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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,354
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

You will never convince me that permissive lifestyle choices are soley to blame for the spread of this insidious diseae.

 

I know people who have had this, and cured,; they have lived lives like cloistered religious-and came down w/Hep C.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,033
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

Am I understanding correctly that if you regularly donate blood, they screen for Hep C and would tell me? 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

The only ones recommending this test are the ones selling the drug to treat hep C. Don't fall for every ad you see on TV.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 24,389
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

Hep C is getting a lot of attention now due to the newer treatments, but the reality is that most patients with Hep C will die with Hep C rather than from Hep C. Statistically, it's not generally a huge problem for most people with it. Our livers regenerate and assuming you're not also an alcoholic, in most cases you can live with Hep C for decades without it adversely affecting your health. Until recently the treatments were often worse than the condition for most patients. The newer treatments have fewer side effects and are generally more effective, but also insanely expensive.

 

The government (CDC, FDA, NIH and others) were pretty negligent when it came to blood safety until HIV emerged on the scene. Blood product purification methods (detergent and heat treating) had been developed in the 1930's-1950's, but the government felt that the risk was small enough to not justify the use of such practices to ensure a safe blood supply. Instead they established data collection centers for those at high risk of being contaminated (hemophiliacs among them) where they could monitor their health and use them as the "canaries in the coal mines" so when they started to die or develop issues they'd know there was a more widespread problem and decide to address it or not.

 

When HIV came along it defied their thinking on how a blood born pathogen would emerge. The long incubation time of HIV (seven years or more) gave it time to spread widely before the government could take action to slow the spread. By then the clotting factor used by hemophiliacs was being made from lots of pooled plasma containing ten thousand to a hundred thousand units of plasma. Pretty much every hemophiliac who used clotting factor before the mid eighties was exposed to the whole gamut of the hepatitis family and HIV simply due to the size fo the plasma pools and the lack of any protective action to deactivate any active pathogens in the plasma. Once it was evident that the HIV virus was being spread through the plasma pools the government finally relented and approved the treatment methods that had been developed back in the 30's-50's.

 

How dangerous is Hep C? It depends on who you ask. If you're not constantly re-exposing yourself by sharing used syringes, you don't drink, don't smoke, you don't use much in the way of drugs (legal or otherwise) and you don't do a lot to stress out your liver, you'll more likely die with Hep C than from Hep C. Your body will be in a constant fight with Hep C where your body will recognize the virus and fight it off, only to have the virus evolve into a new form that surges back forward a bit until your body launches a new counterattack that knocks it back down. If you get especially unlucky and either get, or have your virus evolve into an especially aggressive version that gets the upper hold, then things could get messier for you, but in the majority of cases most people just cruise through life with Hep C and don't die from it.

 

Just to give it some perspective, one in three hundred Americans are said to have Hep C and deaths from it aren't exactly front page news. If they were dying at a large rate, it would be in the news a whole lot more than it is. Lifestyle plays a big role in liver health. Alcohol consumption, smoking, and drug use (legal or illegal) will stress your liver and can cause you significant issues if you also have Hep C, but they can also cause significant health issues even if you don't.

 

Much of the talk of Hep C is now driven by the drug companies who want all of those Americans with the virus to take their newest treatment. It's not necessarily what's in the best interest of the virus carriers as it's in the best interest of the drug company's bottom line. If you have Hep C monitoring it is wise, but in most cases, most people die with Hep C rather than from Hep C.

Fly!!! Eagles!!! Fly!!!
Honored Contributor
Posts: 36,223
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

[ Edited ]

@gardenman wrote:

Hep C is getting a lot of attention now due to the newer treatments, but the reality is that most patients with Hep C will die with Hep C rather than from Hep C. Statistically, it's not generally a huge problem for most people with it. Our livers regenerate and assuming you're not also an alcoholic, in most cases you can live with Hep C for decades without it adversely affecting your health. Until recently the treatments were often worse than the condition for most patients. The newer treatments have fewer side effects and are generally more effective, but also insanely expensive.

 

The government (CDC, FDA, NIH and others) were pretty negligent when it came to blood safety until HIV emerged on the scene. Blood product purification methods (detergent and heat treating) had been developed in the 1930's-1950's, but the government felt that the risk was small enough to not justify the use of such practices to ensure a safe blood supply. Instead they established data collection centers for those at high risk of being contaminated (hemophiliacs among them) where they could monitor their health and use them as the "canaries in the coal mines" so when they started to die or develop issues they'd know there was a more widespread problem and decide to address it or not.

 

When HIV came along it defied their thinking on how a blood born pathogen would emerge. The long incubation time of HIV (seven years or more) gave it time to spread widely before the government could take action to slow the spread. By then the clotting factor used by hemophiliacs was being made from lots of pooled plasma containing ten thousand to a hundred thousand units of plasma. Pretty much every hemophiliac who used clotting factor before the mid eighties was exposed to the whole gamut of the hepatitis family and HIV simply due to the size fo the plasma pools and the lack of any protective action to deactivate any active pathogens in the plasma. Once it was evident that the HIV virus was being spread through the plasma pools the government finally relented and approved the treatment methods that had been developed back in the 30's-50's.

 

How dangerous is Hep C? It depends on who you ask. If you're not constantly re-exposing yourself by sharing used syringes, you don't drink, don't smoke, you don't use much in the way of drugs (legal or otherwise) and you don't do a lot to stress out your liver, you'll more likely die with Hep C than from Hep C. Your body will be in a constant fight with Hep C where your body will recognize the virus and fight it off, only to have the virus evolve into a new form that surges back forward a bit until your body launches a new counterattack that knocks it back down. If you get especially unlucky and either get, or have your virus evolve into an especially aggressive version that gets the upper hold, then things could get messier for you, but in the majority of cases most people just cruise through life with Hep C and don't die from it.

 

Just to give it some perspective, one in three hundred Americans are said to have Hep C and deaths from it aren't exactly front page news. If they were dying at a large rate, it would be in the news a whole lot more than it is. Lifestyle plays a big role in liver health. Alcohol consumption, smoking, and drug use (legal or illegal) will stress your liver and can cause you significant issues if you also have Hep C, but they can also cause significant health issues even if you don't.

 

Much of the talk of Hep C is now driven by the drug companies who want all of those Americans with the virus to take their newest treatment. It's not necessarily what's in the best interest of the virus carriers as it's in the best interest of the drug company's bottom line. If you have Hep C monitoring it is wise, but in most cases, most people die with Hep C rather than from Hep C.


This is absolutely not true! Blood is never treated with heat or detergents. I am a retired Blood Banker and I know the practices of keeping our blood supply safe. This information is not correct. The only thing that is done to blood or any blood product made from donations is irradiation of the blood or product upon request from the treating physician. This irradiation deactivates potential tissue rejection often seen when leucocytes are transfused into immunocomp people. irradiation does not involve killing viruses. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 36,223
Registered: ‎05-22-2016

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

[ Edited ]

@debcakes wrote:

Am I understanding correctly that if you regularly donate blood, they screen for Hep C and would tell me? 


These are the diseases that will be tested for:

- HIV

- Hep B

- Hep C

- Syphilis

 

If any of these are positive, then you will be confidentially contacted by the Dept of Health regarding your test results. These are considered  "reportable" diseases by the CDC.@debcakes 

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 99
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

I had the blo D test last year. My liver was up just a tiny bit so,my Dr. Did the blood test. I  did not have it.

 

MaryJo ,Ut.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 15,697
Registered: ‎09-01-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69

@debcakes,

Yes, the Red Cross will contact you by mail if your blood fails any of their testing processes.   They will tell you your recent donation was destroyed, and depending on the type of virus/antibodies found in your blood, your name may or may not be flagged in their system.   

 

The Red Cross has an extensive, and continuous process for testing their donors blood.   It's a given that our blood is tested for CMV, HIV, Hep B and C, STD's, Zika, etc., regardless of what type of blood product you donate.   As a platelet donor, I know that my blood is also tested for HLA antibodies, which I might carry, and do not increase my risk for illness, but might cause a serious blood transfusion risk known as TRALI in patients who are most susceptible.   

 

Women who have been pregnant are more likely to carry HLA antibodies.  My local donor center lost about 15 long time platelet donors when TRALI testing was done in our region in 2015.  Those women are still able to donate whole blood, but not platelets.   

 

As long as the Red Cross continues to accept your donations, I think you can be assured your blood is safe and free of major viruses.   

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,354
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69


@SilleeMee wrote:

@gardenman wrote:

Hep C is getting a lot of attention now due to the newer treatments, but the reality is that most patients with Hep C will die with Hep C rather than from Hep C. Statistically, it's not generally a huge problem for most people with it. Our livers regenerate and assuming you're not also an alcoholic, in most cases you can live with Hep C for decades without it adversely affecting your health. Until recently the treatments were often worse than the condition for most patients. The newer treatments have fewer side effects and are generally more effective, but also insanely expensive.

 

The government (CDC, FDA, NIH and others) were pretty negligent when it came to blood safety until HIV emerged on the scene. Blood product purification methods (detergent and heat treating) had been developed in the 1930's-1950's, but the government felt that the risk was small enough to not justify the use of such practices to ensure a safe blood supply. Instead they established data collection centers for those at high risk of being contaminated (hemophiliacs among them) where they could monitor their health and use them as the "canaries in the coal mines" so when they started to die or develop issues they'd know there was a more widespread problem and decide to address it or not.

 

When HIV came along it defied their thinking on how a blood born pathogen would emerge. The long incubation time of HIV (seven years or more) gave it time to spread widely before the government could take action to slow the spread. By then the clotting factor used by hemophiliacs was being made from lots of pooled plasma containing ten thousand to a hundred thousand units of plasma. Pretty much every hemophiliac who used clotting factor before the mid eighties was exposed to the whole gamut of the hepatitis family and HIV simply due to the size fo the plasma pools and the lack of any protective action to deactivate any active pathogens in the plasma. Once it was evident that the HIV virus was being spread through the plasma pools the government finally relented and approved the treatment methods that had been developed back in the 30's-50's.

 

How dangerous is Hep C? It depends on who you ask. If you're not constantly re-exposing yourself by sharing used syringes, you don't drink, don't smoke, you don't use much in the way of drugs (legal or otherwise) and you don't do a lot to stress out your liver, you'll more likely die with Hep C than from Hep C. Your body will be in a constant fight with Hep C where your body will recognize the virus and fight it off, only to have the virus evolve into a new form that surges back forward a bit until your body launches a new counterattack that knocks it back down. If you get especially unlucky and either get, or have your virus evolve into an especially aggressive version that gets the upper hold, then things could get messier for you, but in the majority of cases most people just cruise through life with Hep C and don't die from it.

 

Just to give it some perspective, one in three hundred Americans are said to have Hep C and deaths from it aren't exactly front page news. If they were dying at a large rate, it would be in the news a whole lot more than it is. Lifestyle plays a big role in liver health. Alcohol consumption, smoking, and drug use (legal or illegal) will stress your liver and can cause you significant issues if you also have Hep C, but they can also cause significant health issues even if you don't.

 

Much of the talk of Hep C is now driven by the drug companies who want all of those Americans with the virus to take their newest treatment. It's not necessarily what's in the best interest of the virus carriers as it's in the best interest of the drug company's bottom line. If you have Hep C monitoring it is wise, but in most cases, most people die with Hep C rather than from Hep C.


This is absolutely not true! Blood is never treated with heat or detergents. I am a retired Blood Banker and I know the practices of keeping our blood supply safe. This information is not correct. The only thing that is done to blood or any blood product made from donations is irradiation of the blood or product upon request from the treating physician. This irradiation deactivates potential tissue rejection often seen when leucocytes are transfused into immunocomp people. irradiation does not involve killing viruses. 


 

Heating and detergents used as preventativetechniques 1930-'50's. The gov't. was negligent and decided to 'blame the victim'.

 

As far as HepC deaths making the news, it was pretty big news when Gregg Allman passed from liver cancer associated w/his  previous Hep C infection.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 24,389
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Hep C test for baby boomers ages 51-69


@SilleeMee wrote:

@gardenman wrote:

Hep C is getting a lot of attention now due to the newer treatments, but the reality is that most patients with Hep C will die with Hep C rather than from Hep C. Statistically, it's not generally a huge problem for most people with it. Our livers regenerate and assuming you're not also an alcoholic, in most cases you can live with Hep C for decades without it adversely affecting your health. Until recently the treatments were often worse than the condition for most patients. The newer treatments have fewer side effects and are generally more effective, but also insanely expensive.

 

The government (CDC, FDA, NIH and others) were pretty negligent when it came to blood safety until HIV emerged on the scene. Blood product purification methods (detergent and heat treating) had been developed in the 1930's-1950's, but the government felt that the risk was small enough to not justify the use of such practices to ensure a safe blood supply. Instead they established data collection centers for those at high risk of being contaminated (hemophiliacs among them) where they could monitor their health and use them as the "canaries in the coal mines" so when they started to die or develop issues they'd know there was a more widespread problem and decide to address it or not.

 

When HIV came along it defied their thinking on how a blood born pathogen would emerge. The long incubation time of HIV (seven years or more) gave it time to spread widely before the government could take action to slow the spread. By then the clotting factor used by hemophiliacs was being made from lots of pooled plasma containing ten thousand to a hundred thousand units of plasma. Pretty much every hemophiliac who used clotting factor before the mid eighties was exposed to the whole gamut of the hepatitis family and HIV simply due to the size fo the plasma pools and the lack of any protective action to deactivate any active pathogens in the plasma. Once it was evident that the HIV virus was being spread through the plasma pools the government finally relented and approved the treatment methods that had been developed back in the 30's-50's.

 

How dangerous is Hep C? It depends on who you ask. If you're not constantly re-exposing yourself by sharing used syringes, you don't drink, don't smoke, you don't use much in the way of drugs (legal or otherwise) and you don't do a lot to stress out your liver, you'll more likely die with Hep C than from Hep C. Your body will be in a constant fight with Hep C where your body will recognize the virus and fight it off, only to have the virus evolve into a new form that surges back forward a bit until your body launches a new counterattack that knocks it back down. If you get especially unlucky and either get, or have your virus evolve into an especially aggressive version that gets the upper hold, then things could get messier for you, but in the majority of cases most people just cruise through life with Hep C and don't die from it.

 

Just to give it some perspective, one in three hundred Americans are said to have Hep C and deaths from it aren't exactly front page news. If they were dying at a large rate, it would be in the news a whole lot more than it is. Lifestyle plays a big role in liver health. Alcohol consumption, smoking, and drug use (legal or illegal) will stress your liver and can cause you significant issues if you also have Hep C, but they can also cause significant health issues even if you don't.

 

Much of the talk of Hep C is now driven by the drug companies who want all of those Americans with the virus to take their newest treatment. It's not necessarily what's in the best interest of the virus carriers as it's in the best interest of the drug company's bottom line. If you have Hep C monitoring it is wise, but in most cases, most people die with Hep C rather than from Hep C.


This is absolutely not true! Blood is never treated with heat or detergents. I am a retired Blood Banker and I know the practices of keeping our blood supply safe. This information is not correct. The only thing that is done to blood or any blood product made from donations is irradiation of the blood or product upon request from the treating physician. This irradiation deactivates potential tissue rejection often seen when leucocytes are transfused into immunocomp people. irradiation does not involve killing viruses. 


You might want to check these links.

 

Here's one of many you'll find by Googling "Use of detergents in treating blood products."  

https://www.readbyqxmd.com/read/21779207/the-use-of-solvent-detergent-treatment-in-pathogen-reductio...

 

And here's one of many links to the use of heat to treat clotting factor.

https://www.google.com/patents/US5118795

 

These techniques were developed from the 30's to the 50's but never deployed. They were tested, found to be effective, and shelved until HIV was already widespread. As a hemophiliac who survived that period I can assure you that the information I posted was correct. Both detergents and heat treatment were developed, tested, proven effective, then shelved until it was too little, too late. By the mid eighties, researchers started to get interested in those techniques again, but they'd been around for decades before and just never used.

 

I believe one or more of the Scandanavian countries did in fact require all clotting factor sold there to be treated in this manner and they had essentially no infected hemophiliacs, but in the US the government felt it was unnecessary and imposed too high a cost on the products, so they refused to approve it until it was too late. The US even allowed the continued sale of known contaminated clotting factors to Asia, Europe and Central America, long after safer products were available.

 

Here's one of many articles you can find about that and the role of the FDA in those sales.

http://articles.mercola.com/sites/articles/archive/2006/08/05/bayer-sells-aids-infected-drug-banned-...

 

The more you know about the role of our government in the managing of the safety of the blood supply, the less trust you'll have in them. The FDA, CDC, NIH, and other government agencies all played a role in the deaths of tens of thousands of people. 

Fly!!! Eagles!!! Fly!!!