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Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,403
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

This is not addressed to anyone in particular.  It saddens me when people separate mental illness from illness.  They don't get the proper care--doctor visit, therapy, and medication.  They seem to feel guilty that they have these symptoms.  Family members, who don't have knowledge about mental illness and separate it from "real" illness often look upon the person as complaining or just not straightening up and getting "over" it.

 

Our society has lagged behind in this crucial area.  Schools should address it, parents should make themselves aware of the signs and symptoms, we should all accept it as a true physical problem, and treat it as such.

 

Please try to increase your own and others' awareness of this cultural lag.  We owe it to ourselves and our children.  When we have mental illness, it should be taken seriously and treated just like we would handle a broken leg or other physical problems!!!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,901
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

@fortune wrote:

This is not addressed to anyone in particular.  It saddens me when people separate mental illness from illness.  They don't get the proper care--doctor visit, therapy, and medication.  They seem to feel guilty that they have these symptoms.  Family members, who don't have knowledge about mental illness and separate it from "real" illness often look upon the person as complaining or just not straightening up and getting "over" it.

 

Our society has lagged behind in this crucial area.  Schools should address it, parents should make themselves aware of the signs and symptoms, we should all accept it as a true physical problem, and treat it as such.

 

Please try to increase your own and others' awareness of this cultural lag.  We owe it to ourselves and our children.  When we have mental illness, it should be taken seriously and treated just like we would handle a broken leg or other physical problems!!!


BRAVA!!!!!!!!!!


'I refuse to engage in a battle of wits with an unarmed man'.......Unknown
Regular Contributor
Posts: 183
Registered: ‎03-21-2010

I would suggest prayer.  You are never alone.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 16,567
Registered: ‎06-27-2010

Re: Anxiety issues /anyone

[ Edited ]

@Reiki604 wrote:

@fortune wrote:

This is not addressed to anyone in particular.  It saddens me when people separate mental illness from illness.  They don't get the proper care--doctor visit, therapy, and medication.  They seem to feel guilty that they have these symptoms.  Family members, who don't have knowledge about mental illness and separate it from "real" illness often look upon the person as complaining or just not straightening up and getting "over" it.

 

Our society has lagged behind in this crucial area.  Schools should address it, parents should make themselves aware of the signs and symptoms, we should all accept it as a true physical problem, and treat it as such.

 

Please try to increase your own and others' awareness of this cultural lag.  We owe it to ourselves and our children.  When we have mental illness, it should be taken seriously and treated just like we would handle a broken leg or other physical problems!!!


BRAVA!!!!!!!!!!


 

             Amen, @fortune and @Reiki604!    When I entered my first inpatient psych ward experience (a 3-week program for women), so many of us were concerned about friends, co-workers, etc., finding out we were patients of psychiatric care.    I had only confided in my closest family, 2 friends, and the director at my workplace -- I didn't even want to use my insurance, thinking it would create a "bad mark" against me in my records.    I had to go in for treatment to save my life -- this much I knew.    But I felt the shame and anguish of choosing a path to healing that might, in the process, cast a dark shadow on "my reputation."    

            One of the vivid memories I have...  of many...  is of a determined, dedicated, compassionate psych nurse who took us all over to a big picture window overlooking a busy downtown avenue, sidewalks bustling with people, street filled with cars.   She pointed to all of the activity and said, "if you are worried about the opinions and stigmas placed by all those people, many of whom don't understand that tending to mental and emotional health is just as important as tending to a broken leg or a cardiac disease, remember this:   by being strong and wise enough to be here, recognizing your needs and doing the hard work to learn and heal, you are the ones who are healthy -- they, in their ignorance, are not."    

            Some of the stigma also is perpetuated by an attitude of ridicule -- even contempt -- for therapists and medications.   It's another subtle way of demeaning the importance of mental health care, and it's pervasive in social media.    I  cannot for the life of me understand why society has been so slow and so reluctant to recognize that this dreadful, unwarranted stigma takes hearts, minds and souls hostage...  and it takes precious lives, every single day, because so many people still feel an intense shame even admitting they need help.    

            God bless every one of you who lives with depression, anxiety...  with any mental health concerns...   you are worthy of respect, recognition, and effective care and healing, and you have my admiration, my support, and my prayers.   The people who try to hurt you, who try to diminish you, display their own, personal character flaws, and they do not in any way cast a shadow on you and your spirit and value.    May you find grace, understanding, and beneficial and benevolent care, and may you find at least some level of comfort in knowing you are not alone.❤️

 

⭐️Few things reveal your intellect & your generosity of spirit, the parallel powers of your heart & mind, better than how you give feedback. MPopova⭐️
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,457
Registered: ‎06-10-2015

@fortune wrote:

This is not addressed to anyone in particular.  It saddens me when people separate mental illness from illness.  They don't get the proper care--doctor visit, therapy, and medication.  They seem to feel guilty that they have these symptoms.  Family members, who don't have knowledge about mental illness and separate it from "real" illness often look upon the person as complaining or just not straightening up and getting "over" it.

 

Our society has lagged behind in this crucial area.  Schools should address it, parents should make themselves aware of the signs and symptoms, we should all accept it as a true physical problem, and treat it as such.

 

Please try to increase your own and others' awareness of this cultural lag.  We owe it to ourselves and our children.  When we have mental illness, it should be taken seriously and treated just like we would handle a broken leg or other physical problems!!!


It's also a grave mistake to assume mental illness in the face of what is likely a response to circumstance and after-effects of sedation.

 

I don't hear anxiety in the OP's plaint. I hear irritation--not the same--and I hear anger. 

 

The OP finds the sound of the A/C annoying and is vexed by the sound it's making when it's not actually cooling. She could try switching her A/C setting to "energy saving" and see if it shut off when the compressor stopped running. This just turns off the fan and actually doesn't save much energy, but it might provide her a respite from the sound. Earplugs are another solution, if the A/C is absolutely necessary.

 

The OP is nearing 80 and is recently widowed. The old age (and that's what it is, let's stop moving the needle on reality) combined with the trauma of bereavement can knock you off your moorings and make you cranky, at minimum.That is not mental illness.

 

Both old age and widowhood change life irrevocably and take a great deal of adjustment. Change isn't something most people welcome, especially change they can't control. Counseling, an in-person widow's support group (in addition to online boards, if they help), and possibly medication could help her through some of it while she gets her bearings. Regular exercise, even just a daily half-hour walk, is vital.

 

One thing the OP needs to do is start eating properly. Lack of nourishment is going to make it far harder for her to cope with everything. She should seek professional help with that if she cannot make herself eat more. That, frankly, is the most pressing issue that I see here. A doctor could help her with some mild sleep medication if counseling, support groups, and exerise don't improve her sleeping.

 

Her relationship with her son seems troubled. She says he "is resenting all this" (don't know what that encompasses) although he does help, but the OP resents him for not doing more for her. A frank discussion between the two of them seems in order, to clarify needs, assumptions, and limits.

 

Time itself helps, but I look at these major life changes the way I did my neighbor's hip replacement. I knew we had a window of time in which to do her daily therapeutic exercises if we were to maximize her range of motion and overall health in the future. She did them every day, with my help. She did the work, but really needed the support to do it. Time alone would have healed the bones, but because she put the work in at the right time, she wound up with great range of motion and a complete recovery.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 16,567
Registered: ‎06-27-2010

Re: Anxiety issues /anyone

[ Edited ]

noodleann wrote:

fortune wrote:

This is not addressed to anyone in particular.  It saddens me when people separate mental illness from illness.  They don't get the proper care--doctor visit, therapy, and medication.  They seem to feel guilty that they have these symptoms.  Family members, who don't have knowledge about mental illness and separate it from "real" illness often look upon the person as complaining or just not straightening up and getting "over" it.

 

Our society has lagged behind in this crucial area.  Schools should address it, parents should make themselves aware of the signs and symptoms, we should all accept it as a true physical problem, and treat it as such.

 

Please try to increase your own and others' awareness of this cultural lag.  We owe it to ourselves and our children.  When we have mental illness, it should be taken seriously and treated just like we would handle a broken leg or other physical problems!!!


It's also a grave mistake to assume mental illness in the face of what is likely a response to circumstance and after-effects of sedation.

 

I don't hear anxiety in the OP's plaint. I hear irritation--not the same--and I hear anger. 

 

The OP finds the sound of the A/C annoying and is vexed by the sound it's making when it's not actually cooling. She could try switching her A/C setting to "energy saving" and see if it shut off when the compressor stopped running. This just turns off the fan and actually doesn't save much energy, but it might provide her a respite from the sound. Earplugs are another solution, if the A/C is absolutely necessary.

 

The OP is nearing 80 and is recently widowed. The old age (and that's what it is, let's stop moving the needle on reality) combined with the trauma of bereavement can knock you off your moorings and make you cranky, at minimum.That is not mental illness.

 

Both old age and widowhood change life irrevocably and take a great deal of adjustment. Change isn't something most people welcome, especially change they can't control. Counseling, an in-person widow's support group (in addition to online boards, if they help), and possibly medication could help her through some of it while she gets her bearings. Regular exercise, even just a daily half-hour walk, is vital.

 

One thing the OP needs to do is start eating properly. Lack of nourishment is going to make it far harder for her to cope with everything. She should seek professional help with that if she cannot make herself eat more. That, frankly, is the most pressing issue that I see here. A doctor could help her with some mild sleep medication if counseling, support groups, and exerise don't improve her sleeping.

 

Her relationship with her son seems troubled. She says he "is resenting all this" (don't know what that encompasses) although he does help, but the OP resents him for not doing more for her. A frank discussion between the two of them seems in order, to clarify needs, assumptions, and limits.

 

Time itself helps, but I look at these major life changes the way I did my neighbor's hip replacement. I knew we had a window of time in which to do her daily therapeutic exercises if we were to maximize her range of motion and overall health in the future. She did them every day, with my help. She did the work, but really needed the support to do it. Time alone would have healed the bones, but because she put the work in at the right time, she wound up with great range of motion and a complete recovery.


 

 

            That's a wonderfully helpful and insightful post, @noodleann.    In fact, I always find your posts to be especially interesting, articulate, and perceptive.   Frankly, I don't think you and @fortune and I are in disagreement.    Each case is different, and many of us have suggested a check to be sure the surgery didn't trigger this upset or that other physiological medical issues might not be at play.   Mental illness can be short-term or chronic and persistent, and it often is overlooked or dismissed as insignificant (not by you...  but by many).    I think a point to always consider is the fact that we need to treat the whole person -- mind, body, and spirit -- without stigma placed on the mental/emotional health component.      And also that even the intricacies of the relationship issues with @halfpint1's son might be better understood and managed with the guidance and objectivity of a professional -- unfortunately, we fallible human beings aren't always equipped with the best tools to wend our way successfully through the maze of interpersonal imbroglios.  

 

⭐️Few things reveal your intellect & your generosity of spirit, the parallel powers of your heart & mind, better than how you give feedback. MPopova⭐️
Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,403
Registered: ‎03-14-2010

What wonderful people we have on our boards!!!  I prefer to think of anxiety as a symptom.  Shortness of breath, headaches, pain in the right side, blurred vision--are all symptoms.  If we leave out the "mental" part, it all makes perfect sense.  Society needs to catch up to this way of defining illness.  With this acceptance, we can live happier lives and address equally all the facets of "illness."

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,202
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Why does it have to be a mental issue, Maybe I really hear something and can't figutre it out, Ir could  be something making noise even if it is said to be impossible for people checked it out and they  know. It is said it couldn't be a fan for it died.  Should I just accept I am nuts--it would be easier. 

Valued Contributor
Posts: 909
Registered: ‎12-18-2012

@halfpint1  Forgive me if I missed something, but, could you have ringing in your ears?

I have it and it can be distracting.  Do you hear the noise over the radio or the TV?

If you stick your finger in your ear can you hear it? 

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 85
Registered: ‎12-26-2013

@halfpint1 wrote:

Why does it have to be a mental issue, Maybe I really hear something and can't figutre it out, Ir could  be something making noise even if it is said to be impossible for people checked it out and they  know. It is said it couldn't be a fan for it died.  Should I just accept I am nuts--it would be easier. 


 

With all due respect you said you're not eating or sleeping and you asked about anxiety issues. Posters read what you said & they tried to be kind and help in a kind way.

Please don't call people with mental health issues "nuts". The stigma is already very very hard for us.