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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

[ Edited ]

Shanus wrote:

Passover Salmon Croquettes

 

1 can salmon

1 red bell pepper

1/2 lg. onion

1 egg

1 stalk celery

Matzo Meal

 

Put the onion, celery, and red pepper in cuisinart (unless you're a martyr & like to chop by hand)

 

Put the drained salmon in a bowl, break up the pieces and add contents of cuisinart.

 

Add 1 beaten egg and enough matzo meal until it looks like it will hold together. Salt & pepper optional

 

Form mixture into patties and dredge in matzo meal (both sides). Let set in frig. for about an hour.

 

Saute in pan w/ a little canola oil and a little butter (for flavor). All ingredients are cooked so when browned evenly on both sides....Supper time!

 

 


@Shanus- this is the recipe I use to make my salmon croquettes all year long! I don't use celery because we don't like it, but otherwise, this is how my mom made it as well. I never make them as good as she did, but they're still plenty good. Thanks for sharing!

 

By the way, I just mix up the salmon with my hands. I don't throw out the bones or skin either; I just mash them up until they're so fine you don't even taste them. They're so healthy! And, I use a chopper I bought on QVC for the onions and pepper. Apparently they don't sell the model I bought anymore, but this is it:

 

http://www.qvc.com/Kuhn-Rikon-2.4-Cup-Pull-&-Chop-wExtra-Bowl-&-S.product.K42447.html?upsh=1&sc=K424...  I couldn't live without this handy dandy gadget!

“We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand.”

Randy Pausch
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Posts: 2,241
Registered: ‎03-10-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@sunala

@Shanus

@Poodlepet2 

and any one else willing to teach me and those like me.

I'm a MidWest 60 year old Christian woman who is loving this thread to death!  I need another education when one of you has the time and patience.  What is matzo meal?  My DM made what she called salmon patties-she did not use bell peppers of any color but did use onions and saltine crackers crushed.  She may have added a little flour also to help bind but other than that, they were fried as stated and were yummy.  My ONLY taste of salmon until I was grown and had a salmon fillet.  Like stated before; I live in the MidWest-fresh seafood is an urban myth as any we receive is at minimum a day old.  Before Red Lobster hit the area, the majority of people I knew growing up only ate salmon and tuna from a can.  Would saltines be allowed in a kosher diet? 

You all are amazing-loving this thread!

Respected Contributor
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

[ Edited ]

mustang66lady wrote:

@sunala

@Shanus

@Poodlepet2 

and any one else willing to teach me and those like me.

I'm a MidWest 60 year old Christian woman who is loving this thread to death!  I need another education when one of you has the time and patience.  What is matzo meal?  My DM made what she called salmon patties-she did not use bell peppers of any color but did use onions and saltine crackers crushed.  She may have added a little flour also to help bind but other than that, they were fried as stated and were yummy.  My ONLY taste of salmon until I was grown and had a salmon fillet.  Like stated before; I live in the MidWest-fresh seafood is an urban myth as any we receive is at minimum a day old.  Before Red Lobster hit the area, the majority of people I knew growing up only ate salmon and tuna from a can.  Would saltines be allowed in a kosher diet? 

You all are amazing-loving this thread!


@mustang66lady- welcome to our community! It's wonderful when we have such diversity, and any of us will be happy to teach you what we know.

 

**I am editing this portion because I don't think I explained it well: As far as saltines, they are certainly kosher BUT NOT FOR PASSOVER. What isn't kosher is anything from a pig, including the fat (lard). Some people use lard for baking and cooking, so those foods would not be kosher.

 

All dairy is kosher, as are eggs. Meat such as beef, lamb, chicken and veal can be kosher if they are killed humanely. Certain parts of the cow are not kosher. Usually the hind quarter is not kosher; cuts such as porterhouse, rump, T-bone are not kosher (don't ask me why; maybe someone else can explain). Also, shellfish is not kosher because it lays at the bottom of the sea. Fish with scales are kosher, such as salmon, tuna, swordfish, etc.

 

We also don't mix meat and dairy to eat at the same time.

 

There are so many rules for kosher. Here is a better explanation than I gave you, I hope it helps.Thanks so much for your interest!

 

http://www.sealk.org/what-is-kosher/?gclid=Cj0KEQiAuonGBRCaotXoycysvIMBEiQAcxV0nCdwMC8qpy_CKyQm34c2S...

“We cannot change the cards we are dealt, just how we play the hand.”

Randy Pausch
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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@mustang66lady, you might know matzoh by it's Christian name: unlevened bread. It is made like a common saltine cracker without salt: it's simply wheat flour and water.  What I find fascinating is that when it was initially manufactured commercially, it was ruled that from start to finish ,it has to be made in 17 minutes!

 

The wheat-and where it is stored-must never come into contact with "unclean" foods. You can read about Jewish Law and its bare beginnings in the Book of Leviticus. Here is what you will find fascinating: in addition to those basic laws, the sages and rabbis saw the need to protect the Laws-and there are laws covering EVERY aspect of life.  We call the Laws "Halacha"  We have volumes upon volumes of commentary by different schools of Rabbinic Philosophy....a young Orthodox male spends the vast majority of his life studying them. It's difficult to explain, and I don't want to give the impression that one group of Jews is more observant and better than others, but I am fascinated with the Orthodox and ultra-Orthodox. I, myself, am Reformed.....that being said, many Reformed Jews keep kosher homes and observe Kashrut-Kashrut refers to dietary laws.

 

@sunala expressed very eloquently about how we feel about food and the power it gives us as women. Eating is somewhat of a Holy Event that we share with our families. It is part of our identity-and sets us apart from others.

 

What we eat and what the raw materials to make food with is so important, every company-including beverage companies such as Pepsico-employ full-time rabbis to oversee every aspect of preparation and packaging.

 

I will get into this later, but Ashkenazi Jews don't consume corn or corn byproducts during Passover.  Big companies open up an entire factory that is certified Kosher: no non-kosher ingredients are allowed to enter the production area-ever.  Many people swear that soda made with cane sugar tastes better than that sweetened with high fructose corn syrup....they stock up!

 

Now, let's get back to matzoh....there is a type of matzoh called Shmura Matzoh or "Guarded Matzoh"....The wheat from which it is made is watched and guarded in the fields 24/7 while it grows! Strict Rabbinic supervision insures there is no remote chance that it could have come into contact with non-kosher things-including menstruating women!!!!! It is expensive, and I remember when you had to know somebody who was Ultra-Orthodox to get it! Now it's sold in the Passover section in our local Wal-Mart. It's round-whereas most commercial matzoh is square-and it's darker in color-as if it's lightly charred.  I love it: to me, it has a different flavor.

 

I'm having tablet problems and I don't want to lose what I've written....

 

I think the next topic that might be of interest to you is why we don't eat corn, beans or rice during Pesach, but Sephardic  and Ethiopian Jews do...... stay tuned-and everybody, pitch in here!

Shalom,

Poodlepet2

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Registered: ‎05-17-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

OK, others back me up if any facts wrong for @mustang66lady. Firstly, the recipes here are specifically for Passover...we do not use bread, breadcrumbs, etc. but substitute "matzo meal" which is essentially finely ground matzo. It can be on the same aisle in most supermarkets as the Japanese, Hispanic speciality items.

 

Although some foods are marked for Passover only, others are not. Those strictly observing  Passover will choose from those items and at home avoid using any recipes that use flour, leavening, etc. 

 

I think somewhere in this thread it was explained that the Jewish people fled Egypt in such haste, that they grabbed what they had, clothes, etc. & bread had not had time to rise...probably not the same as the sheets of cracker like matzo, as we use today to symbolize that bread.

 

So as far as Salmon Pattie recipe, saltines can be used for you instead of matzo meal since you're not observing Passover. The Passover products have nothing to do with following a Kosher diet which has strict dietary rules... too many to explain & some I may miss. Google Kosher Diet or just Kosher and there should be an explanation for you.

 

Hope this answered your question.

 

Shanus

 

 

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Registered: ‎03-09-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@Shanus, II hope you don't mind me chiming in with historic factoids...this time of year always gets me thinking about who I am....

 

You brought up a great point: we do what we can with what we have access to. For example, when DH was active duty in the USAF in Dayton OH, the Jewish population was small and we were not exactly catered to in terms of kosher groceries.  At our Air Force Synagogue, most of us considered ourselves "Biblically Kosher" meaning an Apple was kosher because it was....an Apple. It might have sat on an opened pack of bacon-and that certainly would not have flown with some. There was a near riot in Rockland County New York over.....Apple's and what they were polished with! We had no such concerns.....

Poodlepet2

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Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

This is an inspired idea for leftover roasted turkey or chicken.

 

I buy these "Simply Made" frozen entrees and enjoy one every now and then for lunch. For me, Mrs. Diabetic, they are delicious and portioned controlled.

 

Yesterday, I had a roasted turkey entree mixed up with sweet potatoes in a delightful little brown sugar sauce and green beans....if you had leftover white potatoes, that would work as well.

 

Another Passover favorite is lasagna: you can use your choice of ground beef, chicken or turkey. You make a meat sauce and I add lots of veggies: mushrooms, zucchini and carrots. You can soak a couple of matzoh and use them as noodles....or you don't have to soak the matzoh: zucchini and mushrooms put out a lot of moisture.  Use cheese or not....Because of diet concerns, I have switched to vegan cheese, and Daiya "Mozzarella" is great stuff! 

 

I had a giggle recently: Jaime Gellar posted a chicken recipe that was meant to "surprise" and in a good mischievous way shock her family and guests. She made chicken cutlets and topped them with vegan cheese.

Poodlepet2

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Posts: 4,573
Registered: ‎05-17-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@Poodlepet2  Although some subject matter is staying from Recipes here, I'm sure our info is interesting to some. So it's a combo of food/history/personal traditions.

 

My best friend of 45 yrs., has an older son who decided to become an ultra orthodox rabbi, more than Hasidic & lives in Munsie NY in a community of those with similar beliefs. My friends were not that "into" Judaism, even though attended Temple, etc. They had to quickly learn an entire new way of life to the extremes of the practice of being Jewish. 

 

I've enjoyed learning along with her. There are so many "rules and regulations" like unless husband & wife, men and women do not touch...I do greet David any longer w/ a hug. My husband can't kiss his wife or even shake her hand. They (9 kids included..almost 1each year married since they choose no birth control) all speak Yiddish and save Hebrew for prayer only. I learned a lot of Yiddish growing up since at one time or another, we had both sets of grandparents living w/ us who spoke "broken English" (Yiddish/English). In fact, I taught some Yiddish to my friend so she could communicate w/ store keepers when she went up to visit her son and family. 

 

They all wear the black coats, hats, long curly sideburns and prayer shawls under their coats. Speaking of Kosher, our Kosher is nothing compared to their approach. When David in family come to NC to visit his family, they load their stretched, re-vamped van w/ many coolers filled w/ special items.. not just meats/chickens, but cheeses, milk for kids, snacks & any condiments approved by the strict laws they follow. My friend has purchased separate sets of pots, plates & flatwear & most meals are prepped on an outdoor grill kept separate for their use. Prayers must be made to "kosher" the oven & it is lined w/ foil.

 

My point is to anyone interested and reading, there are many degrees of the practice of Judiasm. It is an ancient and interesting religion like Christianity and most other religions. One can read forever and still never know all there is to learn. 

 

In fact today is the Jewish sabbath. Many Jews do not even write (text), ride in car, turn lights or stove on & off...they spend the day in quiet prayer. 

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,573
Registered: ‎05-17-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

@Poodlepet2. This thread is much more interesting than just Recipes, as it turns out. Of course, chime away!! I'm certainly far from an expert stuck here in the "boon docks".

 

Respected Contributor
Posts: 4,573
Registered: ‎05-17-2010

Re: PASSOVER RECIPES

I do have a fear of proofing because of "religion".

 

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