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Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,629
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: FUN DISCUSSION OF FILM NOIR

I love your enthusiasm and intellectual curiosity, @MarnieRez3 !   I do want to add a caveat that I actually did not like the novel-- he was so relentlessly bleak, with such a dire world view, that I found him extremely hard to stay with.  Would love to hear your assessment once you read it!

 

@NAES1,  I knew he was from the South (Virginia, I think?) but not the extent to which they tried to eradicate his accent! Fascinating.  In roles where he WAS playing a southerner, he always had a rich, wonderful accent, so he sure knew how to roll it back out!

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,380
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: FUN DISCUSSION OF FILM NOIR


@NAES1 wrote:

 

                      'Shadow of a Doubt'  

 

         ''ONE of the _best_ movies, ever'' !

 

           I definitely agree with Oznell-

 

...........................also, one of my top 10 favorites. 

            Each time, I always noticed something I missed before.

 

  Suspense, mystery, riveting, fascinating - total innocence of what a perfect hometown neighborhood was. 

 

  Suspicious alarms going off throughout the movie . No one else had touched on this due to the foolish nature of an infatuation, so in honor, of a family member, their heads were in the clouds~!

 

    Did anyone know that Joseph Cotton had a home grown spoken southern accent so mentally powerful, he was refused acting roles?

He had to have a course of drive, while compelled with departing from any accent evidence from any known southern pitch.

 

    Cotton had to take continuous pressured coach voice lessons, for over a year, to develop a ( exclusive ) new intonation so that he could report in .....

` before he could have any serious character roles in grand old Hollywood to work. 

 

 There was not one actor in this movie that I thought miscast.

 

 @Oznell 

 @roeroe1005  ~ definitely a film noir, plus~~ 


Hi @NAES1  I once read that Shadow of a Doubt was filmed in Sanata Rosa, CA. Hitchcock said it was the perfect town for the movie.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 11,415
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: FUN DISCUSSION OF FILM NOIR

Hi @Judaline 

Santa Rosa is a lovely town.  It's the capital of Sonoma County, the site of so many northern California fires recently..  It also has one of the few remaining live broadcast smooth jazz radio stations in the country. I do think, though, that they've added a lot of earlier music from the likes of like Frank Sinatra, Ella Fitzgerald, and others perhaps for the listening pleasure of many of the retirement communities in the area.

[was Homegirl] Love to be home . . . thus the screen name. Joined 2003.
Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,380
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: FUN DISCUSSION OF FILM NOIR

[ Edited ]

Well, I just watched the film clip, @Oznell . It was mostly  Dlck Powell, wasn't it? I thought he was a much better tough guy than he was a singer. Don't send me hate mail! It's just my opinion! He was great. I don't think I could watch the two movies yet-too familiar having just seen them.

 

I loved the noctournes played throughout. I get chills alllll over my body when I hear them. Mostly sax I think but at the end in the credits there was a mean trumpet playing. It went fast but I think it said it was written just for Murder My Sweet. Great sound.

 

Once again, thanks. Always a pleasure Smiley Happy 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 18,629
Registered: ‎11-08-2014

Re: FUN DISCUSSION OF FILM NOIR

Aw, sweet @Judaline ,  I know what you're saying, but.... the fact that D i c k was so surprisingly good in his later noir career doesn't mean he wasn't adorable as everybody's favorite boy singer in the Thirties, does it?  It's the fact that he could do both seemingly disparate things well that throws me off a bit.  Talent!

 

He's completely assured in both contexts.  Look at him working the stage in this "I've Got My Love to Keep Me Warm" number, with Alice Faye coming in a the end:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LRmGYCwsPpM

 

Then, I love the Depression-era naive tenderness with Ruby Keeler, in "I Only Have Eyes for You"  These two make me think of my parents:

 

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BhVeQV5HBbc

 

 

 

 

Honored Contributor
Posts: 17,380
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: FUN DISCUSSION OF FILM NOIR

Very cute, @Oznell . Ruby and Alice Faye were both before my time. But I remember kids in school all talking about Alice Faye. Apparently my parents didn't like her-never heard her name mentioned in my household. lol. Yes, Dlck was very versatile. As he sang I was waiting for him to bust out with a Philip Marlowe remark. Wouldn't that be something? A singing detective. I once saw a play in London with exactly that-a singing detective. He was played by Roger Allam. Boy, can that guy sing. I know him more as a detective on a couple of PBS shows! Thanks for the cute videos.