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Super Contributor
Posts: 1,861
Registered: ‎09-14-2012

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

On 11/30/2014 Beccaboone2 said:
On 11/30/2014 happy housewife said:
On 11/30/2014 AnnaBella said:
On 11/30/2014 Ms X said:

I'd rather go to an M.D. I don't know much about osteopaths. Plus, if they take the natural approach they might try to make me do things I don't want to do, such as change my diet in a way that doesn't appeal to me.

They are Medical Doctors... just trained extra in more natural treatments VS just an allopathic training.

While I agree they are medical doctors they go to a different med school and they learn a different approach to disease. They DO NOT have MD after their name - they have DO. One should understand the difference if they are going to seek care from a DO.

OOPS - I think it is OD not DO Sorry.

Actually, that is incorrect. In many medical schools, MD's and DO's sit side by side in the same classes. MD's and DO's receive basically the same education, with DO's being required to take additional training in manipulation. Internship, residency, and fellowship requirements are the same, as are licensing and board certification processes.

Also, OD refers to an optometrist. DO is osteopathic doctor.

Yes!

My favorite Doctor was in PA., he was a D.O. and extremely knowledgeable (much moreso than most of the M.D.s I have seen as a patient, or have worked for).

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

On 11/30/2014 Beccaboone2 said:
On 11/30/2014 happy housewife said:
On 11/30/2014 AnnaBella said:
On 11/30/2014 Ms X said:

I'd rather go to an M.D. I don't know much about osteopaths. Plus, if they take the natural approach they might try to make me do things I don't want to do, such as change my diet in a way that doesn't appeal to me.

They are Medical Doctors... just trained extra in more natural treatments VS just an allopathic training.

While I agree they are medical doctors they go to a different med school and they learn a different approach to disease. They DO NOT have MD after their name - they have DO. One should understand the difference if they are going to seek care from a DO.

OOPS - I think it is OD not DO Sorry.

Actually, that is incorrect. In many medical schools, MD's and DO's sit side by side in the same classes. MD's and DO's receive basically the same education, with DO's being required to take additional training in manipulation. Internship, residency, and fellowship requirements are the same, as are licensing and board certification processes.

Also, OD refers to an optometrist. DO is osteopathic doctor.

All the osteopathic doctors I know attended Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine. (LECOM) they did not go to a regular med school. They do often do internships and residencies right beside MD doctors though.

Super Contributor
Posts: 2,103
Registered: ‎05-25-2014

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

To add to the above discussion between HH and Becca, the DOs at the hospital I work at all seem to have been educated at Osteopathic Medical Schools. I am not aware of any that share alma maters with the MDs.

This is no reflection on how I feel about their ability to provide adequate care - in fact, I mostly prefer working with the DOs. Smile I was just commenting on the trend I have noticed regarding their educational backgrounds.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,531
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

I read an artice about DOs. It's a growing field. Applicants do not usually present standardized scores and college averages as high as those applying for MDs but it's becoming more competitive. I have met DOs who are in residencies at the teaching hospital where some of my doctors are on faculty. I was once treated by a DO at my opthalmologist's office (not at the teaching hospital). He gave me a decent check-up but his English was so poor, so filled with grammatical errors, that I was made uneasy about him. He was not foreign born. Maybe I was too snobbish and I know that nobody speaks perfectly all the time, but that conversation with error-filled speech left me concerned about what else this guy didn't know.
Super Contributor
Posts: 2,103
Registered: ‎05-25-2014

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

On 11/30/2014 Vivian said: I read an artice about DOs. It's a growing field. Applicants do not usually present standardized scores and college averages as high as those applying for MDs but it's becoming more competitive. I have met DOs who are in residencies at the teaching hospital where some of my doctors are on faculty. I was once treated by a DO at my opthalmologist's office (not at the teaching hospital). He gave me a decent check-up but his English was so poor, so filled with grammatical errors, that I was made uneasy about him. He was not foreign born. Maybe I was too snobbish and I know that nobody speaks perfectly all the time, but that conversation with error-filled speech left me concerned about what else this guy didn't know.

Yes, DOs are typically considered "lower-tier" med school applicants. (Again, this is no reflection on how I personally feel about their abilities.)

Honored Contributor
Posts: 9,413
Registered: ‎07-29-2014

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

JMO, but osteopathic docs are usually more open-minded when it comes to "alternative" (holistic and natural) treatments, which I prefer to just subscribing a pill, etc..

For example, very successful Asian (Chinese and Indian) methods have been proven for thousands of years, far longer than Western medicine.

Just because something doesn't exist in a Western medicine textbook is no reason to poo-poo it's efficacy.

My dream doc would be an integrative medicine specialist, like Dr. Andrew Weil. 8)

"Smart people learn from everything and everyone, average people only from their own experiences."
Super Contributor
Posts: 383
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

For what's it's worth, the term "osteopath" is antiquated. And offensive to some. Don't call your doc an "osteopath." I guarantee you he or she won't appreciate it.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 20,570
Registered: ‎06-13-2012

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

On 11/29/2014 feline groovy said:

Osteopaths treat the body as a whole, not just as a symptom like many MD's.

My own personal preference. 8)

same here!

Super Contributor
Posts: 2,007
Registered: ‎04-05-2010

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

The Dr that delivered both my boys was a DO, our PC for 25 years was a DO, now our PC is an MD, but he's very thorough and thoughtful - has called us after 8 pm when my DH had acute anemia. The group he's in is 50/50 MD and DO and they practice in the same hospitals. My neurologist is a DO and she is the top neurologist in the city. It depends on the Dr.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,504
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: Is your Doctor an Osteopathic Doctor?

People who live in the Western states - probably people who live west of the Midwest - have traditionally not seen many osteopaths. When I started working in hospitals in 1970, in California osteopaths were considered well below MDs in education and ability. Hospitals did not really want them on staff. It was difficult to find many here for decades. There are more now, I think in part because managed care organizations like Kaiser and Humana, large independent clinics and practices that serve a high percentage of Medicare patients are happy to have them for at least one reason that's the same as why offices have more PA's and Nurse Practitioners now - they are less expensive to have on the payroll. But they are also more likely to spend time listening to a patient, which is very valuable in today's largely impersonal office and clinic environments.

I am open to a slightly more holistic and alternative approach, but often Asian and Indian MDs are this way as well. I'm sure it depends on the state you live in, but many of the treatments, therapies and medicines that might be recommended by an osteopath would not be covered/paid for by a typical workplace group insurance policy. For example, my previous policy covered acupuncture and the new policy does not - nor chiropractic care. They also do not cover anything from a compounding pharmacy. And it's Blue Shield/Blue Cross.

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