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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

Knowing type's of apples, and type's of potatoes makes all the difference in the recipes. 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

Better to do that than waste money on the ingredients. Most cases though condensed is usually in a dessert, and evaporated would be used in a casserole.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

And I love that some years later that the measurements were wrong and was missing an ingredient. This was in a cookbook from "The Neeleys'. And a cookkbook from our church, one day the Pastors wife walked up and handed me about a dozen file cards of recipes in one of the church cookbooks that incorrect. I almost died on the spot. Was affraid to try any of the recipes after that. Cookbooks are on my list of "don't waste my money". I am a good cook without them. And more creative than I gave my self credit for. Just more clutter.Collecting is a bad hobby to have in most cases.At least for me.So I stay clear of them as much as possible.I due have a soft spot for unique.

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Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

Again here we go, a healthy pinch. Good luck with that.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

And I sure that never helped.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

I always read the recipe twice, to make sure I have all the ingredients, and to see if it is worth the trouble.Most time I would get a  headache and just throw out the idea of making it.at all.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

I don't think I've ever heard to use hardboiled eggs. That would be horrible to me.As I have always hated it when people put hardboiled eggs in tuna salad.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

Those were just examples of ingredients not sure of, not an actual recipe.

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,267
Registered: ‎02-09-2016

I like that, very unique.!!

Super Contributor
Posts: 283
Registered: ‎03-22-2015

I have a lot of old cookbooks, so need to rely on the internet or conversion charts for some of the old measurments like the previously mentioned can sizes. 

 

The one that makes me cringe every time is when a recipe says season "to taste" for a mixture that is still uncooked. Specifically a raw batter or raw meatball/meatloaf or rub mixture. How the heck am I supposed to know what "to taste" is when I have a big blop bacteria-filled raw goo?  Sorry, but I'm not going in for a taste until it's all cooked and takes the form of yummy food, LOL.  I just have to wing it with the seasoning before that and hope for the best.