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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,760
Registered: ‎07-02-2015

Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier

[ Edited ]

From the Associated Press.........

 

Georgia's signature sweet onions may be a little smaller and a little more expensive this year.

 

Vidalia onions are scheduled to begin shipping on April 19, arriving in stores in the following days.

 

Farmer Aries Haygood told WMAZ-TV that cooler-than-normal weather has stunted onion growth, meaning the average onion may only be 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) around instead of 4 inches (10 centimeters).

 

Haygood, the chairman of the Vidalia Onion Committee, said there will be plenty of Georgia-grown onions. But he said prices may be a little higher because sweet onion farmers in Texas were hit hard by a winter storm there.

 

“If the total demand of the product goes up, you may see a change at the retail level,” said Haygood, who owns a 375-acre (150-hectare) onion farm. “Usually you’re talking nickels and dimes per pound.”

 

The Vidalia Onion Festival is scheduled for April 22 through 25.

Esteemed Contributor
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Registered: ‎04-14-2013

Re: Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier

Yum!  Love Vidalias.  As long as they are as sweet I guess I am happy to pay more if at least they're available.  Thanks for the info, though.  I can avoid sticker shock!

 

(I have to admit, though, lately I've re-discovered red onions.)

Cogito ergo sum
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Posts: 1,776
Registered: ‎04-02-2015

Re: Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier


@novamc1 wrote:

rom the Associated Press.........

 

Georgia’s signature sweet onions may be a little smaller and a little more expensive this year.

 

Vidalia onions are scheduled to begin shipping on April 19, arriving in stores in the following days.

 

Farmer Aries Haygood told WMAZ-TV that cooler-than-normal weather has stunted onion growth, meaning the average onion may only be 3 inches (7.6 centimeters) around instead of 4 inches (10 centimeters).

 

Haygood, the chairman of the Vidalia Onion Committee, said there will be plenty of Georgia-grown onions. But he said prices may be a little higher because sweet onion farmers in Texas were hit hard by a winter storm there.

 

“If the total demand of the product goes up, you may see a change at the retail level,” said Haygood, who owns a 375-acre (150-hectare) onion farm. “Usually you’re talking nickels and dimes per pound.”

 

The Vidalia Onion Festival is scheduled for April 22 through 25.


I ordered mine from him and they were the same price. . Is he the A and M Farms, Ive been ordering from him, and he now says he and his wife own the Farm.  I think they start shipping April 26. Been dealing with him for 4 years and he always emails me when his last shipment in the summer will go out, and then I have them for all winter too. He's a very nice man to talk too, and always thanks me for buying from him.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,206
Registered: ‎08-08-2011

Re: Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier

I bought a Vidalia onion at the store yesterday and I noticed how small they were.  I don’t know where they were grown though. 

Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎07-02-2015

Re: Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier

[ Edited ]

@itsmagic 

 

If you bought  a genuine Vidalia onion, you would know it was actually grown in one of the Georgia counties officially designated as Vidalia-growing country.   Each onion either has a sticker saying "Vidalia" or comes in a bag labeled Vidalia.

 

It has something to do with the particular soil and other factors in that region of the state.

 

Onions grown elsewhere cannot legally carry that name. Vidalias haven't  been shipped to stores yet, supposedly.

 

I saw some very attractive "sweet yellow onions" at Kroger yesterday in a bag labeled Peruvian Gold.  They looked good, but I didn't need a whole bag, so am holding out for Vidalias to arrive in stores later this month.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,206
Registered: ‎08-08-2011

Re: Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier


@novamc1 wrote:

@itsmagic 

 

If you bought  a genuine Vidalia onion, you would know it was actually grown in one of the Georgia counties officially designated as Vidalia-growing country.   Each onion either has a sticker saying "Vidalia" or comes in a bag labeled Vidalia.

 

It has something to do with the particular soil and other factors in that region of the state.

 

Onions grown elsewhere cannot legally carry that name. Vidalias haven't  been shipped to stores yet, supposedly.

 

I saw some very attractive "sweet yellow onions" at Kroger yesterday in a bag labeled Peruvian Gold.  They looked good, but I didn't need a whole bag, so am holding out for Vidalias to arrive in stores later this month.


Thank you for posting this. I had no idea - I thought that was what I was buying but I just went to my cupboard and removed the tiny label on it and it was grown in Texas and says “ Lone Star Sweet”.  So it is not a Vidalia but I’m at least glad to see it was grown in the USA.  😁

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Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier

Groups like the Shriners sell Vidalias in 10 lb. bags as a fundraiser.  I go through 30-40 lbs a year between neighbors and a lot of oniony cooking.  I'm just hoping they are available this way so I don't have to lug them home from the grocery store.  This is one of the highlights of my year, that's how much I love these babies.

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Posts: 12,542
Registered: ‎02-27-2012

Re: Sweet Georgia, Texas onions may be smaller, costlier

Gosh @depglass   I didn't know onions could last that long!  I use about 5-6 large ones / week but don't think I could use up 10 lbs. before they got soft and mushy.

 

I store them in an open bin in my dark pantry.

 

Would you mind sharing how you store them?

 

TIA!