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Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,844
Registered: ‎05-24-2010

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations


@CalminHeart wrote:

Which pronunciation is correct? Upper east coast? Deep south? Midwest? Southwest? Northwest?  

 

I can drive 2 hours south and hear an entirely different dialect and pronunciation of words.  

 

I've traveled to 47 states and people in every one of them have a different way of pronouncing some words. 

 

Let it go. You can't do anything about it.


I agree with you @CalminHeart it is dialect for the most part. I also think there are just some words a lot of us can't pronounce for a variety of reasons. 

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 78
Registered: ‎09-08-2010

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations

I doubt that anyone posting here or even living on this Earth, perhaps, uses perfect pronunciation on every word out of their mouth.  Until the critics here have spent hours speaking on live television - you haven't walked in their shoes.  Good grief - with all that is going on in the world - count your blessings - not other peoples minor errors.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,541
Registered: ‎03-16-2010

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations


@proudlyfromNJ wrote:

@luvmybeetle wrote:

I think the word button is a regional thing.  I've noticed that when someone is from the Northeast they pronounce the word as bu-on.  Maybe someone from the NE could chime in on this.  It's how your tongue hits the roof of your mouth differently than we who are from the Central part of the country.  


@luvmybeetle  I'm from NJ and live in NY. I pronounce but un. I pronounce the T. I have never heard it pronounced without the T.


I'm from NY and That's the way I say it too but un.   I never heard it pronounced with a T either.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,849
Registered: ‎03-12-2010

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations

@KKJ 

There is a host who frequently is on air with unkempt hair.  It makes me wonder if she has a brush and comb.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 27,293
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations


@ScarletDove wrote:

The word that gets me every time by both host and/or vendor is "button"...amazing how many people are not aware there are 2 "t's" in the word "button"...I laugh every time I hear the pronunciation "bu..on"   where are the missing "t's"...?  Smiley LOLSmiley LOL


@ScarletDove That's a generational thing.  Like "did'n'tuh". The make 3 syllables out of it.  

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,892
Registered: ‎07-16-2021

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations

I am convinced that no one coaches anyone before they go on the air. They expect them to know how to pronounce things. It does seem like if brands or other words like colors are unusual names they would highlight them on their cue cards, at the very least.

Trusted Contributor
Posts: 1,629
Registered: ‎03-02-2016

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations

Yes, very annoying when hosts can't pronounce words correctly. QVC needs to hire an English/speech/pronunciation coach for their hosts. They are paid professionals. They should at the very minimum know how to pronounce the vendor's name and product correctly.

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 86
Registered: ‎10-27-2019

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations

[ Edited ]

On today's ITKWD presentation of the Calphalon skillets (which was actually being hosted by Mary), the vendor explained that Calphalon has "withstanded" the test of time.  What?

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,929
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations


@Glitzy wrote:
Recently, the words “merino” and “koolaburra “ were mispronounced by host for entire hour. Hard to watch.

And still, I survived.

Honored Contributor
Posts: 8,929
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Teach hosts correct pronunciations


@ScarletDove wrote:

The word that gets me every time by both host and/or vendor is "button"...amazing how many people are not aware there are 2 "t's" in the word "button"...I laugh every time I hear the pronunciation "bu..on"   where are the missing "t's"...?  Smiley LOLSmiley LOL


The pronunciation is a localism; presumably the host heard the word said that way from early childhood.

 

In the territory in which it is used, the pronunciation of /t/ with the tongue just above the teeth would be considered unusual.

 

The manner of production is called a "glottal stop".