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Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,801
Registered: ‎03-15-2010

In the Philadelphia Inquirer this morning there was an article about the above.  (I would post it but I don't know how.)  With women living longer than ever it seems as though no one has really studied the topic of getting mammograms after the age of 75. 

 

     Quote:  Guidelines issued by the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force said there's not enough evidence to recommend for or against mammograms at age 75 and older, because that age group hasn't been studied enought to tell.

 

Since it seems as though the medical field does studies on just about everything I find it unusal that there has been no studies done on mammograms after 75. 

 

Being 72, I would like to see studies done.  What do you think?  Do you think you would find this information useful?

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 16,780
Registered: ‎10-04-2010

JMHO, no it wouldn't help me. Others, it might help and they may want to know. I'm ok with things.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,856
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

You could make your own decision based on family history.  If your mother or sisters had BC, 'twould be good to get the mammo.  Just my opinion.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,325
Registered: ‎03-08-2014

I am just a simple soul so I figure if you have breasts at 75 years and up you should treat them with the same care and respect you did when you were younger. Seems simple to me. If there is cancer there I would want to know at any age and if the mammogram does any harm, well…it has been doing it all along. It seems to me the more they look into these thing the more care they cut and say it is no longer necessary.

 

With an aging population and the fact that they have not taken care of the money that was to go toward social security and Medicare they are not looking to add costs to their bottom line for this age group. Why waste the money on the “studies” and just let the patients use common sense. JMHO

Snarky responders need not reply. Move along and share your views elsewhere.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 16,780
Registered: ‎10-04-2010

Re: Mammograms for Elderly

[ Edited ]

@Havarti wrote:

I am just a simple soul so I figure if you have breasts at 75 years and up you should treat them with the same care and respect you did when you were younger. Seems simple to me. If there is cancer there I would want to know at any age and if the mammogram does any harm, well…it has been doing it all along. It seems to me the more they look into these thing the more care they cut and say it is no longer necessary.

 

With an aging population and the fact that they have not taken care of the money that was to go toward social security and Medicare they are not looking to add costs to their bottom line for this age group. Why waste the money on the “studies” and just let the patients use common sense. JMHO


Absolutely perfect answer!!!@Havarti

 

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,801
Registered: ‎03-15-2010

@Havarti wrote:

I am just a simple soul so I figure if you have breasts at 75 years and up you should treat them with the same care and respect you did when you were younger. Seems simple to me. If there is cancer there I would want to know at any age and if the mammogram does any harm, well…it has been doing it all along. It seems to me the more they look into these thing the more care they cut and say it is no longer necessary.

 

With an aging population and the fact that they have not taken care of the money that was to go toward social security and Medicare they are not looking to add costs to their bottom line for this age group. Why waste the money on the “studies” and just let the patients use common sense. JMHO


 

@Havarti - As much as I would like the information you are right.  It would be costly and common sense always is the right way to go.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,125
Registered: ‎09-01-2010

My mother is 81, and has chosen not to have mammograms for the last 2 years.   Her doctor still suggests it, but mom says no.   While I don't agree with moms opinion, I do respect it.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Since women over 75 still get breast cancer they still need to be doing mammograms over 75. Do we become disposable once we turn 75?

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,420
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

My neighbor was diagnosed with breast cancer at 90.  The lump was discovered during her annual mammogram.  She underwent surgery and chemo.  Next month she will be 93 and has more energy than I do.

 

Should there be a cut off age for testing?  Only you can make that decision.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 12,522
Registered: ‎06-09-2014

I think the reasoning I've heard is that detecting cancer at that age is probably not detecting a cancer that will kill you based on expected life spans.  In other words, something else will probably get you before the cancer does.  I think that's stupid but that's science for you.  Always do what you feel works for you.

 

This is my personal opinion but I am almost, almost completely sorry I started my mammograms according to guidelines (baseline at 35) and then every year starting at 40.  

 

In the past several years, I've had a lot of false positives or actually we just can't see because of your density but we can see enough in one area to worry the heck out of you, make you pay for extra tests (cost is on you when you get past your one annual preventative) and take years off your life with worry about something that as best as we can tell is probably not cancer but we don't want to be sued and you'll find the money because who wouldn't just in case you really are dying?  

 

I would never wish this on anyone and I completely understand why some doctors and organizations are saying enough with playing around with girls like me.  I'm almost to the point that I don't ever want to see another doctor again.  Odds are what they are picking up are cysts or benign tumors and frightening us and using up their own medical resources for what turns out to be completely nothing is just not worth it in a lot of people's opinions.  I'm quickly starting to agree with them.