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Contributor
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎05-06-2015

Hi JackieHN and bowregard:

 

Thanks for the kind words, encouragement  and your  help.

 

What is it about cancer survivors?  They are all so kind, helpful, and super nice people.  Is is because we went through a life changing event?  And, now we uderstand what truly matters in life?

 

When I read the postings from the breast cancer gals  I an in awe.  I basically  sailed through my treatments compared to you gals. 

 

Kudos to all of you.  And. good health to all..

 

Contributor
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎05-06-2015

bowregard –when you next see your dr.,  who you say will examine you from head to toe, I suggest purple or some other neat but loud color painted toes.  Might be a bit of fun.  Stay well.

 

Gcr18 – well Sunday is coming soon and I wish you wellIt may have been true only for my type of cancer (non-Hodgkin’s Lymphoma) but my oncologist told me that how my body reacted to my first chemo pretty much was how the rest of the treatments would go and that turned out to be true for me.  But, I do not want to give you false info so….best wishes.  Wow – your treatments are long. – 6 hrs.  That is like the NHL patients who do not tolerate Rituxan well so the treatments can be 6-7 hours.  Looks like you made your decision and have a good plan in place. Let us know how Sunday goes for you – fingers crossed.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,364
Registered: ‎09-23-2011

Lord have mercy, Lannie. Sounds like your lungs are an orchestra. Do you have a temp?? Color of sputum?? If your not feeling better in the morning off you go to the Dr. Don't play around with this. Happy to hear you found the bandaids. I'm a paper tape freak. Love the stuff. Used it when I had to change my bandages. No irritation. That part of you sounds like your on the mend. 

Amigy, we all know how lonely it feels having cancer. Who else can help but the people who have gone through it. From diagnosis, treatments and followup we are there to support others and give tips that we've learned along the way. 

GC, I love the plan that your Dr's have mapped out for you. I would say this is all good news. 

Bow, how are you healing. UK is mother behaving??

Jxx

Contributor
Posts: 64
Registered: ‎05-06-2015

: yes but widow/widowers have a lonely experience too but are not as open or helpful with others  enduring the same experience.  Now, it may be that there are many sleazy people out there trying to take adantage of a new widow/widower which fosters almost paranoia; but, the difference between  (what I call) the fraternity of widows/widowers and the cancer patients/survivors is startling.

I experienced both in short succession and while I am a grief counselor (I did get training) my heart is with cancer patients/survivors..

I come to this group and post here far more than the postings on grief elsewhere in Wellness and other forums. I do this only because this is a group and they are disparate and not a group in my experience.

Frankly I would rather have cancer than enduring the loss of my husband, but I prefer this group...

But that is just me.

 

 .

 

Valued Contributor
Posts: 619
Registered: ‎03-10-2010
Bo,

Glad to hear you are healing well! Have the doctors suggested any other follow up testing aside from physical exams and mammograms?

Belle
Valued Contributor
Posts: 619
Registered: ‎03-10-2010
Amaivy:

For your hints for newbies:

Prepping for chemo:
Do any chores and shopping before infusion day in case you don't feel up to it on infusion day and the days to follow.
Make sure to buy bottled water to keep bedside and if you don't like water, try the Crush or Crystal Light packets that you can add to the water bottles for flavor.
Make sure to fill any prescriptions for nausea prevention and steroids so you will have them when you need them.
Stock up on some bland foods to help with nausea, such as bananas, applesauce, oatmeal, macaroni and cheese, sherbet or frozen yogurt, items containing natural ginger, etc.

Chemo day:
Pack a bag with comfort items, slippers, a soft throw, snacks, charging cord for phone, a book or journal, pens, and the like. It can be a long day.
Wear a shirt to easily access your port and to take blood pressure. I like v-neck or u-neck t-shirts best for comfort. As a large busted gal with a wide back, the button front shirts are not the most comfortable for me.
Bring a jacket or zip front hoodie in case it's chilly in the infusion room.

During chemo:
Ask for ice chips or Popsicles to suck on while receiving Adriamycin (Doxorubicin)

When I think of more, I'll send them!

Belle

Valued Contributor
Posts: 619
Registered: ‎03-10-2010
IndigoBlue:

Thanks for sharing Carolyn's story. She's a sweetie, and I'm glad she has been proclaimed cancer-free. But I am somewhat concerned that doctors are recommending mastectomy to treat DCIS, which my never become invasive. I hope that she had the BRACA test done before making this decision given her family history. I've read a lot about unnecessary treatment recommended for DCIS. Anyone else who has looked into this?

Belle
Valued Contributor
Posts: 837
Registered: ‎04-14-2010
Amaivy, I'm just curious. You speak as if you've posted here before? Forgive me but I don't remember you posting here. Of course you are most welcome to post, just trying to place you, my memory is not good. Goldie
Valued Contributor
Posts: 837
Registered: ‎04-14-2010
Belle, great tips for new chemo pts. Thanks for the info. Goldie
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,364
Registered: ‎09-23-2011

Belle, sounds like your ready for chemo again. Remember tons of water. We'll be praying that you have an easy time with this session.

Amivay, sounds you are a busy lady. Grief counseling is very difficult. God love you for doing this. It is so needed. 

I forgot who spoke about Carolyn Grace. She had more than one DCIS in her breast. Even though it is considered a non invasive breast cancer, it can reoccur and it could become invasive. That's why she had a bilateral mastectomy. Also her mother had breast cancer. She did the right thing.

Lannie, what's going on with you?? 

Jxx