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Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,412
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime

Anyone watch this 4 part series?  I watched all 4 episodes yesterday afternoon.

 

All I can say is yowza.  

I don't know why I watched.  I have never purchased any of their clothing.  I don't know anyone who has been a consultant or seller.

 

It was certainly eye opening.  


Why is it, when I have a 50/50 guess at something, I'm always 100% wrong?
Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,843
Registered: ‎05-05-2010

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime

I haven't watched it yet.  I did read an article that pointed out that the documentary skirted the issue of the sweatshop conditions the clothes were made under. 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,971
Registered: ‎11-24-2013

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime

I have a young in-law relative who sold this stuff a few years ago. Fortunately when things started going downhill she was able to get out of the whole mess.

 

I always thought this outfit sounded sketchy.

Super Contributor
Posts: 309
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime

[ Edited ]

Yes.  I stumbled upon it through TikTok.  One of the contributors and former consultant, Roberta Blevins, does extensive content on MLM companies and particularly on LuLaRoe.  She "analyzes" other MLM companies too, of course they're pretty much all bad according to her.  I respect her opinion and understand her aversion to MLM's, based on her personal experience.  Some companies are more aggressive than others when it comes to the "culty" behavior mentioned. I know a few former LuLaRoe consultants, not well enough to discuss their personal financials, but I knew the initial investment was BIG and they basically made it a way of life and spent everything they had trying to "get rich" selling clothing.  None of them made the money the top performers allegedly did.  Certainly not for lack of hustle, it's just not a very profitable way to run a business unless you're at the top of the pyramid, thus the pyramid scheme taboo.  

 

I've personally been involved with a few through the years, mostly to get the discount for myself, so I never felt taken advantage of.  I never treated them as a business and intended to make money from them.  I try not to be that "friend" that is constantly advertising my "business" on social media.  I find that behavior very alienating, even though that's what sales is about I guess.....

~~Keep calm and hug your pets~~
Valued Contributor
Posts: 982
Registered: ‎03-06-2020

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime

[ Edited ]

LuLaRoe was once known for AMAZING leggings. I mean, they wore like iron. I own a few pairs in black. The person I know started with them when they first started in the area she was living (East Coast). They started out very differently then they are now. I remember going to her home (party like situation) and everyone was trying on items, ordering, etc. Colors were basic, mix and match, no weird prints and the quality was top notch. For young moms, they were great play ground/at home wear and for those career types (me back then), great gym, leisure clothes.

 

I don't know when it changed but 1) getting just black leggings became near impossible and 2) when you did, they were ******. She had so many complaints, that she got out of the buisness and that was that.

 

Fast forward: a couple of years ago, there was a friend of hers who went on YouTube and sold her items but then documented the nightmare the company became and her attempt to get out while being owed about $15,000 from the company. You can see her and others discuss this on YouTube today, if you wish. FYI: JUST to sign up with the BASIC package was $5000 years ago; it's only gone up since.

 

What angers me (and I don't know if the docu shows this since I don't get Amazon Prime), is that company targeted Military spouces and young stay at home moms because 1) they needed the money so badly so it sounded like a GREAT way to income and 2) because these 2 groups are usually in rural/isolated areas with no family or close friends around so no one to talk them OUT of it. Again, the stories on YouTube of those who are still trying to get thousands back, have sued, have come together to get out of this are heartbreaking. 

 

Disgusting company and those who recruited using lies are just as bad. Eye opener indeed.

"Coming to ya from Florida"
Honored Contributor
Posts: 14,172
Registered: ‎03-11-2010

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime


@gidgetgh wrote:

Anyone watch this 4 part series?  I watched all 4 episodes yesterday afternoon.

 

All I can say is yowza.  

I don't know why I watched.  I have never purchased any of their clothing.  I don't know anyone who has been a consultant or seller.

 

It was certainly eye opening.  


started to watch, but bailed,  

New Contributor
Posts: 2
Registered: ‎07-05-2012

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime

[ Edited ]

You're absolutely correct.  They targeted military wives and young stay at home moms.  They made it seem like it was one big, happy family.  Over the few years when it started to explode with so many consultants, things changed.  It became a pyramid scheme to the top money makers, because they were closer to the top, they recruited a ton of people and were making money off of these "downlines" selling the goods.   They weren't even selling anymore because they were making good money off of their bonus' - a pyramid scheme.  The thing that got me is that you never knew what patterns you were going to get in a box.  You could end up with ****** no one wanted and you were stuck with it, but were told to order more.  The people who started it reminded me so much of Jim and Tammy Faye Baker.  They just oozed scam to me while making it seem like this was the next best thing to sliced bread.  The husband is a bold faced liar and denies everything.  If you can watch it, do, it's unbelievable.  I mean, I understand MLMs and Pyramid schemes, but getting a true inside look is "WOW" with former consultants being interviewed. I can't stand MLMs and how LuLaRoe got so big with those ugly patterns, still baffles me.

 

My daughter in law's sister sells Isagenix and it cracks me up because all these MLMs have the same "speak".  "Life is great and it's all because I can work from home and be with my children and make so much money.  Every good thing in my life is because of Isagenix.  I'm so healthy and can lose weight so easily because of Isagenix.  Why don't you join me!!!"  I had to unfollow her on Facebook because I couldn't take the photoshopped/filtered to the hilt pictures of herself and the constant "best company ever, you should join me" speil!!!

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 116
Registered: ‎06-08-2021

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime

I don't care for those gaudy, loud prints. When I wear leggings I prefer black or at least a solid color.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,988
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime


@gidgetgh wrote:

Anyone watch this 4 part series?  I watched all 4 episodes yesterday afternoon.

 

All I can say is yowza.  

I don't know why I watched.  I have never purchased any of their clothing.  I don't know anyone who has been a consultant or seller.

 

It was certainly eye opening.  


I love to watch documentaries on Amazon. That one was definately a yowza.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 10,412
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: LuLaRoe documentary- Amazon Prime


@Kaia2009 wrote:

You're absolutely correct.  They targeted military wives and young stay at home moms.  They made it seem like it was one big, happy family.  Over the few years when it started to explode with so many consultants, things changed.  It became a pyramid scheme to the top money makers, because they were closer to the top, they recruited a ton of people and were making money off of these "downlines" selling the goods.   They weren't even selling anymore because they were making good money off of their bonus' - a pyramid scheme.  The thing that got me is that you never knew what patterns you were going to get in a box.  You could end up with ****** no one wanted and you were stuck with it, but were told to order more.  The people who started it reminded me so much of Jim and Tammy Faye Baker.  They just oozed scam to me while making it seem like this was the next best thing to sliced bread.  The husband is a bold faced liar and denies everything.  If you can watch it, do, it's unbelievable.  I mean, I understand MLMs and Pyramid schemes, but getting a true inside look is "WOW" with former consultants being interviewed. I can't stand MLMs and how LuLaRoe got so big with those ugly patterns, still baffles me.

 

My daughter in law's sister sells Isagenix and it cracks me up because all these MLMs have the same "speak".  "Life is great and it's all because I can work from home and be with my children and make so much money.  Every good thing in my life is because of Isagenix.  I'm so healthy and can lose weight so easily because of Isagenix.  Why don't you join me!!!"  I had to unfollow her on Facebook because I couldn't take the photoshopped/filtered to the hilt pictures of herself and the constant "best company ever, you should join me" speil!!!



@Kaia2009 - yes, that's exactly who they reminded me of. Tammy Faye and Jim Bakker.


Why is it, when I have a 50/50 guess at something, I'm always 100% wrong?