Reply
Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,094
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

(No, this is not an alien invasion food. {#emotions_dlg.biggrin})

It's a wonderful Bavarian, actually Schwabian, large ravioli that is traditionally cut into strips, then fried with onions, bacon, and other likable add-ins depending on your preference. Slightly beaten eggs (Ei) are then gently added and stirred. The skillet is allowed to sit on the fire, while the eggs firm up a bit.

We now live in a city with a wonderful German butcher, market and deli all in one and they sell Schwabische Maltauchen. Though we've done our homework on the net, we've love to hear from anyone who has a family recipe for using this large Bavarian ravioli (not how to make them).

Thanks so much in advance!

Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,319
Registered: ‎10-21-2011

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

You're making me homesick (Heimweh.) I prefer the Maultaschen cooked up in broth, but I've had them sauteed with egg as you decribe.

If you can read German, there is a fine book with good recipes for Maultaschen by Gerd Ohnsorg, and you can also look for the very good GU cooking series in any buchladen.

I can give you my recipe which is to get some really good light beef broth (Kraftbruhe) or even chicken broth, heat up the maultaschen in it. Easy-peasy. Probably one of my favorite German dishes of any of them.

Another way I like them is simply sauteed in butter with chopped onion.

If you get a chance to find "Schupfnuedeln mit Sauerkraut" usually at a street fair in Schwaben and it's a torpedo-shaped potato and flour dumpling sauteed until browned and then mixed with bacon-flavored sauerkraut. For some reason, it tastes incredible outdoors and never good made inside. I have no idea why.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,584
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

Reminds me of Haluski.

Frequent Contributor
Posts: 108
Registered: ‎03-08-2011

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

We were in Germany for a few years and I absolutely lived on maultaschen! I use to go to the same restaurant and I didn't even need to order - our waitress knew what I wanted. I also lived on ice coffee (with ice cream)! When we returned to the states I ordered ice coffee and that's exactly what I got - a cup of coffee with ice cubes in it! I picked up several German cookbooks and now I'm wondering if I have a recipe for maultaschen. Oh, I am starving now!! I also really liked paprika chicken.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,094
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

On 3/7/2015 Campion said:

You're making me homesick (Heimweh.) I prefer the Maultaschen cooked up in broth, but I've had them sauteed with egg as you decribe.

If you can read German, there is a fine book with good recipes for Maultaschen by Gerd Ohnsorg, and you can also look for the very good GU cooking series in any buchladen.

I can give you my recipe which is to get some really good light beef broth (Kraftbruhe) or even chicken broth, heat up the maultaschen in it. Easy-peasy. Probably one of my favorite German dishes of any of them.

Another way I like them is simply sauteed in butter with chopped onion.

If you get a chance to find "Schupfnuedeln mit Sauerkraut" usually at a street fair in Schwaben and it's a torpedo-shaped potato and flour dumpling sauteed until browned and then mixed with bacon-flavored sauerkraut. For some reason, it tastes incredible outdoors and never good made inside. I have no idea why.


Campion,

Thank you so much for taking the time to share such wonderful information! We've not had it in a broth, but it certainly sound like a wonderful cold weather meal with a hearty loaf of bread and salad. And, since both DH and I speak some German, he more than I, I'm going to see if I can procure Herr Ohnsorg's book. Can't wait to get my hands on it. (I don't know why my maternal grandfather didn't teach us more German than he did. Grrrr.)

Our first trip to Germany was in 1980. When we made our way to Munich, our rather small hotel was around the corner from a bistro located downstairs from the street level - so cozy. At my husband's urging, I ordered this dish and came back every evening while in Munich so I could enjoy it again and again.

Thanks, again, Campion.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,094
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

On 3/7/2015 traveler said:

Reminds me of Haluski.


traveler,

Am curious: is this a large Polish ravioli type dish? Or Russian or from any of the Balkan states? Am only acquainted with pelmeni, which are small Russian ravioli, served most often in a broth with a small blop of sour cream on top.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,094
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

On 3/7/2015 Ladybug1124 said:

We were in Germany for a few years and I absolutely lived on maultaschen! I use to go to the same restaurant and I didn't even need to order - our waitress knew what I wanted. I also lived on ice coffee (with ice cream)! When we returned to the states I ordered ice coffee and that's exactly what I got - a cup of coffee with ice cubes in it! I picked up several German cookbooks and now I'm wondering if I have a recipe for maultaschen. Oh, I am starving now!! I also really liked paprika chicken.


Ladybug,

Oh, if you find a recipe, please come back to the forum and share! I would LOVE to make it. I ate this every evening we were in Munich and are on a search to get as close to the Munich version we had in 1980.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 3,584
Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

Haluski is the one with noodles, cabbage, bacon and extras.

Maybe I should have said pierogi.

Highlighted
Respected Contributor
Posts: 2,319
Registered: ‎10-21-2011

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

Can you believe I'd been in Germany multiple times and didn't have Maultaschen until I moved there in 1999? (I simply had been in parts where Maultaschen weren't daily food.) I think they are my favorites and yes, Eiscafe is another huge favorite. It's vanilla ice cream with cold espresso poured over it and then some whipped cream on top, served in a tall tea glass, with a spoon.

Have you had "Spaghettieis? This is extruded ice cream (pushed through a spaetzle maker) and then topped with raspberry or strawberry sauce, with "cheese" either coconut or grated white chocolate. It's a fave of kids.

German food has a bad reputation but we found German cuisine to be amazing. Of course, we were in Baden and it has a tradition of fine cuisine swiped from nearby France--snails are often on the menu. We even liked the leberknoedel (liver dumpings) and it was very hard to adjust to American food when we got home.

Esteemed Contributor
Posts: 5,094
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: Schwabische Maultauchen mit Ei

On 3/8/2015 Campion said:

Can you believe I'd been in Germany multiple times and didn't have Maultaschen until I moved there in 1999? (I simply had been in parts where Maultaschen weren't daily food.) I think they are my favorites and yes, Eiscafe is another huge favorite. It's vanilla ice cream with cold espresso poured over it and then some whipped cream on top, served in a tall tea glass, with a spoon.

Have you had "Spaghettieis? This is extruded ice cream (pushed through a spaetzle maker) and then topped with raspberry or strawberry sauce, with "cheese" either coconut or grated white chocolate. It's a fave of kids.

German food has a bad reputation but we found German cuisine to be amazing. Of course, we were in Baden and it has a tradition of fine cuisine swiped from nearby France--snails are often on the menu. We even liked the leberknoedel (liver dumpings) and it was very hard to adjust to American food when we got home.


We had S-M mit ei for dinner tonight! Oh, my, but it was so wonderful!

We've had leberknoedel soup many times in Germany and Austria and enjoyed it very much. Each time it tasted just a bit different. Have never had the ice cream dish of which you speak and that might be because most of our trips were made in the early to late spring.

We had the best trout in the Hartz Mountains and I loved the variety of German potato salads.

I will admit to staring into every bakery window for 5 minutes, salivating, then working my way in through the door and making multiple purchases. Most of the time I'd dissect my purchases before consuming them, take notes, then see if I could replicate the pastry once I returned to the U.S. Had a few successes and many failures. LOL!