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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,224
Registered: ‎01-26-2013

OP,

85% of women diagnosed with BC have no family history of it, so your side of the family with no history of it has no bearing on whether your descendants will have it or not.  I was the first in my family to have it.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,354
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@Tyak wrote:

OP,

85% of women diagnosed with BC have no family history of it, so your side of the family with no history of it has no bearing on whether your descendants will have it or not.  I was the first in my family to have it.


so was I.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 25,929
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

It seems your daughter may want to speak to her doctor about DNA testing to see if she has a genetic predisposition to breast & ovarian cancer - the same gene predisposes you to both. 

I found a lump in my breast when I was only 34 & I do have the gene - unfortunately. Every female in my Mom's family (except my mom who died in a car accident) died from either breast or ovarian cancer. When I had my hysterectomy I asked the doctor to remove my ovaries as well. He took out one but said he couldn't find the other one. I don't worry as much about the breast cancer as the ovarian because with yearly mammograms they can find the breast cancers so early now a days.

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Although there is no real scientific evidence of this and it annoys my surgeon when I say it, I believe that breast cancer has become more of a chronic disease. I had DCIS 8 1/2 years ago, had a lumpectomy and radiation as well as 5 years on Tamoxifen. Followed all instructions and had a yearly mammo and MRI so I had imaging at 6 month intervals. At my last MRI they found a ver small mass in the same breast that was cancerous again. I needed a mastectomy which I had 4 weeks ago today and working on the reconstruction. The mastectomy was needed because another lumpectomy could not be done due to the radiation I had. Cannot have radiation on same breast and chemo not required. Pill( Femara) only treatment. Same for reconstruction. The skin is not as pliable so we are not sure how much volume we can get.

 

I know about 20-30 woman who have also had breast cancer and followed all instructions given to them as far as treatment (radiation, mastectomy, chemo, oral meds) and lifestyle. All but one has had a recurrance so far.The time frame of recurrances has varied from 15 years to 2.

 

It is something us survivors have to deal with. As my oncologist just said: It's not going to kill you, you just need to monitor yourself and maintain treatment. Genetic testing is a tool but not a definative predictor of the the disease. I treat it just as treat my hypertension. It's something I have to deal with and control but will not allow it to rule or define my life. 

 

What I am trying to say is that Breast Cancer is not a death sentence. If anything it makes me appreciate what I have and has encouraged me to grab life by the b**ls and squeeze every bit of excitement, adventure, happiness and contentment and serenity from it.


'I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with an unarmed man'.......Unknown
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reiki604---first off--congrats on being mindful and then re- active to what your body is telling you and I thank god every day for our oncologists and the team that has become OUR team thru all this!!!! I totally agree with everything you posted.I am 6 years out of treatment for lobular breast cancer, stage 3 and doing very well. I opted for mastectomy , the chemo , then rads and now on my 6 th year of tamoxifin. I however, decided to have my remaining breast removed in 2016 and am not doing the recon. I am happily flat chested !!!  the key is to be aware of your body and then take care of it immediatley. Just got the ok for yearly appts with my onc dr---was going every 6 months---also--no mammos anymore for me-----Woman LOLHeart Hope your recovery is going well and all the best to you!!!

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@wagirl wrote:

reiki604---first off--congrats on being mindful and then re- active to what your body is telling you and I thank god every day for our oncologists and the team that has become OUR team thru all this!!!! I totally agree with everything you posted.I am 6 years out of treatment for lobular breast cancer, stage 3 and doing very well. I opted for mastectomy , the chemo , then rads and now on my 6 th year of tamoxifin. I however, decided to have my remaining breast removed in 2016 and am not doing the recon. I am happily flat chested !!!  the key is to be aware of your body and then take care of it immediatley. Just got the ok for yearly appts with my onc dr---was going every 6 months---also--no mammos anymore for me-----Woman LOLHeart Hope your recovery is going well and all the best to you!!!


@wagirl  thank you so much. I followed your story since its beginning. I stayed silent but admired your attitude and honesty on your treatment and recovery.  It’s a pleasure to finally meet you. We, as so many others, are sisters on this journey. 


'I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with an unarmed man'.......Unknown
Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎01-26-2013

@maestra wrote:

@Tyak wrote:

OP,

85% of women diagnosed with BC have no family history of it, so your side of the family with no history of it has no bearing on whether your descendants will have it or not.  I was the first in my family to have it.


so was I.


I hope that no one who's had it ever has to face another go-round with the beast.  I'm almost 11 years out and at my yearly exam, I always cross my fingers and say a prayer that I'm clear.

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Posts: 2,437
Registered: ‎03-13-2010

@maestra wrote:

@Tyak wrote:

OP,

85% of women diagnosed with BC have no family history of it, so your side of the family with no history of it has no bearing on whether your descendants will have it or not.  I was the first in my family to have it.


so was I.


 

So were my sister and I.  We both got it at the same age, 65!  No family history of it on either side as far back as we could go.  My genetic counselor said my daughter has no greater risk than normal. Mostly environental and other factors.  My insurance wouldn't pay for the genetic testing because there was no indication to do it.

 

However, I think it's a greater risk to get it now than it ever was before.  And it seems to be showing up younger.

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@wagirl wrote:

They are no logical reasons for someone to get cancer---I was dx in 2012 with breast cancer. No one in my family had it before me. I didn't ever smoke or drink; I managed my weight and ate healthy as well as kept moving. But there you go!!! Now my DD has to be vigilent at age 35 and will get her first mammo this year. I am very sorry about your SIL. Hopefully she caught it  early and can work toward a good outcome. 


@wagirl, My Mom passed away in June of this year from lobular breast cancer. She lived 11 months after diagnosis. She was 84, had never smoked, or drank, watched her weight, and ate a healthy diet. The cancer she had was very brutal, and fast moving. 

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tissyanne—- so very sorry to hear that. I feel very grateful but it is very painful to hear. Any cancer is brutal. My sympathies to you.