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Honored Contributor
Posts: 21,979
Registered: ‎10-03-2011

@Mindy D wrote:

@JeanLouiseFinch wrote:

I've been reading about the health benefits of bee pollen and am interested in adding it to my daily routine, but with limits. The dosing seems ambiguous. Some sources say a teaspoon of granules per day while others say anywhere from a teaspoon to a couple of tablespoons per day.  Since it contains carbs, I am only interested in a 1 teaspoon serving daily. I can make that fit in my daily carb limits, but is that really enough to provide any real benefits?

If you take bee pollen, how much do you take and how do you take it?  I'd appreciate any info you can provide,

 

Thanks


@JeanLouiseFinch @Wouldn't it vary based on whatever environment the bees are in? It could even vary seasonally. 


I'm not sure, @Mindy D . I have read that using locally sourced honey is preferred but so far, im not seeing if/where that applies to the pollen.  

Honored Contributor
Posts: 13,510
Registered: ‎05-23-2010

Re: Bee Pollen Anyone?

[ Edited ]

@JeanLouiseFinch wrote:

@Mindy D wrote:

@JeanLouiseFinch wrote:

I've been reading about the health benefits of bee pollen and am interested in adding it to my daily routine, but with limits. The dosing seems ambiguous. Some sources say a teaspoon of granules per day while others say anywhere from a teaspoon to a couple of tablespoons per day.  Since it contains carbs, I am only interested in a 1 teaspoon serving daily. I can make that fit in my daily carb limits, but is that really enough to provide any real benefits?

If you take bee pollen, how much do you take and how do you take it?  I'd appreciate any info you can provide,

 

Thanks


@JeanLouiseFinch @Wouldn't it vary based on whatever environment the bees are in? It could even vary seasonally. 


I'm not sure, @Mindy D . I have read that using locally sourced honey is preferred but so far, im not seeing if/where that applies to the pollen.  


@JeanLouiseFinch @Bee pollen is partially the pollen bees pick up. Pollen varies from plant species to plant species. Pollen contains two plant sperm in each granule. This is to enable the reproduction of each species of flowering plant.  This means different pollens, coming from differing locations filled with different plants at different times of the year would vary. The rest of the components of bee pollen come from the secretions of the bees and could also vary depending on what the bees ingest. The bees mix their saliva and nectar with the plant pollen to make the bee pollen. The composition has more than just that. 

 

 

For more exacting information I just found this study on the composition of bee pollen, including the nutritional listing of carbs. The review examined over 100 studies from around the world. 

It's entitled "Composition and functionality of bee pollen:  A review"

https://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=&ved=2ahUKEwiF5M2EqMSBAxX3mIQIHaxhA3sQ...

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,617
Registered: ‎10-02-2021

@JeanLouiseFinch wrote:

@Desertdi wrote:

POLLEN = poison for me!    I have unbelievable allergies...


Then you shouldn't take it. Neither should pregnant or breastfeeding women. 


 I'm SURE she knows that.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,441
Registered: ‎03-29-2020

Re: Bee Pollen Anyone?

[ Edited ]

are those 2 nutty women back on the air, pushing bee pollen, royal jelly, etc., again? It seems to me they got into trouble some time ago.

 

ETA: most honey sold in the US is NOT pasteurized. They can print "pasteurized" on their labels till the cows come home but that's a big fat lie. I won't eat the stuff.