who is getting this vaccine and how on earth are they getting it? Everyone I know who has concierge medicine already had their second shot. If the Head of Cardiology at St. Francis Hospital can't get any for his patients, then what's up with that??? I am beginning to feel like a prisoner in my own house. Rant over. LOL


@Trinity11 @I'm very sorry for your predicament and I wish I understood why vaccinations are so slow in your area. There is now an online vaccine tracker, I think from The NewYork Times, online. Pharmacies are currently giving shots as well. CVS, Costco, Walgreens and more. Here in Florida, vaccinations have been steadily rolling out for those 65 and over and healthcare workers and at hospitals for some with underlying health conditions. I'll be looking into the vaccinations in your area and if I find anything that can help you I'll post back to you. 


That's very nice of you @Mindy D . I have tried all those sites and nothing is ever available. I called the State and was told the nearest site that had the vaccine was 465 miles away! Jones Beach had to let people know just the other day that some of the vaccines were tainted because they weren't kept cold enough? The roll out here is slow.

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Posts: 12,926
Registered: ‎11-16-2014

Re: New York variant. Columbia University

@Mindy D, that's the number I call and have been told there is nothing until May. I get April and May frequently from most of the sites I have been using.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,616
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: New York variant. Columbia University


@Trinity11 wrote:

@september wrote:

@Trinity11    It does seem like a challenge in some areas, to get the vaccine.  Have you tried your state registration site, and are you able to travel to a site not in Long Island?

 

 


Hi @september . Good to see you here. I have tried everywhere and none of my many physicians have access. I was told that places like Brooklyn and Queens, are not allowing anyone but occupants of the borough to get it at one of their sites. I tried CVS and various other drugstores and they claimed they are full until the middle of April. I go on websites daily, though.


Such a coincidence, I just checked the ny.gov site and saw that appts. in Brooklyn are available and thought that might not be too far from you. Did not think they would be restricting them to people only in their immediate area!

 

are the pharmacies actually giving out the April appts now?  If so, I'd suggest you take one and hope with more doses being sent out in the near future, you could get bumped up.  Or find out if there is a waitlist system available anywhere?  

I just got a friend of mine (health issues but only 62) on a waitlist here in my state.  

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Posts: 33,580
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: New York variant. Columbia University

@Trinity11 , I don't live in NY so I don't know the challenges there but here in Ohio, it was recommended that people sign up everywhere they could.  My aunt ended up getting called by 4 different places to get her vaccine.