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Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,638
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

We traveled 140 mile round trip to get our Pre Ck certification.  It came quickly.  However then the fun began.  Yes, we did not have to take off shoes, or coats, etc. But hubby has a pacemaker so his was sent to the "regular" line to be scanned and then patted down.  What was to be quick and easy ended up taking 15 extra minutes.  The same happened to those with knee and hip replacements.  So  much for TSA Pre .

 

Does anyone see an advantage to getting this Pre Ck if you have some sort of implant surgery that seems to negate the reason you get this service in the first place.  It is $85 a person.  It would seem that TSA would have a fix.  I know each airport if different.  We fly out of BWI Baltimore. 

Contributor
Posts: 55
Registered: ‎07-11-2015

I have a knee replacement too & Global Entry ( which is like Pre TSA) only for both Domestic & International flying....you need to tell them about the Pacemaker or Replacements before going through the line & go to the Glass House, that is what I call it.  It closes & shows everything in your body, it is fast & you can keep your shoes on.  I hope this helps you for your next flight!  I just went through this a couple of months ago.

Good Luck!  🍀 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,843
Registered: ‎04-14-2013

You'll probably be glad it's done, on the day you depart.  Just more convenient and less stressful than waiting with the rest of the crowd, when that extra 15 minutes can leave you wondering if you're going to board in time.

 

I have a ceramic joint implant, and I've usually walked right through the screener, though one time an agent stopped me and pressed right on it - I said, yes, I've got one, and she said yes, I thought so - and I walked on.

 

Happy Trails!

Cogito ergo sum
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 6,442
Registered: ‎02-07-2011

I don't have anything metal in my body and I get through security very quickly.  I travel several times a year and even if I didn't the $85 (which is good for 5 years) is a bargain and IMO very well worth it.  Just not having to take off shoes, separating toiletries, etc etc makes it less stressful.

 

 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,688
Registered: ‎05-15-2014

This is interesting.  I have friends who have the Global Entry and we have considered doing it also but haven't yet.  They swear by it.   We fly often and we always usually end up with TSV pre check on our boarding passes anyway.

Super Contributor
Posts: 270
Registered: ‎12-28-2017

I have been automatically assigned to pre-check without having to pay for it (on the past 6 flights I have taken), and I loved it - no taking shoes off, no having to take my laptop out of my bag.   I heard that the TSA is disappointed that not as many people as they thought would opt to purchase the TSA pre-check plan, so when you check-in to your flight on-line or at a kiosk, they will sometimes assign it to you to keep the security lines moving.  OK by me, as I have benefited from it! 

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,048
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

@LindaSal I just got Global Entry last year and used it for the first time in November.  Was a breeze to get through security- no lines, etc.  but, I still had to wait for my checked bag, so didn’t really save any time.  My upcoming domestic flight should hopefully show as pre-check, but I understand that it’s not always a given.

 

 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,327
Registered: ‎05-09-2016

wrote:

@LindaSal I just got Global Entry last year and used it for the first time in November.  Was a breeze to get through security- no lines, etc.  but, I still had to wait for my checked bag, so didn’t really save any time.  My upcoming domestic flight should hopefully show as pre-check, but I understand that it’s not always a given.

 

 

 


@Alter Ego 

If you have Global Entry, it includes PreCheck when traveling domestically in the US. 

~The more someone needs to brag about how wonderful, special, successful, wealthy or important they are, the greater the likelihood that it isn't true. ~

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,327
Registered: ‎05-09-2016

When TSA PreCheck was first implemented, it was a "test" program targeted at elite level frequent flyers on Delta, American and United. Then they started randomly giving it to other travelers, sometimes on the boarding pass, sometimes at the checkpoint. 

 

In 2015, I got an email from Delta that the test program was ending and there wouldn't be any free PreCheck for anyone. If you wanted it, you had to pay for it. I thought it was well worth the money, so I paid for it and went for my interview with a local rent-a-cop who could've doubled as Paul Blart, Mall Cop.

 

Then the TSA started back pedaling and said they'd phase out the free PreCheck in 2016. Then it was 2017. If and when it really happens....who knows? As someone who paid for it, it's irritating to see people who are infrequent flyers and and have little or no idea what to do in the security line end up in the PreCheck line. That was part of the entire premise, to target frequent travelers and speed up the process. 

~The more someone needs to brag about how wonderful, special, successful, wealthy or important they are, the greater the likelihood that it isn't true. ~

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,048
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

wrote:



@Alter Ego 

If you have Global Entry, it includes PreCheck when traveling domestically in the US. 


I understand that’s what’s supposed to happen (and I assume it will) but I read some people’s experience is that it’s not absolute. I’m fine either way.